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Anyone else worried about retaining the current Niners coaching staff?

Originally posted by monsterzero789:
Roman can kick rocks. Fangio's too old to want a HC job IMO. I would be worried about losing someone like Tomsula or Leavitt. Seely... Meh our ST was s**t this year

he's only 3 years older than harbaugh.
So who is Gamble they are saying all these teams are interviewing?

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000120638/article/report-san-francisco-49ers-exec-gamble-sought-for-gm-jobs

Is this any kind of loss to us?
Originally posted by BayArea:
So who is Gamble they are saying all these teams are interviewing?

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000120638/article/report-san-francisco-49ers-exec-gamble-sought-for-gm-jobs

Is this any kind of loss to us?

He is the one that focuses on finding personnel already in the league that the team would want to sign like Rogers, Manningham, Jacobs.... I forgot the article but I believe Baalke handles college scouting while gamble does the same with guys who are pending FAs on other teams.

He is highly respected and had he left a year or two earlier it would be a huge loss, but the FO has built a good foundation so his impact for the team has already been made making it less of a loss.
[ Edited by 5280High on Dec 31, 2012 at 5:16 PM ]
Wonder if Tom Rathman is interested in moving up in our coaching staff, been a great running back coach
Originally posted by 5280High:
Originally posted by BayArea:
So who is Gamble they are saying all these teams are interviewing?

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap1000000120638/article/report-san-francisco-49ers-exec-gamble-sought-for-gm-jobs

Is this any kind of loss to us?

He is the one that focuses on finding personnel already in the league that the team would want to sign like Rogers, Manningham, Jacobs.... I forgot the article but I believe Baalke handles college scouting while gamble does the same with guys who are pending FAs on other teams.

He is highly respected and had he left a year or two earlier it would be a huge loss, but the FO has built a good foundation so his impact for the team has already been made making it less of a loss.

Interesting. How long has he been with us? I am assuming he goes further back than Harbaugh?
As long as working with Harbaugh and the 49ers is an attractive option to the coaching world I am not worried. That is what happened with Bill Walsh, with Mike Holmgren replaced by Mike Shanahan. The head coach is the key. If he knows X and O, and has a fun, hard working atmosphere, innovative and exciting, and good players--it works out fine.
Meh....change happens.
Only one I hope stays is Fangio
Originally posted by BayArea:
Interesting. How long has he been with us? I am assuming he goes further back than Harbaugh?

Not 100% sure when but I think the FO lured him from the colts as a consultant under McClueless, and then got promoted when Baalke took over.
With the spread coming into fashion the Niners have the QB in Kaep to run it. I know Shaw signed a multi-year contract at Stanford but he would've been a better choice than Roman if he had went the pro route. Coach Harbaugh knows offense so finding an OC he's comfortable with would not be a problem. Ault in his "non-retirement" mode is an intriguing choice.
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
Originally posted by IdahoNiner:
Yea, really good thought. I could get behind that. what kind f offense has he been running in the CFL? more of a pure WCO? I would love to bring a more pure style of WCO back to the niners, but i havent been sold on any of the WCO coordinator options out there. Trestman deffinately is intrigueing.

If you remember, Trestman has always called a more high-octane variant of the WCO. A very aggressive passing attack that utilizes slants and screens to setup longer downfield passes. This was especially the case in 1995 when the 49ers had Derek Loville as their running back and he averaged 3.3 yards per carry. Basically Trestman compensated for the lack of a running game by using a lot of shorter passes and Jerry Rice hated his guts for awhile since Trestman went real traditional WCO, using a lot of short slants and passes over the middle in lieu of running the ball which resulted in Jerry catching a lot of passes but getting his ass kicked on the regular. They eventually made up when both were in Oakland together and Jerry had another good season with Trestman as the OC. It does bear to mention that Jerry Rice set an NFL receiving record for most yards in a single that year with Trestman calling the plays, one that had stood until Megatron recently beat it.

He was the same way with the Raiders and once again, he didn't have a great running game, his best option was an aging Charlie Garner, so he used a lot of different passing attacks and sometimes it resulted in the QB getting beat up, ala similar to Mike Martz's system, which is why Rich Gannon complained about the system, but ultimately the Raiders did have a lot of success and they did get to the Super Bowl with a very high-powered offense.

But once again, he never really had a strong running game at his disposal, at least not in the NFL, not even with the Cardinals where Larry Centers and a broken down Adrian Murrell were his best options. He did become more run oriented as the OC at North Carolina State but that was after Rivers had left and they ended up with a bunch of craptastic talent. He will individualize his offense to whatever a team can do well. I think the 49ers with receivers like Crabtree, Davis, runningbacks like Gore and Hunter and an all purpose weapon in James would allow for a very varied, unpredictable and explosive offense.

