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FCUK Robert Quinn

Originally posted by ads_2006:
Balmer part II

I honestly can't stand garbage like this.

What makes him even close to Balmer? Completely different type of player.

Who cares if they're from the same school?

I can do the same thing...

Lawrence Taylor part II.
Big Freak might help Niners' sack attack - Press Democrat



Quote:
By ERIC BRANCH
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Published: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.


How can a 6-foot-4, 265-pound defensive end help a secondary?

Just ask the defensive backs who played behind North Carolina's Robert Quinn, whose rare blend of size, strength and speed earned him the nicknames “Atlas” and “Big Freak” from his teammates.

“Just playing behind him you understand what he does for a defensive back,” North Carolina cornerback Duenta Williams said. “At (East Carolina) two years ago, he sacked a guy so fast that I thought it was false start on the offense or something. I thought they were about to start the play over again. Just situations like that, you didn't have to do too much covering.”

The 49ers have long been searching for a speed-rushing force that could harass quarterbacks and, in turn, mask breakdowns in the secondary. The Niners haven't had a player post more than 8½ sacks in a season since 2002 when Andre Carter had 12½. They have played primarily a 3-4 defense since 2005, but have yet to locate a pass-rushing outside linebacker that's vital to the scheme.

Last year, they used a four-man rotation at outside linebacker consisting of Parys Haralson, Manny Lawson, Travis LaBoy and Ahmad Brooks. The underwhelming quartet managed 16½ sacks, one more than Cowboys outside linebacker DeMarcus Ware.

When asked about his outside linebackers earlier this offseason, new defensive coordinator Vic Fangio offered a lukewarm assessment that ended with this admission: “We're searching.”

That search brings us back to Quinn, a projected top-10 draft pick who, at 265 pounds, ran the 40-yard dash in 4.57 seconds, had a vertical leap of 33 inches and posted a broad jump of 10 feet, 6 inches at his pro day. Big Freak, indeed.

During the NFL Combine, NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said of Quinn, “He's as good a natural pass rusher as I have ever seen.”

Texas A&M linebacker Von Miller, the draft's premier pass-rushing demon, will likely be off the board when the Niners pick at No. 7 and Quinn is widely regarded as the next best option.

The 49ers, however, would likely be envisioning Quinn as their long-awaited 3-4 outside linebacker. And it's believed that Quinn's ideal position in the NFL is defensive end.

“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

Beyond his position at the next level, there are other questions surrounding Quinn, who hasn't played a game in 16 months since he was declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA for accepting $5,642 in benefits from agent. Quinn, who only played two years in college, reportedly lied to NCAA and UNC officials about the gifts.

Despite that misstep, there aren't character concerns surrounding Quinn, 20, who came across as humble and genuinely remorseful in his meeting with the media at the combine.

“I made a selfish mistake and I paid a price for it,” Quinn said. “And my team and my family and coaches paid a price for it. I truly apologized for it.”

Of perhaps more concern to NFL teams is the fact that Quinn has a benign brain tumor, which was diagnosed when he was a senior at Fort Dorchester (S.C.) High School. He had surgery to reduce the fluid backup and was told he would never play sports again.

A few months later, however, he won his third straight state heavyweight wrestling title. As a freshman at UNC, he won the Brian Piccolo Award given to the ACC's most courageous player. Then, as a sophomore, he led the conference in tackles for loss (19) and ranked second in sacks (11).

Quinn, who says he hasn't a tumor-related headache since his surgery, still undergoes an MRI exam every six months to monitor the tumor.

Given his background, it's not surprising that a potential position switch in the NFL doesn't phase him.

Could he be an effective linebacker?

“Whatever I set my mind to,” Quinn said. “If they want me at free safety, I'm going to go play it for you. I really think I can.”
[ Edited by PTulini on Apr 23, 2011 at 8:55 PM ]
Originally posted by PTulini:
Big Freak might help Niners' sack attack - Press Democrat

good post other than peterson this guy and prince are on the top of my list
Originally posted by PTulini:
Big Freak might help Niners' sack attack - Press Democrat



Quote:
By ERIC BRANCH
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Published: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.


