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Team Conditioning Concerns

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Originally posted by CatchMaster80:
Conditioning may help win games in the 4th quarter but it doesn't prevent knee damage. It's just bad breaks. Maybe next year we will stay relatively healthy and be able to win 8-10 games. You really can't do much to strengthen a ligament without surgery. Sometimes they are actually stronger after surgery (Frank Gore). The rehab afterward is all about regaining muscle strength and flexibility. We lost our QB and starting RB on non contact injuries Kyle must feel like he is snake bit.



People want someone to blame. Fan are like people back in the caveman days trying to explain natural phenomena with ridiculous superstition. "Training camp was too soft." "Training camp was too hard." "The coaches are too mean." "The coaches are too nice." "The team doctors are dumb." "The players are too dumb to hydrate properly." "The weather was too hot." "The weather was too cold."



Blah...blah...blah. Injuries are generally a matter of luck. You see teams go from being one of the healthiest to one of the most injury ravaged in a year's time. What happened? Did everyone get soft? Dumb?


Non contact injuries especially are a matter of just plain dumb luck. You do a movement thousands of times, you get distracted, your body and mind are not on the same page, you get hurt. It is the reality of being a professional athlete. It sucks, but it is what it is.
Originally posted by TD49ers:
This is my thought as well along with a lack of understanding by the players to maintain a certain level of health both diet and physical. There is no question it is a physical sport but the injuries by the 49ers seems loop sided. Just watching the game yesterday, we had aleast 5-6 injury timeouts, the Chargers had zero.




No offense but this is a ridiculous assumption that you have no evidence for. Patrick Willis had his career cut short due to a series of foot injuries and in your mind, it was just a conditioning/diet/training issue?


Football is a brutal sport. There will be injuries, no matter how well conditioned you are, how hard you train and how many egg whites you pack away.
CJ Beathard has an adamantium skeleton.
[ Edited by VaBeachNiner on Oct 1, 2018 at 9:34 AM ]
seems like its every year now, we get broken more than we break other teams
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
No offense but this is a ridiculous assumption that you have no evidence for. Patrick Willis had his career cut short due to a series of foot injuries and in your mind, it was just a conditioning/diet/training issue?

Football is a brutal sport. There will be injuries, no matter how well conditioned you are, how hard you train and how many egg whites you pack away.

You are correct it is an assumption. I have no real trending data to justify my comment.

Patrick Willis had a relatively healthy career. His career was cut short because he did not want to play anymore. " did not have the passion anymore" and did not want to be a cripple in his retirement years. (2007-2013 he missed 5 games). By the way he played linebacker.

Since we are picking data points I will use Brady and Jerry Rice as those who have had long careers attributed to conditioning and diet. It does require some luck, genetics and type of player/position that may decide injuries but I find it hard to believe that conditioning and diet are irrelevant.
[ Edited by TD49ers on Oct 1, 2018 at 9:53 AM ]
It seems like most of these injuries are lower body. I wonder if this is a result of the NFL rule changes. Players are afraid to go after the upper body since they might be called for helmet to helmet, so instead they target the lower body. Honestly, after that text book tackle made on Beathard yesterday that was called "roughing the passer," I don't know what defenders are allowed to do anymore.
Originally posted by TD49ers:
You are correct it is an assumption. I have no real trending data to justify my comment.

Patrick Willis had a relatively healthy career. His career was cut short because he did not want to play anymore. " did not have the passion anymore" and did not want to be a cripple in his retirement years. (2007-2013 he missed 5 games). By the way he played linebacker.

Since we are picking data points I will use Brady and Jerry Rice as those who have had long careers attributed to conditioning and diet. It does require some luck, genetics and type of player/position that may decide injuries but I find it hard to believe that conditioning and diet are irrelevant.



Both guys who suffered season ending injuries. Were they just not conditioned enough those years? Skipping out on their multivitamins?



The bottomline, football is a rough sport. Injuries can happen no matter how tough you are or how conditioned you are. If anything, players might be overconditioned these days. Guys are bigger and faster than ever before and coaches and training staffs have less hands on time with players than ever before due to the CBA.


A few weeks back I was talking with a guy who played in the league in the late 80s/early 90s and one of the things we talked about was injuries. He said it was pretty common for a lot of guys to just shut it down for a few months after the season, heal up and then start working your way back in during mini camps.


Nowadays we have players training almost year round. The season is over and guys head off to Exos or some other facility where they work with third party trainers and not their own strength and conditioning staff.


Its just constant work and pounding on the body while pushing it to its limits in the most violent and physically taxing sport out there.
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
Both guys who suffered season ending injuries. Were they just not conditioned enough those years? Skipping out on their multivitamins?

The bottomline, football is a rough sport. Injuries can happen no matter how tough you are or how conditioned you are. If anything, players might be overconditioned these days. Guys are bigger and faster than ever before and coaches and training staffs have less hands on time with players than ever before due to the CBA.

A few weeks back I was talking with a guy who played in the league in the late 80s/early 90s and one of the things we talked about was injuries. He said it was pretty common for a lot of guys to just shut it down for a few months after the season, heal up and then start working your way back in during mini camps.