Its hard to compare what he's done in Canada to the NFL due to all the rule variations and differences regarding the CFL. I'm not that familiar with the league but I know his teams have been relatively successful. One of the biggest positives about him is how well he's done with young quarterbacks. He still works with various quarterbacks in the offseason and a lot of guys go to him to train up, with varying degrees of success considering Tim Tebow was one of his students. He has a tremendous passion for the quarterback position.




"Marc leaves no stone unturned. It's amazing how he can comprehend all this stuff. He has to understand everything". Jerry Rice

Yea, i have been reading alot of past articles, and im really starting to like the idea f bringing this guy back to the NFL if he would be interested in anther coordinator job.

I also really like the article you quoted about him stepping on teams throats when he has the lead. This is an aspect that i really liked harbaugh for in college, but so far we havent seen that philosophy translate into the NFL.

I remember his offenses slightly, especially his time in oakland, and feel we have a similar nucleus to what oakland had, the exception being we have a beter running game. My only concern would be how his QB coaching philosophy would mesh with Harbaughs. But i would imagine that harbaugh took some of his philosophys with him and learned some from him with his time in Oakland.

Thanks for bringing this guy up, since he wanst a candidate that i had considered, and i didnt realise that harbaugh had interviewed him when he came to the niners. Sounds like a great candidate.
Originally posted by RishikeshA:
With the spread coming into fashion the Niners have the QB in Kaep to run it. I know Shaw signed a multi-year contract at Stanford but he would've been a better choice than Roman if he had went the pro route. Coach Harbaugh knows offense so finding an OC he's comfortable with would not be a problem. Ault in his "non-retirement" mode is an intriguing choice.

I ould be really disapointed honestly with Ault. I dont think the pistol will last long term, and quite frankly, i dont think we are really suited to run it. I understand Kaep is athletic, and that we have LMJ, but i just dont like it. I would much rather Kaep learn to be a WCO QB, and build around that philosophy for the long term, then to possibly be the experiment for something that doesnt work out long term, and slows the development of our offense as a whole.
Originally posted by IdahoNiner:
Yea, i have been reading alot of past articles, and im really starting to like the idea f bringing this guy back to the NFL if he would be interested in anther coordinator job.

I also really like the article you quoted about him stepping on teams throats when he has the lead. This is an aspect that i really liked harbaugh for in college, but so far we havent seen that philosophy translate into the NFL.

I remember his offenses slightly, especially his time in oakland, and feel we have a similar nucleus to what oakland had, the exception being we have a beter running game. My only concern would be how his QB coaching philosophy would mesh with Harbaughs. But i would imagine that harbaugh took some of his philosophys with him and learned some from him with his time in Oakland.

Thanks for bringing this guy up, since he wanst a candidate that i had considered, and i didnt realise that harbaugh had interviewed him when he came to the niners. Sounds like a great candidate.

Here's another good article where he talks about his experiences with Bill Walsh.


http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/marc_trestman/08/21/trestman.walsh.draft/1.html



When I was an assistant coach with the Minnesota Vikings in 1986, the San Francisco 49ers asked permission to interview me for the quarterbacks coaching position under Bill Walsh. The Vikings turned them down and my chance to learn under Coach Walsh was put on hold.

Then, in 1989, I was the offensive coordinator of the Cleveland Browns and had the good fortune to cross paths with Coach Walsh in a TV production meeting when he was an analyst for NBC. I had a number of questions for him and was amazed at his patience. His responses were different from any coach I had ever spoken to. His ability to communicate the science of the game in a unique and articulate fashion was incredible. After leaving the meeting I humbly asked him if I could come out and visit with him when time permitted. He was extremely gracious in hoping I would look him up.

In 1995, that turned into reality when I became the 49ers offensive coordinator under George Seifert. To train for the job I watched tapes of Coach Walsh installing the West Coast offense, followed by Mike Holmgen's and Mike Shanahan's presentation of the offense. It was an incredible experience for me to get into their minds as well as listen and watch Bill teach this offense with his incredible salesmanship, detail, and a dry sense of humor.

In my first year the Niners we lead the NFL in passing and were second in total offense. Then the organization brought Bill back as a consultant to the team. Some members of the media seemed to think Bill was brought back to run the offense and oversee George Seifert's coaching staff. I refused to believe that was the case, but there were many in the business who advised me to resign the day I heard Bill was coming back.

I viewed Coach Walsh's arrival differently. I enjoyed working for George Seifert and my wife and I loved the Bay Area. I believed owner Eddie DeBartolo simply thought Bill could be a tremendous resource to the organization. I looked at it as the opportunity of a lifetime and now there would be daily access to his knowledge.