How can a 6-foot-4, 265-pound defensive end help a secondary?

Just ask the defensive backs who played behind North Carolina's Robert Quinn, whose rare blend of size, strength and speed earned him the nicknames “Atlas” and “Big Freak” from his teammates.

“Just playing behind him you understand what he does for a defensive back,” North Carolina cornerback Duenta Williams said. “At (East Carolina) two years ago, he sacked a guy so fast that I thought it was false start on the offense or something. I thought they were about to start the play over again. Just situations like that, you didn't have to do too much covering.”

The 49ers have long been searching for a speed-rushing force that could harass quarterbacks and, in turn, mask breakdowns in the secondary. The Niners haven't had a player post more than 8½ sacks in a season since 2002 when Andre Carter had 12½. They have played primarily a 3-4 defense since 2005, but have yet to locate a pass-rushing outside linebacker that's vital to the scheme.

Last year, they used a four-man rotation at outside linebacker consisting of Parys Haralson, Manny Lawson, Travis LaBoy and Ahmad Brooks. The underwhelming quartet managed 16½ sacks, one more than Cowboys outside linebacker DeMarcus Ware.

When asked about his outside linebackers earlier this offseason, new defensive coordinator Vic Fangio offered a lukewarm assessment that ended with this admission: “We're searching.”

That search brings us back to Quinn, a projected top-10 draft pick who, at 265 pounds, ran the 40-yard dash in 4.57 seconds, had a vertical leap of 33 inches and posted a broad jump of 10 feet, 6 inches at his pro day. Big Freak, indeed.

During the NFL Combine, NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said of Quinn, “He's as good a natural pass rusher as I have ever seen.”

Texas A&M linebacker Von Miller, the draft's premier pass-rushing demon, will likely be off the board when the Niners pick at No. 7 and Quinn is widely regarded as the next best option.

The 49ers, however, would likely be envisioning Quinn as their long-awaited 3-4 outside linebacker. And it's believed that Quinn's ideal position in the NFL is defensive end.

“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

Beyond his position at the next level, there are other questions surrounding Quinn, who hasn't played a game in 16 months since he was declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA for accepting $5,642 in benefits from agent. Quinn, who only played two years in college, reportedly lied to NCAA and UNC officials about the gifts.

Despite that misstep, there aren't character concerns surrounding Quinn, 20, who came across as humble and genuinely remorseful in his meeting with the media at the combine.

“I made a selfish mistake and I paid a price for it,” Quinn said. “And my team and my family and coaches paid a price for it. I truly apologized for it.”

Of perhaps more concern to NFL teams is the fact that Quinn has a benign brain tumor, which was diagnosed when he was a senior at Fort Dorchester (S.C.) High School. He had surgery to reduce the fluid backup and was told he would never play sports again.

A few months later, however, he won his third straight state heavyweight wrestling title. As a freshman at UNC, he won the Brian Piccolo Award given to the ACC's most courageous player. Then, as a sophomore, he led the conference in tackles for loss (19) and ranked second in sacks (11).

Quinn, who says he hasn't a tumor-related headache since his surgery, still undergoes an MRI exam every six months to monitor the tumor.

Given his background, it's not surprising that a potential position switch in the NFL doesn't phase him.

Could he be an effective linebacker?

“Whatever I set my mind to,” Quinn said. “If they want me at free safety, I'm going to go play it for you. I really think I can.”

I didn't even think about Tamba Hali!
“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

This is the type of comment that worries me at times but if the 9ers play him as an end in the 4/3 and an OLB in the 3/4 it will be interesting to see how he does standing versus hand on the ground. I love his attitude--willing to play safety if that's what they want.

The comments by his DBs at NC are very encouraging--a sack so fast that they thought it was an offensive off-sides! They didn't have to cover for very long.

Another reason for picking him up--practice for the OLine for dealing with Ware, Hali, etc.
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

This is the type of comment that worries me at times but if the 9ers play him as an end in the 4/3 and an OLB in the 3/4 it will be interesting to see how he does standing versus hand on the ground. I love his attitude--willing to play safety if that's what they want.

