There are 53 users in the forums

Remember
Not a member? Register Now!

Your playing surface preference for the New Stadium

Your playing surface preference for the New Stadium

Just make a giant field of mattresses!
Originally posted by jcashen87:
SO many sissy people commenting on that article too, saying its a conspiracy against high flying pass happy teams. Geez, the Arena Football League wants its fans back.

LOL, this. That is the direction the NFL seems to be heading in unfortunately.
Complaining about playing gridiron on grass, talk about fail.
Originally posted by ace49ers:
Complaining about playing gridiron on grass, talk about fail.

Once football gets more pussified than soccer, I'm out, going to go and become a FC Barcelona fan.
Artificial turf is not safer than grass IMO. The only time I have ever seen a player tear ligaments in both knees was on artificial turf and there was no contact on the play.
Uniform surfaces should be an NFL rule. I remember when Garrison Hearst injured himself the first play of the game against the Falcons in the playoffs (8 yard gain btw), his foot got caught in one of the seams on the carpet. That might have cost us another Super Bowl. Keep it natural, no domes, no artificial surfaces.
Cactus
Originally posted by RishikeshA:
Uniform surfaces should be an NFL rule. I remember when Garrison Hearst injured himself the first play of the game against the Falcons in the playoffs (8 yard gain btw), his foot got caught in one of the seams on the carpet. That might have cost us another Super Bowl. Keep it natural, no domes, no artificial surfaces.


No way we beat Cunningham, Moss, Carter at Minnesota that year.
Originally posted by HudsonValley:
Originally posted by RishikeshA:
Uniform surfaces should be an NFL rule. I remember when Garrison Hearst injured himself the first play of the game against the Falcons in the playoffs (8 yard gain btw), his foot got caught in one of the seams on the carpet. That might have cost us another Super Bowl. Keep it natural, no domes, no artificial surfaces.


No way we beat Cunningham, Moss, Carter at Minnesota that year.


i agree, they were unreal that year and bryant young had broken his leg.
Originally posted by crabman82:
Originally posted by HudsonValley:
Originally posted by RishikeshA:
Uniform surfaces should be an NFL rule. I remember when Garrison Hearst injured himself the first play of the game against the Falcons in the playoffs (8 yard gain btw), his foot got caught in one of the seams on the carpet. That might have cost us another Super Bowl. Keep it natural, no domes, no artificial surfaces.


No way we beat Cunningham, Moss, Carter at Minnesota that year.


i agree, they were unreal that year and bryant young had broken his leg.


Atlanta beat them with Chris Chandler. I'm sure Steve and a healthy Garrison Hearst would have given them a decent shot.
Hot lava.
College football players suffer knee injuries about 40 percent more often when playing on an artificial surface compared to when they're playing on grass, according to a new study.

"We thought it was interesting because many universities are switching to the new generation artificial turf," said Dr. Jason Dragoo, the study's lead author and a professor at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dragoo said turf provides a more consistent playing field, and is expected to deliver better performance, but it has not been considered any less safe than grass.

"This doesn't say there's conclusive evidence that turf increases the injury rate, but maybe we can say it's not as safe as we thought it was," Dragoo told Reuters Health.

The findings, published in The American Journal of Sports Medicine, were part of a study looking back on knee injuries among college football players to see when they might be most vulnerable to getting hurt.

Dragoo and his colleagues note in their report that football is the leading cause of sports-related injuries in the U.S.

"The bottom line is anything we can get from these statistics will help us understand why players are getting these injuries and what we can do about it," Dragoo said.

The research team examined cases of tears to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) in the knee that were reported to the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) Injury Surveillance System.

The surveillance system includes about 10 percent of schools in the NCAA, and the study period spanned the 2004-2009 playing seasons.

Dragoo's group found 318 injuries to the ACL during those seasons, which translated to a rate of 14 injuries for every 100,000 "exposures." Each time a player practiced, scrimmaged or played a game was counted as one exposure.

ACL injuries were 10 times more common during games than during practices, and close to five times as common during scrimmages than during regular practice.

Athletes were also 1.39 times as likely to be injured when playing on modern artificial turf as they were when playing on grass.

The newer types of artificial playing fields are called infill surfaces. They have a layer of synthetic grass over a field of rubberized pellets called fill.

There were close to 18 injuries for every 100,000 exposures among athletes playing on infill surfaces, compared to 14 injuries for every 100,000 practices or games that took place on artificial turf without fill or on natural grass.

Dr. James Bradley, the chief orthopedic surgeon for the Pittsburgh Steelers and a clinical professor at the University of Pittsburgh, said the findings support what's also been observed in the National Football League.

"What the problem is, we think, is the shoe-surface interface," Bradley told Reuters Health.

Players are able to get a better grip on turf than on grass -- perhaps too good a grip, Dragoo explained.

"So if you are in the wrong position, because your leg doesn't give way as it does on grass, it can distribute that force to your knee and cause an injury," he said.

Bradley said the NFL is working with shoe makers to try to design footwear that can mimic the grip that players get on grass.

"You can change the molding patterns on the shoe to decrease" friction, Bradley said.

Dragoo said specialized footwear would help, along with ACL injury prevention training.

"The way that you move and the way that you pivot and change direction will determine your risk of having an ACL tear. So even if we do have increased risk on the turf with the shoes, we can modify that by making sure that the athletes are moving right," Dragoo said.


Read more: http://www.foxnews.com/health/2012/04/30/football-knee-injuries-likelier-on-artificial-turf-than-grass/#ixzz2HRevrFxY
it'll be that half grass, half turf s**t. It's cheaper to maintain than natural grass and as we all know, it's about money.
Originally posted by ChazBoner:
it'll be that half grass, half turf s**t. It's cheaper to maintain than natural grass and as we all know, it's about money.

It is either grass or it is artificial turf, no?
Applesauce