By Marc Trestman, SI.com

My experience with Bill during the 1996 season was an amazing journey into the mind of a football legend. He gave me daily notes of what he saw in practice, which was a unique insight into his original vision of the offense and the training of the quarterback. I asked him to coach a QB workout during the offseason. What I got was a first-hand clinic of training that has helped me dramatically over the last decade, reinforcing my knowledge and passion for the game's most important position. Once again, in 1996 we had one of the better teams and top offenses in the league.

Bill always spoke to me as an equal with the utmost professional respect. When I first referred to him as Coach Walsh he would politely ask me to call him "Bill." As accomplished, knowledgeable and frankly brilliant as Coach Walsh was, he was never arrogant or demeaning. I knew he missed addressing the team, so with Coach Seifert's approval, I asked him to speak with the offense early in the 1996 season. His insights and presentation was amazing. The meeting was blown completely out of proportion, interpreted by some as him taking over the offense. What he gave the players, especially those who had never heard him speak was well worth the negative fallout.

Our discussions went way beyond play development and QB reads. Bill opened up to me about his growth in the profession, how Paul Brown helped develop his coaching philosophy and his disappointment in not being named Coach Brown's successor in Cincinnati.

When we got on the bus to travel to the airport, hotel, or stadium, I always tried to ride with Bill. I had pre-planned questions to pick his incredible mind on a variety of subjects from QB play to managing the organization, drafting and scouting philosophy and much more. Bill always gave incredibly articulate responses and was unselfish with the information. I really believed he loved spending time with young coaches. I know there were many coaches like myself and many more that were closer to him than I was who owe so much to Bill. I have talked to coaches over the years that were amazed when they called Coach Walsh or dropped him a note, they would receive a personal response in a reasonable amount of time. I am not just talking pro or college coaches, but high school coaches as well.

As the offensive coordinator for the Raiders in 2002, just two days after our offense finished at the top of the NFL, I received a beautiful note from Bill in his large, unique printing style with a warm note of congratulations.

I had a chance to start my NFL coaching career working for Hall of Fame coach Bud Grant. He is my mentor and his leadership qualities, game management and observational skills were off the charts, and he would always take time to educate me on many important aspects of life and the game. Coach Grant's long-time offensive coordinator was Jerry Burns, who coach Walsh admitted to me on a number of occasions was a major influence on the principles of the West Coast offense. But Coach Walsh put it together from top to bottom, implementing an organizational style, meeting and practice format, as well as player development and evaluation process that is implemented by so many NFL teams today.

I spoke to Bill just weeks before his death. He was spending whatever time he could with his wife Geri and helping Jim Harbaugh evaluate his program at Stanford. Jim was excited about having Bill around, and Coach Walsh was happy for the opportunity to be of assistance to a program he loved.

Like so many others, I had dropped Bill notes over the last year encouraging a speedy and complete recovery from Leukemia. I could sense he was weak and battling through his illness as best he could. During the years I coached on the West Coast, we had an annual lunch date at a small restaurant near his home. I was always amazed that he would take the time out of a very busy schedule to spend a few hours with me. I had made plans to get out to the West Coast in the next couple of months, as much to renew that tradition. I couldn't wait to sit down with him again and catch up on family, world events and, of course, football. I am sure there are many coaches out there who had hoped to cross paths with him as well, wanting to pick his brain on subjects related to football and beyond.

I am not here professing that I had a close friendship with Coach Walsh. I did not, but I had a tremendous opportunity to get to know him. Bill Walsh was tagged with the term, "genius." I am here to tell you Bill was just that, but he was also a gentleman and a class act. Without question, the game and those lives he touched will forever be better.

http://sportsillustrated.cnn.com/2007/writers/marc_trestman/08/21/trestman.walsh.draft/1.html
[ Edited by Phoenix49ers on Dec 31, 2012 at 8:52 PM ]
  • sfout
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Greg Roman has 2 chances of becoming the next HC of Jags should Mularkey be fired.

They've already interviewed Falcons exec Dave Caldwell who attended the same college as Roman and is said to have a fairly close friendship with Roman.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/12/31/report-six-candidates-on-eagles-list/

http://www.csnbayarea.com/blog/matt-maiocco/gamble-draws-attention-gm-openings
Originally posted by sfout:
Greg Roman has 2 chances of becoming the next HC of Jags should Mularkey be fired.

They've already interviewed Falcons exec Dave Caldwell who attended the same college as Roman and is said to have a fairly close friendship with Roman.

http://profootballtalk.nbcsports.com/2012/12/31/report-six-candidates-on-eagles-list/

http://www.csnbayarea.com/blog/matt-maiocco/gamble-draws-attention-gm-openings


Yep. Hopefully he's smart enough to stay clear of the Tebow nonsense altogether. Trade for Alex and build around him.