The comments by his DBs at NC are very encouraging--a sack so fast that they thought it was an offensive off-sides! They didn't have to cover for very long.

Another reason for picking him up--practice for the OLine for dealing with Ware, Hali, etc.

Did you see this part?

Quote:
Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

DeMarcus Ware in 2010

66 Tackles
15.5 Sacks
2 Forced Fumbles

Tamba Hali in 2010

51 Tackles
14.5 Sacks
4 Forced Fumbles
[ Edited by PTulini on Apr 23, 2011 at 9:22 PM ]
Originally posted by PTulini:
Originally posted by PTulini:
Big Freak might help Niners' sack attack - Press Democrat



Quote:
By ERIC BRANCH
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Published: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.

How can a 6-foot-4, 265-pound defensive end help a secondary?

Just ask the defensive backs who played behind North Carolina's Robert Quinn, whose rare blend of size, strength and speed earned him the nicknames “Atlas” and “Big Freak” from his teammates.

“Just playing behind him you understand what he does for a defensive back,” North Carolina cornerback Duenta Williams said. “At (East Carolina) two years ago, he sacked a guy so fast that I thought it was false start on the offense or something. I thought they were about to start the play over again. Just situations like that, you didn't have to do too much covering.”

The 49ers have long been searching for a speed-rushing force that could harass quarterbacks and, in turn, mask breakdowns in the secondary. The Niners haven't had a player post more than 8½ sacks in a season since 2002 when Andre Carter had 12½. They have played primarily a 3-4 defense since 2005, but have yet to locate a pass-rushing outside linebacker that's vital to the scheme.

Last year, they used a four-man rotation at outside linebacker consisting of Parys Haralson, Manny Lawson, Travis LaBoy and Ahmad Brooks. The underwhelming quartet managed 16½ sacks, one more than Cowboys outside linebacker DeMarcus Ware.

When asked about his outside linebackers earlier this offseason, new defensive coordinator Vic Fangio offered a lukewarm assessment that ended with this admission: “We're searching.”

That search brings us back to Quinn, a projected top-10 draft pick who, at 265 pounds, ran the 40-yard dash in 4.57 seconds, had a vertical leap of 33 inches and posted a broad jump of 10 feet, 6 inches at his pro day. Big Freak, indeed.

During the NFL Combine, NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said of Quinn, “He's as good a natural pass rusher as I have ever seen.”

Texas A&M linebacker Von Miller, the draft's premier pass-rushing demon, will likely be off the board when the Niners pick at No. 7 and Quinn is widely regarded as the next best option.

The 49ers, however, would likely be envisioning Quinn as their long-awaited 3-4 outside linebacker. And it's believed that Quinn's ideal position in the NFL is defensive end.

“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

Beyond his position at the next level, there are other questions surrounding Quinn, who hasn't played a game in 16 months since he was declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA for accepting $5,642 in benefits from agent. Quinn, who only played two years in college, reportedly lied to NCAA and UNC officials about the gifts.

Despite that misstep, there aren't character concerns surrounding Quinn, 20, who came across as humble and genuinely remorseful in his meeting with the media at the combine.

“I made a selfish mistake and I paid a price for it,” Quinn said. “And my team and my family and coaches paid a price for it. I truly apologized for it.”

Of perhaps more concern to NFL teams is the fact that Quinn has a benign brain tumor, which was diagnosed when he was a senior at Fort Dorchester (S.C.) High School. He had surgery to reduce the fluid backup and was told he would never play sports again.

A few months later, however, he won his third straight state heavyweight wrestling title. As a freshman at UNC, he won the Brian Piccolo Award given to the ACC's most courageous player. Then, as a sophomore, he led the conference in tackles for loss (19) and ranked second in sacks (11).

Quinn, who says he hasn't a tumor-related headache since his surgery, still undergoes an MRI exam every six months to monitor the tumor.

Given his background, it's not surprising that a potential position switch in the NFL doesn't phase him.

Could he be an effective linebacker?

“Whatever I set my mind to,” Quinn said. “If they want me at free safety, I'm going to go play it for you. I really think I can.”