Nowadays we have players training almost year round. The season is over and guys head off to Exos or some other facility where they work with third party trainers and not their own strength and conditioning staff.

Its just constant work and pounding on the body while pushing it to its limits in the most violent and physically taxing sport out there.

Both Brady and Rice played or are playing into there 40's and missed minimal games over long careers. If we took those statistics and applied it to this team we would not have a list full of guys on IR and in shorts on the sidelines come gameday. Rice and to a point Brady played in a much more violent era of football. So to suggest that today is more taxing on the body may be not entirely accurate. Athletes today have the benefit of technology and science to fine tune their performance. The question is whether it is being used properly or at all. I not suggesting injuries should not happen. Its clear that the game of football is violent and is inherent to injuries. I am challenging whether the 49ers organization is doing the right amount or balance of conditioning/diet with their players because in the past 4 games, our players are on the ground alot; definitely more than the other team. The entire OL aside from Tomlinson is out or battling a major injury that makes them 50% starter for next week. The DB position, whom are mostly young....starters from week 1, all are out accept for Whitherspoon (we are in week 4). Is this attributed to the violence of the game? I don't buy what your selling, a factor but not the only cause.
Too much coco puffs is making their ligaments weak
  • dj43
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Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
Football is a brutal sport. There will be injuries, no matter how well conditioned you are, how hard you train and how many egg whites you pack away.

this

One of the headline stories this morning is the injury to Earl Thomas and Le'veon Bell's response to it: Players are well aware of the risk of injury and do whatever they can to avoid it. They also do whatever they can to protect themselves from the inevitability of losing earning time due to injury, including staying out of camp if the do not have a long-term contract that protects them in case of injury. As Bell said, "I will continue to be the 'bad guy,'" so that others will get the long-term contract they need.

Look around the NFL this morning. Injuries abound. The Seahawks not only lost Thomas for the season, they also lost rookie TE Will Dissly who was becoming an important part in their offense. They are just one example.

Football IS a brutal sport and players get injured despite the many precautions taken. Teams spend million$ on technology to protect their investment in players, yet players still get hurt. It is a bummer when your own team gets hit but it is inevitable.

TOFU IS SOFT, STOP EATING TOFU!
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
Originally posted by TD49ers:
You are correct it is an assumption. I have no real trending data to justify my comment.

Patrick Willis had a relatively healthy career. His career was cut short because he did not want to play anymore. " did not have the passion anymore" and did not want to be a cripple in his retirement years. (2007-2013 he missed 5 games). By the way he played linebacker.

Since we are picking data points I will use Brady and Jerry Rice as those who have had long careers attributed to conditioning and diet. It does require some luck, genetics and type of player/position that may decide injuries but I find it hard to believe that conditioning and diet are irrelevant.


Both guys who suffered season ending injuries. Were they just not conditioned enough those years? Skipping out on their multivitamins?

The bottomline, football is a rough sport. Injuries can happen no matter how tough you are or how conditioned you are. If anything, players might be overconditioned these days. Guys are bigger and faster than ever before and coaches and training staffs have less hands on time with players than ever before due to the CBA.

A few weeks back I was talking with a guy who played in the league in the late 80s/early 90s and one of the things we talked about was injuries. He said it was pretty common for a lot of guys to just shut it down for a few months after the season, heal up and then start working your way back in during mini camps.

Nowadays we have players training almost year round. The season is over and guys head off to Exos or some other facility where they work with third party trainers and not their own strength and conditioning staff.

Its just constant work and pounding on the body while pushing it to its limits in the most violent and physically taxing sport out there.

I know Brady's diet was key in his knee injury. Too much Bernard Pollard in his diet.

Jerry had too much Sapp in his diet.
It's not the injuries. It is the fact that fans overrated the depth on this team. Other than DL and RB and possibly OL, our depth sucks so bad to the point where we cannot sustain injuries.

Look at DAL, lost OL and they have no WRs and their MLB is hurt. They are sustaining it.

Add schedule and there you go.
Originally posted by dj43:
this

One of the headline stories this morning is the injury to Earl Thomas and Le'veon Bell's response to it: Players are well aware of the risk of injury and do whatever they can to avoid it. They also do whatever they can to protect themselves from the inevitability of losing earning time due to injury, including staying out of camp if the do not have a long-term contract that protects them in case of injury. As Bell said, "I will continue to be the 'bad guy,'" so that others will get the long-term contract they need.

Look around the NFL this morning. Injuries abound. The Seahawks not only lost Thomas for the season, they also lost rookie TE Will Dissly who was becoming an important part in their offense. They are just one example.

Football IS a brutal sport and players get injured despite the many precautions taken. Teams spend million$ on technology to protect their investment in players, yet players still get hurt. It is a bummer when your own team gets hit but it is inevitable.

Not so sure teams spend millions on conditioning, maybe in the form of weights and cardio equipment but I would suggest that they are not paying attention to any other metrics. Why would Brady choose to completely turn his back on BB and get his own trainer/dietitian? If I had to guess, NFL teams are still living in 1980 when it comes to training and conditioning.
Our team is soft... well except for CJ
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