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Define: "Type of QB who puts an offense on his back"

I've heard that saying a lot when people talk about certain QBs in the NFL, and I always think "What does that really even mean"?

I'm curious how you guys would define a hypothetical QB who "puts the team on his back."
A QB or any other position who suddenly catches fire and is the sole reason a team comes back or finishes a game strong. Put's the team on their back and carries them to the finish.
Read this thread and if the team isn't on Alex's back, tell me how it isn't?

http://www.49erswebzone.com/forum/niners/159089-calling-two-plays-huddle/
Originally posted by stillpans4gold:
I've heard that saying a lot when people talk about certain QBs in the NFL, and I always think "What does that really even mean"?

I'm curious how you guys would define a hypothetical QB who "puts the team on his back."

When his RB is averaging a 2.5 average, OL penalties are in excess, and receivers are dropping passes.... and defenses are losing chunks of yardage... and the QB pulls out a few clutch drives to put the team ahead and in the win column.

To me, that's as much a "put team on back QB" as the ones that are forced to score gobs of points because their defense is sieve throughout an entire game.

Even his toughest critic has to admit, Alex is kicking ass. Lost in all the hoopla surrounding the Niners current success is that they're doing it with a rookie head coach and yet another new offense. Despite that, we're still seeing the offense improve every week. You can't call that kind of progress anything but remarkable.

If Harbaugh can keep Alex playing at least this well, then I say it's a hell of a job done, and he needs to be coach of the year.
Too often, NFL analysts use loose terms like this when talking about a player or a team; and I don't think they really even know what they're implying - It just sounds right...


Is it...

1) When the team was behind or needed to air it out they succeed.

2) The team calls more pass plays than run plays.

3) They're actively engaged off-field, making sure everyone is doing their part.
Originally posted by stillpans4gold:
Too often, NFL analysts use loose terms like this when talking about a player or a team; and I don't think they really even know what they're implying - It just sounds right...


Is it...

1) When the team was behind or needed to air it out they succeed.

2) The team calls more pass plays than run plays.

3) They're actively engaged off-field, making sure everyone is doing their part.

this
"He hasn't put a team on his back" employs that he's had the option to do so, and chose not to do it.

I think when they say it, they're actually refering to something specific that could be challenged....

Like with Mark Sanchez, I think they mean he doesn't take shots down field. For Alex, I think it means his average yards per game is low, and the Niners put together drives on the ground. It's funny. In reality, Like Rome and Farve, you put the team on their backs and there is a good chance they F it up.

"Puts a team on his Back": Good fantasy football QB.
Alex had a good game last week (completed 11 passes for 170 yards) but the Niners rushing attack was dominate and finished with over 200 yards. I would say a qb is taking the team on his back when he's asked to make big plays even if he doesn't get the best pass protection and the running game isn't working.
[ Edited by nflguy49 on Oct 13, 2011 at 9:57 AM ]
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Alex is playing pretty good but people are getting waaaay out of hand here. It's only week 5 and his history is hard to forget. Even Derek Anderson had a pro bowl season. Now look at him.
Steve Young put teams on his back, and took a monkey off it too.
Originally posted by verb1der:
Steve Young put teams on his back, and took a monkey off it too.

was going to say the exact same thing.
Originally posted by stillpans4gold:
I've heard that saying a lot when people talk about certain QBs in the NFL, and I always think "What does that really even mean"?

I'm curious how you guys would define a hypothetical QB who "puts the team on his back."

Aaron Rodgers.
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