I didn't even think about Tamba Hali!

It's okay i blocked out last years loss to the cheifs too, are oline being owned all day even mike look like a rookie, and davis just got raped, in his game play and by another man that game!
Quote:
Eric_Branch: RT @lilo_lalo: who will you pick? Prince or robert quinn? >> Quinn. A bigger risk than Prince, but I'm betting he could be beastly 3-4 OLB.
Originally posted by PTulini:
Quote:
Eric_Branch: RT @lilo_lalo: who will you pick? Prince or robert quinn? >> Quinn. A bigger risk than Prince, but I'm betting he could be beastly 3-4 OLB.

I'm still on the Quinn band wagon but always like to worry every little factor until a decsion is made. That is part of the fun for me...angst!
Originally posted by PTulini:
Big Freak might help Niners' sack attack - Press Democrat



Quote:
By ERIC BRANCH
THE PRESS DEMOCRAT

Published: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.
Last Modified: Saturday, April 23, 2011 at 8:16 p.m.


How can a 6-foot-4, 265-pound defensive end help a secondary?

Just ask the defensive backs who played behind North Carolina's Robert Quinn, whose rare blend of size, strength and speed earned him the nicknames “Atlas” and “Big Freak” from his teammates.

“Just playing behind him you understand what he does for a defensive back,” North Carolina cornerback Duenta Williams said. “At (East Carolina) two years ago, he sacked a guy so fast that I thought it was false start on the offense or something. I thought they were about to start the play over again. Just situations like that, you didn't have to do too much covering.”

The 49ers have long been searching for a speed-rushing force that could harass quarterbacks and, in turn, mask breakdowns in the secondary. The Niners haven't had a player post more than 8½ sacks in a season since 2002 when Andre Carter had 12½. They have played primarily a 3-4 defense since 2005, but have yet to locate a pass-rushing outside linebacker that's vital to the scheme.

Last year, they used a four-man rotation at outside linebacker consisting of Parys Haralson, Manny Lawson, Travis LaBoy and Ahmad Brooks. The underwhelming quartet managed 16½ sacks, one more than Cowboys outside linebacker DeMarcus Ware.

When asked about his outside linebackers earlier this offseason, new defensive coordinator Vic Fangio offered a lukewarm assessment that ended with this admission: “We're searching.”

That search brings us back to Quinn, a projected top-10 draft pick who, at 265 pounds, ran the 40-yard dash in 4.57 seconds, had a vertical leap of 33 inches and posted a broad jump of 10 feet, 6 inches at his pro day. Big Freak, indeed.

During the NFL Combine, NFL Network draft analyst Mike Mayock said of Quinn, “He's as good a natural pass rusher as I have ever seen.”

Texas A&M linebacker Von Miller, the draft's premier pass-rushing demon, will likely be off the board when the Niners pick at No. 7 and Quinn is widely regarded as the next best option.

The 49ers, however, would likely be envisioning Quinn as their long-awaited 3-4 outside linebacker. And it's believed that Quinn's ideal position in the NFL is defensive end.

“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

Beyond his position at the next level, there are other questions surrounding Quinn, who hasn't played a game in 16 months since he was declared permanently ineligible by the NCAA for accepting $5,642 in benefits from agent. Quinn, who only played two years in college, reportedly lied to NCAA and UNC officials about the gifts.

Despite that misstep, there aren't character concerns surrounding Quinn, 20, who came across as humble and genuinely remorseful in his meeting with the media at the combine.

“I made a selfish mistake and I paid a price for it,” Quinn said. “And my team and my family and coaches paid a price for it. I truly apologized for it.”

Of perhaps more concern to NFL teams is the fact that Quinn has a benign brain tumor, which was diagnosed when he was a senior at Fort Dorchester (S.C.) High School. He had surgery to reduce the fluid backup and was told he would never play sports again.

A few months later, however, he won his third straight state heavyweight wrestling title. As a freshman at UNC, he won the Brian Piccolo Award given to the ACC's most courageous player. Then, as a sophomore, he led the conference in tackles for loss (19) and ranked second in sacks (11).

