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NFL great Junior Seau dead?

Originally posted by blizzuntz:
Originally posted by English:
Originally posted by blizzuntz:
There are many player and people who get concussion....

Of those people who have multiple/ many concussions how many of them commit suicide?

I doubt that percentage is any different than the General population percentage.

Basically the question would be do NFL players commit suicide at a higher rate than the rest of the general population...

I don't think it is significantly different.

Sorry but this is pure assumption. It could have been written from the opposite viewpoint. Until the matter is scientifically researched, any conclusions are pure guesswork.

That would be my study design. Compare depression rates


Do it. Get some University to sponsor you first, though!
Originally posted by English:
Originally posted by blizzuntz:
Originally posted by English:
Originally posted by blizzuntz:
There are many player and people who get concussion....

Of those people who have multiple/ many concussions how many of them commit suicide?

I doubt that percentage is any different than the General population percentage.

Basically the question would be do NFL players commit suicide at a higher rate than the rest of the general population...

I don't think it is significantly different.

Sorry but this is pure assumption. It could have been written from the opposite viewpoint. Until the matter is scientifically researched, any conclusions are pure guesswork.

That would be my study design. Compare depression rates


Do it. Get some University to sponsor you first, though!

Lol

I have my own research going on! I'm sure the NFL is already on it
Is steriods a factor in this?

Don't flame lol
Originally posted by TonyStarks:
Is steriods a factor in this?

Don't flame lol

Steroids could definitely be a factor. It has been indicated in causing depression after long term use
Originally posted by LA9erFan:
I'd normally agree with you guys regarding the idea that players should know the risks of playing in the NFL, but disagree in this case. Not too long ago, what we call a concussion today is what we would call "getting your bell rung", and you were a p***y if you didn't get back in the game. That mentality went from Pee Wee football all the way up to the NFL. Only recently have we gotten an idea of what the effect of "getting your bell rung" actually is, and we still don't really have an idea of what the cumulative impact of a bunch of small concussions is, which is why a study like the one that Seau's brain went to is important.

I don't feel bad for guys with bum ankles, knees, etc, because I feel like they understood what they were signing up for in that respect. I don't think the same is true about head injuries, and I still don't think we really know what the dangers are.

My only problem with this is I don't think there is any definitive proof that getting multiple concussions in a 4 hour period is any different than getting multiple concussions in a 4 year period but never getting more than one per game.

I half heartedly agree that it was an improvement when the NFL started ensuring you don't send the players right back in after getting their bell rung, though again I am not sure what long term difference this is really making.

I really only see 2 area's of improvement the NFL can make, but again we are at least at, if not past the point of we are now changing, changed the game so much...it should just be renamed and considered some new sport.

1. equipment. If there are better style, more modern gear they can wear
2. Think about staring an insurance pool, and forcing retirements after X amount of concussions, with the insurance paying off the contract
Originally posted by 9erfanAUS:
I disagree with you. It is now well known in the sporting and healthcare industries that concussions can have long term health effects. I don't think that it can be argued otherwise. Players are made aware that they may suffer long term health conditions when they sign their contract.

That's true, but I think it's a little different with head injuries because the long term health effects are so varied and vague. For example, I heard Chad Brown (former Seahawk & Steeler LB) talking about how he's incredibly emotional now, and cries all of the time at the dumbest things. With a bum ankle, for example, you know that if you play on it you run the risk of having a hard time walking. But with a head injury, there are all sorts of weird side effects that we're only starting to understand, and certainly didn't understand much at all back when guys like Seau were starting to play football.

I guess my point is that our understanding of what players are signing up for as it relates to head injuries is a lot more unclear than it is with things like shoulders, knees, etc.
Originally posted by danimal:
My only problem with this is I don't think there is any definitive proof that getting multiple concussions in a 4 hour period is any different than getting multiple concussions in a 4 year period but never getting more than one per game.

I half heartedly agree that it was an improvement when the NFL started ensuring you don't send the players right back in after getting their bell rung, though again I am not sure what long term difference this is really making.

I really only see 2 area's of improvement the NFL can make, but again we are at least at, if not past the point of we are now changing, changed the game so much...it should just be renamed and considered some new sport.

1. equipment. If there are better style, more modern gear they can wear
2. Think about staring an insurance pool, and forcing retirements after X amount of concussions, with the insurance paying off the contract

Ya, I think it's all about improving the gear. I don't like the changes to the sport recently either, all I'm saying is that we're only starting to scratch the surface of our understanding of concussions.
Junior Seau had brain disease CTE when he committed suicide

Junior Seau, one of the NFL's best and fiercest players for nearly two decades, had a degenerative brain disease when he committed suicide last May, the National Institutes of Health told The Associated Press on Thursday.

