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Offseason All22 Film Study

  • thl408
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Originally posted by Niners816:
Originally posted by thl408:
Zone blocking adjusts to slants and last second shifts better than man/power blocking concepts. It's up to the OLmen to quickly think on the fly, but there are rules in place to allow for the adjustments to be made. Can shifts and slants screw up blocking assignments? Sure, if the OLmen aren't quick thinking, but not because zone blocking rules doesn't have a way to adjust.

A basic rule is if there is a DLman lined up across from the OLman, that OLman is considered 'covered'. If covered, block that DLman, simple. If the OLman is uncovered, combo block with an adjacent OLman to the playside. If the defense slants right after the snap, and the covered/uncovered designation changes, adjust accordingly. If the defense shifts right before the snap, then the adjustment is made immediately before the snap, without communication. That's where chemistry and familiarity comes in. Alex Gibbs was a proponent of running just outside zone and that's it. Nothing else. All to build cohesiveness and chemistry along the OL.

If you look at the changes formation wise elder Shanny did when going to Denver it's pretty apparent it had this OZ blocking scheme in mind. Our horizontal stacked forms (split, far, near) became more I based forms (strong and weak). I'd imagine this was so the back would be 7 yards of the LOS abs therefore have more time to read the defenders.

If you think about it, it a perfect marriage for a WCO passing attack. Not only do you have a run game exploiting the outside, but mostly all passing concepts have a similar outside flat attack. This emphasis on outside the numbers makes the defense compensate and this compensation opens up the down hill running and the drag/in cutting routes.
Nothing says "downhill" more than an I formation. The death of the split back formations imo coincided with the evolution of the slot WR, and the linebackers getting faster and faster. It used to be easier to run to the sidelines. Now linebackers are faster than some RBs, and way faster than OLmen. I believe it was Holmgren that saw this and put an end to the split back formations that Walsh used so often.

A horizontal running game does compliment a WCO passing game. When a defense over compensates one way, attach the other. All short range for that high percentage WCO stuff. Then the defense creeps up to compensate for the short range stuff, take a shot deep.
Originally posted by thl408:
Nothing says "downhill" more than an I formation. The death of the split back formations imo coincided with the evolution of the slot WR, and the linebackers getting faster and faster. It used to be easier to run to the sidelines. Now linebackers are faster than some RBs, and way faster than OLmen. I believe it was Holmgren that saw this and put an end to the split back formations that Walsh used so often.

A horizontal running game does compliment a WCO passing game. When a defense over compensates one way, attach the other. All short range for that high percentage WCO stuff. Then the defense creeps up to compensate for the short range stuff, take a shot deep.

I always wondered when Shanny started developing this attack. Because in 1994, we were still very much a dive, trap, draw, power, sweep team out of flat stacked formations. By 1995, he was this strong and weak I attack with the OZ ground game.
  • Giedi
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Originally posted by thl408:
Nothing says "downhill" more than an I formation. The death of the split back formations imo coincided with the evolution of the slot WR, and the linebackers getting faster and faster. It used to be easier to run to the sidelines. Now linebackers are faster than some RBs, and way faster than OLmen. I believe it was Holmgren that saw this and put an end to the split back formations that Walsh used so often.

A horizontal running game does compliment a WCO passing game. When a defense over compensates one way, attach the other. All short range for that high percentage WCO stuff. Then the defense creeps up to compensate for the short range stuff, take a shot deep.

Kyle's offense is very well designed. Whereas I think Harbaugh's offense isn't so well designed. In my mind operating a run first punishing offense that Harbaugh runs -- relies on powerful O LInemen (real hard to draft them unless you draft top quarter of the draft every season) and the fact that it's run first vs pass first. I think NFL rules favors the pass vs the run. I'm impressed how the Zone run works with the WCO. Now, his father did well, my hope is that Kyle will be better than his dad. We can only hope! We shall see...
....
[ Edited by Niners816 on May 31, 2017 at 5:25 PM ]
Originally posted by thl408:
Nothing says "downhill" more than an I formation. The death of the split back formations imo coincided with the evolution of the slot WR, and the linebackers getting faster and faster. It used to be easier to run to the sidelines. Now linebackers are faster than some RBs, and way faster than OLmen. I believe it was Holmgren that saw this and put an end to the split back formations that Walsh used so often.