Quinn, who says he hasn't a tumor-related headache since his surgery, still undergoes an MRI exam every six months to monitor the tumor.

Given his background, it's not surprising that a potential position switch in the NFL doesn't phase him.

Could he be an effective linebacker?

“Whatever I set my mind to,” Quinn said. “If they want me at free safety, I'm going to go play it for you. I really think I can.”

So Quinn is nicknamed "Big Freak" and Greg Little is nicknamed "Freak" by their teammates. Looks like UNC is awarded "The Most Original Nicknamed Team". Thank God these guys jobs are playing football and not coming up with nicknames, or there would be 30+ guys nicknamed "Big Freak, Freak, Lil Freak, Freaky, LL Cool Freak, and Jam Master Freak" coming out of that school.
Is it fair to compare this big physical freak pass rusher to another another projected top 10 pick a years back....


Vernon Goldston????
Originally posted by SolRebe1:
Is it fair to compare this big physical freak pass rusher to another another projected top 10 pick a years back....


Vernon Goldston????

quinn is a better suited for 3-4 then him (and can also play 4-3)

also quinn has a good attitude and has an amazing motor
Originally posted by 49ersalldaway126:
Originally posted by SolRebe1:
Is it fair to compare this big physical freak pass rusher to another another projected top 10 pick a years back....


Vernon Goldston????

quinn is a better suited for 3-4 then him (and can also play 4-3)

also quinn has a good attitude and has an amazing motor

What makes Quinn better suited? Gholston went to OSU as a LB first then moved to DE, he's faster, stronger, had experience dropping into coverage some, and was more productive. Plus there's a large community of people who think Quinn is better suited for the 4-3, his HC Butch Davis included in that group.
So what exactly shows he "better suited for the 3-4" then Gholston?
Originally posted by PTulini:
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
“I do believe that he can be a good, or perhaps even very good, 3-4 rush linebacker,” CBS Sports draft analyst Rob Rang said. “But I believe he could be a Pro Bowl defensive end. That's where I see him as an ideal fit in the NFL.”

This is the type of comment that worries me at times but if the 9ers play him as an end in the 4/3 and an OLB in the 3/4 it will be interesting to see how he does standing versus hand on the ground. I love his attitude--willing to play safety if that's what they want.

The comments by his DBs at NC are very encouraging--a sack so fast that they thought it was an offensive off-sides! They didn't have to cover for very long.

Another reason for picking him up--practice for the OLine for dealing with Ware, Hali, etc.

Did you see this part?

Quote:
Of course, Ware and Kansas City's Tamba Hali are former college defensive ends with Quinn's dimensions that are starring as 3-4 outside linebackers in the NFL. Ware (6-4, 262 pounds) and Hali (6-3, 275) ranked first and second, respectively, in sacks in 2010.

DeMarcus Ware in 2010

66 Tackles
15.5 Sacks
2 Forced Fumbles

Tamba Hali in 2010

51 Tackles
14.5 Sacks
4 Forced Fumbles

I'm not sure how Hali is used but Ware rushes the passer on almost every passing down. When you're as dominant as he is you're okay with trading away some creativity.

I'm really hoping Cleveland takes Quinn at 6. I need to see more. 1 season as a starter 2 years ago and combine numbers just isn't enough to warrant such a high pick.
Originally posted by Travisty13:
Originally posted by 49ersalldaway126:
Originally posted by SolRebe1:
Is it fair to compare this big physical freak pass rusher to another another projected top 10 pick a years back....


Vernon Goldston????

quinn is a better suited for 3-4 then him (and can also play 4-3)

also quinn has a good attitude and has an amazing motor

What makes Quinn better suited? Gholston went to OSU as a LB first then moved to DE, he's faster, stronger, had experience dropping into coverage some, and was more productive. Plus there's a large community of people who think Quinn is better suited for the 4-3, his HC Butch Davis included in that group.
So what exactly shows he "better suited for the 3-4" then Gholston?

For one, I don't think Vernon Gholston had the necessary insticts to play the game. He could never just react to what was going on around him. He had to be told what to do, and he often looked lost.