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University Of Miami Scandal

NCAA's 'death penalty' could be option for Miami

By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

Indianapolis (AP) -- NCAA President Mark Emmert believes the "death penalty" should be an option for college sports' most egregious rule-breakers.
He just wants it to be used judiciously.

Nearly a quarter-century after the NCAA's harshest sanction destroyed SMU's football program, the allegations swirling at Miami have rekindled the debate.
Critics contend the SMU case proves the punishment was too severe, pointing to the damage it caused not only to the school's football program but to the now defunct Southwest Conference. Supporters say it would send a message that the NCAA is backing up its tough talk.

Miami is the focus of the death penalty talk amid accusations that 72 former and current Hurricanes athletes — most of them football players — received improper benefits and that some coaches knew about it.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2011/08/19/sports/s100115D95.DTL&tsp=1

- 98
This is way worse than what everyone else is doing. this guy tried to bribe them into letting him coach, and they still let him stick around. he tried to fight the compliance officer! This isn't a free meal at the local chilis, they let a ponzi schemer all up in the program.
OFF WITH THEIR HEADS!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
  • AmpLee
  • Hall of Fame
  • Posts: 16,877
Originally posted by kidash:
NCAA's 'death penalty' could be option for Miami

By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

Indianapolis (AP) -- NCAA President Mark Emmert believes the "death penalty" should be an option for college sports' most egregious rule-breakers.
He just wants it to be used judiciously.

Nearly a quarter-century after the NCAA's harshest sanction destroyed SMU's football program, the allegations swirling at Miami have rekindled the debate.
Critics contend the SMU case proves the punishment was too severe, pointing to the damage it caused not only to the school's football program but to the now defunct Southwest Conference. Supporters say it would send a message that the NCAA is backing up its tough talk.

Miami is the focus of the death penalty talk amid accusations that 72 former and current Hurricanes athletes — most of them football players — received improper benefits and that some coaches knew about it.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2011/08/19/sports/s100115D95.DTL&tsp=1

- 98


I don't think they should be banned for life. I think they should get a one year ban then let a moderation panel decide if they should be let back in. They should also retain their veteran status. Wait, what are we talking about again?
Originally posted by AmpLee:
Originally posted by kidash:
NCAA's 'death penalty' could be option for Miami

By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

Indianapolis (AP) -- NCAA President Mark Emmert believes the "death penalty" should be an option for college sports' most egregious rule-breakers.
He just wants it to be used judiciously.

Nearly a quarter-century after the NCAA's harshest sanction destroyed SMU's football program, the allegations swirling at Miami have rekindled the debate.
Critics contend the SMU case proves the punishment was too severe, pointing to the damage it caused not only to the school's football program but to the now defunct Southwest Conference. Supporters say it would send a message that the NCAA is backing up its tough talk.

Miami is the focus of the death penalty talk amid accusations that 72 former and current Hurricanes athletes — most of them football players — received improper benefits and that some coaches knew about it.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2011/08/19/sports/s100115D95.DTL&tsp=1

- 98


I don't think they should be banned for life. I think they should get a one year ban then let a moderation panel decide if they should be let back in. They should also retain their veteran status. Wait, what are we talking about again?

At first I was like then I was like "oh it's Amp"
Originally posted by RogueStout:
Originally posted by LAFortyNinerfan:
Originally posted by drake49er:
Originally posted by jrg:
Somebody please explain the "death penalty" to me in college football

It's basically where the NCAA will ban the school from competing in football for at least 1 year. It would be a devastating blow money wise and they will have a hard time coming back from it.

That's it? If it's one year, that doesn't as deadly as the phrase indicates. Maybe I'm just not seeing the big picture with the long term effects.
Look at it this way.
SMU got a one year ban. All the coaches were fired (or left), all the players left, all the support people left because the school isn't going to pay them to sit around and do nothing.
By the time they were eligible to even play, they had no players and missed the entire next season just trying to put together a staff and team.

Nobody wants to go to a team that can't compete for a Bowl Game let alone a Conference Championship, or play on tv. So when SMU finally did play their first game they basically fielded a Junior College squad and got destroyed in the SWC.

It spiraled from there.

Thanks. So I guess you end up having to move on afterward as if you never had a football program and is starting one for the first time. That would be brutal. But I guess with Miami's rep, they'll still be able to get top recruits once their program is up and running again if they were to get the same penalty given to SMU. For years they would get throttled by the other Florida teams in the recruiting department though.
I never understood what booster's have to gain from paying players? I mean they don't work for the school do they? arent they just alumni?
Originally posted by AmpLee:
Originally posted by kidash:
NCAA's 'death penalty' could be option for Miami

By MICHAEL MAROT
AP Sports Writer

Indianapolis (AP) -- NCAA President Mark Emmert believes the "death penalty" should be an option for college sports' most egregious rule-breakers.
He just wants it to be used judiciously.

Nearly a quarter-century after the NCAA's harshest sanction destroyed SMU's football program, the allegations swirling at Miami have rekindled the debate.
Critics contend the SMU case proves the punishment was too severe, pointing to the damage it caused not only to the school's football program but to the now defunct Southwest Conference. Supporters say it would send a message that the NCAA is backing up its tough talk.

Miami is the focus of the death penalty talk amid accusations that 72 former and current Hurricanes athletes — most of them football players — received improper benefits and that some coaches knew about it.

http://www.sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?f=/n/a/2011/08/19/sports/s100115D95.DTL&tsp=1

- 98


I don't think they should be banned for life. I think they should get a one year ban then let a moderation panel decide if they should be let back in. They should also retain their veteran status. Wait, what are we talking about again?

i see what you did there
Originally posted by niner_empire:
I never understood what booster's have to gain from paying players? I mean they don't work for the school do they? arent they just alumni?

They get to hang out with the athletes. In almost all these cases it's some jock-sniffer that wanted to have cool friends or feel like he had something to do with the success of the team.