A horizontal running game does compliment a WCO passing game. When a defense over compensates one way, attach the other. All short range for that high percentage WCO stuff. Then the defense creeps up to compensate for the short range stuff, take a shot deep.

I'm curious Thl408, would you have preferred Mike Shanahan over Kyle as head coach? I do understand you were not part of the hiring process!
[ Edited by jeepzilla on May 31, 2017 at 5:30 PM ]
  • thl408
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Originally posted by jeepzilla:
I'm curious Thl408, would you have preferred Mike Shanahan over Kyle as head coach? I do understand you were not part of the hiring process!
Give me the young, hungry coach.
yo THL, how much would you say of Seattle's secondary concepts are comprised of spot dropping and/or pattern matching? I figured you'd know best since you've been putting in the time watching their all-22.

Sometimes I watch them play and have trouble trying to discern whether their LBs/CBs are pattern matching or playing really disciplined zone defense, especially when their CBs are bailing.
[ Edited by Heroism on May 31, 2017 at 10:13 PM ]
  • thl408
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Originally posted by Heroism:
yo THL, how much would you say of Seattle's secondary concepts are comprised of spot dropping and/or pattern matching? I figured you'd know best since you've been putting in the time watching their all-22.

Sometimes I watch them play and have trouble trying to discern whether their LBs/CBs are pattern matching or playing really disciplined zone defense, especially when their CBs are bailing.
If I had to estimate, I'd say they pattern match, in some way, most of the time. I can't say I've paid attention a lot to the 15/16 seagulls though. That film is hard to watch from a 49er fan view so I didn't view those games closely. In those 13-14 seasons they were so deadly with that pass rush often times I don't think the matching got to take place as the QB was getting rid of the ball quick.
Yeah, their DL is pretty freaken good still.

Frank Clark is an animal.
[ Edited by Heroism on May 31, 2017 at 10:29 PM ]
Frank Clark is a very good player and only drafted 63.

  • thl408
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Going through the 2016 49ers/Falcons to tire myself out for a long flight tomorrow. A few random plays to show off some of Kyle's pass play designs. This game sucked to watch the first time around but now that Kyle's on our side, it's fun to watch.

1Q: 2&10
Triangle stretch vs Cover2 Zone. Many ways to create a triangle stretch and a creative play designer will come up with creative ways.
Orange + Yellow for the vertical stretch. Yellow + Red for the horizontal stretch


Playaction to suck in blue.


Red's deep Out occupies red safety. Orange's route keeps blue LB shallow for Yellow to vertically stretch blue's zone.


+20
  • thl408
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The route that scored above, and how it was isolated to the field side looks very familiar (yellow route below).
Below is Kyle's CLE offense. In a redzone situation where space is tight, Kyle is able to scheme a WR into having an entire half of the end zone to work his route. (play below was shown earlier in the thread)


  • thl408
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2Q 1st & 10
Kyle will also run playaction from shotgun.


Entire DL flows to its right due to playaction.


QB's first read is to orange. What this also does as the QB looks at orange, is pull the defenders further towards that side of the field, opening up Yellow. btw that's RRobinson mugging orange, no separation.


+20
  • thl408
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It's as if Kyle calls this play once per game and it always works. That throw across the field to the sneaky TE. Here, using 13 personnel to look run heavy.
vs Quarters (I think)


Playaction gets the DL flowing to its right, then the QB bootleg right gets the DBs looking to their left. Robinson passes off coverage and is shown here stopping to look for any threats to his zone. Doesn't see one.


Robinson continues to gain depth and eventually vacates the area the sneaky TE will attack.


+30
  • thl408
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An example of isolation of RB on LB. Red motions across the formation and a CB follows, man coverage.


Orange slant creates a partial pick/rub on the LB assigned to cover the RB out of the backfield. Purple clears the sidelines.


Easy throw, easy catch, run. Easy +10
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