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Harbaugh having heart procedure

I mentioned AF (atrial fib) and that I have had many pts fixed w/ pacemakers. I would guess that most of them first underwent cardioversion, as noted a page or two ago. Again, i suggest noboby think anything until the team posts the medical report on Coach H. Everything until then is just speculation. Let's let the medical report come out first.
Originally posted by pasodoc9er:
I mentioned AF (atrial fib) and that I have had many pts fixed w/ pacemakers. I would guess that most of them first underwent cardioversion, as noted a page or two ago. Again, i suggest noboby think anything until the team posts the medical report on Coach H. Everything until then is just speculation. Let's let the medical report come out first.


Electric cardioversion for new onset afib ? I dont know about that unless your symptoms are so severe you have no choice. "Assuming" (and I put heavy emphasis on that bc its only speculation) that this was his first episode, he would likely have been hospitalized to look for an underlying cause for this arrythmia.

I think this was more likely a chronic issue, and therefore he went for a TEE to r/o underlying clots; assuming nothing is found hewould benefit from medical cardioversion or in the case of a.flutter, ablation therapy.
  • cciowa
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Originally posted by SnakePlissken:
Originally posted by cciowa:
Originally posted by WookieOftheYear:
Dr. Matthew DeVane, a cardiologist in Walnut Creek, says Jim Harbaugh "likely" had a cardioversion performed …

DeVane is the president of the East Bay Board of Directors for the American Heart Association: "About the only thing I can think of, and it's very common, is that his heart probably went out of rhythm into something called atrial fibrillation, which is the most common abnormal heart rhythm. And it can just cause the heart to race and flutter and can make you feel uncomfortable. It's a minor procedure and, again, this is guesswork, but it's called a cardioversion where we put the patient to sleep for just a few minutes and give the heart a little zap to try to re-set it back into a normal rhythm. It's a very, very common procedure. It's done on an out-patient basis. Usually people are home within two hours and ready to go the next day with no limitations or restrictions."
i know a high school girls bb coach who has to wear a device that helps keep her heart in the proper rythm, wonder if he will get hooked up to one of those things. it tells her when s**t is not right and she has to wear it when coaching

Also a possibility that he got an ablation (which would be the long-term fix), also a common out-patient procedure where they run a cord up through your groin to the inside walls of your heart, and temp freeze the muscles causing the irregular convulsions so that everything flows in perfect sequence again.
someone drew a picture of the brain yesterday to help us understand the head of alex,, can someone draw a picture of the heart of JH? i feel there could be a horrid joke and drawing forthcoming
  • cciowa
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maybe johnny gage and roy desoto had to zap him
From my knowledge and experience this takes months of monitering and rest. This allows moniters to allow proper reading. Zero stress is involved, and recomended to not work in stressful enviroments.
Prescription for Harbaugh: Less stress
Dr. William Bommer, a UC Davis professor and the President of the American College of Cardiology for California, said it sounded as if 49ers coach Jim Harbaugh might have experienced atrial fibrillation, the most common cardiac arrhythmia and one that wouldn't have been picked up during the annual physical examinations Harbaugh has had since joining the 49ers.

Bommer said that one of the contributing factors for atrial fibrillation is stress. "I can imagine if you're under pressure to win all the time, that could be a little stressful," he said.

A common procedure to treat atrial fibrillation, Bommer said, is elective cardioversion, during which the patient is sedated and an electric impulse is used to put the heart back into a regular rhythm. "It works in well over 90 percent of the cases," Bommer said. "Literally within four hours, the patient can go home."

Bommer said that in general doctors will tell patients who have had cardioversion to get plenty of sleep, to cut down on caffeine and alcohol and to work on reducing stress in their lives. How Harbaugh, who is among the most animated coaches on game days (and sometimes even in press conferences), handles that last recommendation should be interesting.


http://blogs.sacbee.com/49ers/archives/2012/11/prescription-for-harbaugh-less-stress.html



Sounds like JH might need to chill out a little bit. Maybe not argue every call in the game like his life depends on it.
Hoping for the best coach.
He does seem too high stress sometimes. He is always gritting his teeth and yelling over there. He needs to calm down and enjoy if he wants to last for a while.
  • cciowa
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Originally posted by SanDiego49er:
He does seem too high stress sometimes. He is always gritting his teeth and yelling over there. He needs to calm down and enjoy if he wants to last for a while.

sometimes he spits to
Cocaine and hookrs with Charlie Sheen
  • cciowa
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Originally posted by blizzuntz:
Cocaine and hookrs with Charlie Sheen
trippin and trickin with lindsay lohan at motel 6
Originally posted by WookieOftheYear:
Dr. Matthew DeVane, a cardiologist in Walnut Creek, says Jim Harbaugh "likely" had a cardioversion performed …

DeVane is the president of the East Bay Board of Directors for the American Heart Association: "About the only thing I can think of, and it's very common, is that his heart probably went out of rhythm into something called atrial fibrillation, which is the most common abnormal heart rhythm. And it can just cause the heart to race and flutter and can make you feel uncomfortable. It's a minor procedure and, again, this is guesswork, but it's called a cardioversion where we put the patient to sleep for just a few minutes and give the heart a little zap to try to re-set it back into a normal rhythm. It's a very, very common procedure. It's done on an out-patient basis. Usually people are home within two hours and ready to go the next day with no limitations or restrictions."

I had a cardioversion done a couple years ago myself. Comes from atrial fibrilation. The top chambers of the heart aren't "pumping" correctly, so they sedate you, and shock you back into normal rhythm. I've been totally fine since. A-fib isn't a major deal. Ventrical fibrilation is bad news!!
[ Edited by GBNinerFan on Nov 15, 2012 at 6:56 PM ]
:(

Rally round coach!!!
I can weigh in with the perspective of a 4th year medical student.

Jim most likely had atrial fibrillation which non life threatning arrhythmia. The minor procedure was a DC cardioversion. Jim will be ok.
[ Edited by diablo on Nov 15, 2012 at 7:36 PM ]
schefter just tweeted that he stopped by practice before going home today, the man is a nut lol