Results of an NIH study of Seau's brain revealed abnormalities consistent with chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE).

The NIH, based in Bethesda, Md., conducted a study of three unidentified brains, one of which was Seau's. It said the findings on Seau were similar to autopsies of people "with exposure to repetitive head injuries."

Seau's family requested the analysis of his brain, which was overseen by Dr. Russell Lonser.

Seau was a star linebacker for 20 NFL seasons with San Diego, Miami and New England before retiring in 2009. He died of a self-inflicted shotgun wound.

He joins a list of several dozen football players who had CTE. Boston University's centre for study of the disease reported last month that 34 former pro players and nine who played only college football suffered from CTE.

"I was not surprised after learning a little about CTE that he had it," Seau's 23-year-old son Tyler said. "He did play so many years at that level. I was more just kind of angry I didn't do something more and have the awareness to help him more, and now it is too late.

"I don't think any of us were aware of the side effects that could be going on with head trauma until he passed away. We didn't know his behaviour was from head trauma."

That behaviour, according to Tyler Seau and Junior's ex-wife Gina, included wild mood swings, irrationality, forgetfulness, insomnia and depression.

"He emotionally detached himself and would kind of 'go away' for a little bit," Tyler Seau said. "And then the depression and things like that. It started to progressively get worse."

He hid it well in public, they said. But not when he was with family or close friends.

The NFL faces lawsuits by thousands of former players who say the league withheld information on the harmful effects concussions can have on their health.

Seau is not the first former NFL player who killed himself, then was found to have CTE. Dave Duerson and Ray Easterling are others.

Duerson, a former Chicago Bears defensive back, left a note asking for his brain to be studied for signs of trauma before shooting himself. His family filed a wrongful death suit against the NFL, claiming the league didn't do enough to prevent or treat the concussions that severely damaged his brain.

Easterling played safety for the Falcons in the 1970s. After his career, he suffered from dementia, depression and insomnia, according to his wife, Mary Ann. He committed suicide last April.

Mary Ann Easterling is among the plaintiffs who have sued the NFL.

"It was important to us to get to the bottom of this, the truth," Gina Seau said, "and now that it has been conclusively determined from every expert that he had obviously had it, CTE, we just hope it is taken more seriously.

"You can't deny it exists, and it is hard to deny there is a link between head trauma and CTE. There's such strong evidence correlating head trauma and collisions and CTE."

Tyler Seau played football through high school and for two years in college. He says he has no symptoms of any brain trauma.

Gina Seau's son, Jake, now a high school junior, played football for two seasons, but has switched to lacrosse and has been recruited to play at Duke.

"Lacrosse is really his sport and what he is passionate about," she said. "He is a good football player and probably could continue. But especially now watching what his dad went through, he says, 'Why would I risk lacrosse for football?'

"I didn't have to have a discussion with him after we saw what Junior went through."

Her 12-year-old son, Hunter, has shown no interest in playing football.

"That's fine with me," she said.

http://www.timescolonist.com/sports/football/ap-newsbreak-junior-seau-had-brain-disease-cte-when-he-committed-suicide-1.43989

More changes coming to the NFL.
IMO the game needs to be slowed down, by banning all types PED and PE Supplements. Take a "if it's not a protein shake, it's illegal" type of stand, and enforce it vigorously. None of this appeal BS. Some of these 300 lbs guys running 4.5 40s is just freakish, and un-human like.
sad situation
Originally posted by SFTifoso:
IMO the game needs to be slowed down, by banning all types PED and PE Supplements. Take a "if it's not a protein shake, it's illegal" type of stand, and enforce it vigorously. None of this appeal BS. Some of these 300 lbs guys running 4.5 40s is just freakish, and un-human like.

Yeah. Do you think they made it worse by making it a passing league? Its less mano-a-mano collisions, but then again the WRs are getting blown up.
  • Jcool
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 14,051
Andrew Brandt ‏@adbrandt

Junior Seau family, now w/evidence of CTE, suing the NFL for wrongful death. Sense lawyers had paperwork ready waiting for results.
I forgot he even died
Originally posted by Jcool:
Andrew Brandt ‏@adbrandt

Junior Seau family, now w/evidence of CTE, suing the NFL for wrongful death. Sense lawyers had paperwork ready waiting for results.

Stupid. I understand their grief but this is a money grab.
  • BobS
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 7,900
It is pretty pathetic the family is suing, wonder if it was their idea or a money grabbing lawyer? His ex-wife is part of the suit. Seau made a lot of money for the risks he took, unfortunately Junior was one of the unlucky ones who ended up with debilitating injuries. Saying the NFL covered and concealed the risks of traumatic brain injuries is pretty pathetic. Who does not know repeated blows to the head are bad for you? Some people come out ok after being whacked in the head a lot, some do not.