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Was Antonio langham our worst FA signing ever?

Was he?
Wasn't Lawrence Phillips a FA signing? I don't see how anyone could compete with him.


/thread
Damn I forgot about him
The best and worst free agent signings in 49ers history

http://blog.sfgate.com/49ers/2012/03/22/the-best-and-worst-free-agent-signings-in-49ers-history/



BEST FREE AGENT SIGNINGS

Ray Brown G (1996)

Gentleman Ray was nasty on the field and solidified the line during his six seasons with the team. Late offensive line coach Bobb McKittrick said that you'd want Brown at a State Dinner and also in a back alley brawl.


Tim McDonald S (1993)

McDonald was one of the defendants in the case against the NFL to open up free agency. He was also the first unrestricted free agent the team signed, and he lead the defense during his eight years in San Francisco.


Deion Sanders CB (1994)

Prime Time only spent one year with the team, but what a year. His talent was utterly transcendent and who could forget his grudge match with then Falcon receiver Andre Rison, when Sanders picked off a pass right in front of him and then raced down the sidelines taunting his former Atlanta teammates. The 49ers also happened to win a Super Bowl that season.



Charlie Garner RB (1999)

Garner filled a crucial two-year gap with the 49ers by gaining 2,371 yards and scoring 11 touchdowns in his highly productive stint. He was also fun to watch.



Ken Norton Jr. LB (1994)

Norton was signed from the Cowboys and became the man in the middle for the team's superior defense. He led the team in tackles for seven consecutive seasons.



Garrison Hearst RB (1997)

Signed from the Bengals, Hearst set a then-team record with a 1,502 yard season in 1999. He later broke his ankle in a playoff game against Atlanta and was shelved for two seasons. Hearst did come back in 2001 and rushed for 1,206 yards, which was probably the greatest comeback in 49ers history.



Carlos Rogers CB (2011)

Became the player the 49ers hoped Nate Clements would become when they signed him to a deal with $20 million guaranteed in 2007. Rogers signed a one-year contract and set a personal best with six interceptions, which earned him a long-term deal this offseason.'



Justin Smith DE (2008)

Smith keeps getting better with age. He might have just turned in his best season of his career in 2011 and his work ethic is widely emulated throughout the locker room.



Gary Plummer LB (1994)

Solidified the linebacking corps with his leadership and run stopping ability after signing from San Diego.



Jeff Garcia QB (1999)

Unearthed by Bill Walsh, who brought the smallish Garcia down from Calgary of the CFL. He had the unenviable task of following Joe Montana and Steve Young, and he did so splendidly considering the team was beginning to crumble around him.





WORST FREE AGENT SIGNINGS

Fred Weary CB (2003)

Remember him after he signed from the Falcons? Don't worry nobody else does either.



J.T. O'Sullivan QB (2008)

Beloved by then-offensive coordinator Mike Martz, O'Sullivan alienated the press corps, the P.R. staff and many of his teammates with his prickly personality. After a rash of interceptions he was later benched and then he left at the end of the season.



Ashley Lelie WR (2007)

Signed after getting suspended by then-Denver coach Mike Shanahan during a contract squabble, Lelie was supposed to stretch the defense. The only thing he did was stretch the 49ers' pocket book. He lasted one year before fleeing to the Raiders.



Johnnie Morton WR (2005)

Once signed, it became painfully evident that the 13-year player had no speed. He struggled through the season and caught 21 passes. He later suffered further embarrassment in 2007 when he tried mixed martial arts and was quickly knocked out by German comedian Bernard Ackah.



Jonas Jennings LT (2005)

The former Bill said he was Rollin' with Nolan (referring to former coach Mike Nolan) during his introductory news conference. What followed was poor play and a series of ankle and knee injuries that had his own teammates questioning his toughness.



Antonio Langham CB (1998)

The former Alabama star was signed for five years and $17 million after four years with Cleveland/Baltimore. He then started 11 games with the 49ers and completely lost his confidence, giving up five touchdowns and eight pass-interference penalties.



Mark McMillian CB (1999)

Billed as a tough little corner (he was 5-7), McMillian didn't practice or play hard after signing a three-year deal and was released after six games.



Gabe Wilkins DE (1998)

Wilkins was big and athletic and signed a deal worth $20 million. Billed as the next Reggie White, Wilkins was slowed by a knee injury and left the team two years later with grand total of two sacks.



Johnny Johnson RB (1996)

The 49ers signed Johnson to a two-year, $3 million deal and had to cut defensive end Dennis Brown to do it. After filing the paperwork with the league, the former Santa Cruz High and San Jose State star reneged and never showed up.



Lawrence Phillips RB (1998)

Phillips was signed at the behest of Bill Walsh. He missed a blitz pickup that caused Steve Young's career-ending concussion. He was suspended by mid-season and then released at the end of the season.
  • Garcia
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 26,531
JONAS f**kING JENNINGS LOL
"In 1996, the 49ers went hard after transition free agent Rodney Hampton of the New York Giants. Carmen Policy devised an offer that was structured in such a way that it would be almost impossible for the Giants to match.

Policy even publicly stated that Hampton was committed to the team and that he had his heart set on heading out west.

The Giants re-signed Hampton, the 'Niners were left with egg on their face, and their desperation for a running back hit critical mass.

Johnny Johnson is a bit of an enigma to say the least. Johnson earned Pro-Bowl honors in his first season with the Phoenix Cardinals. After three solid seasons, the Cardinals traded him to the New York Jets to move up one spot and the right to draft Garrison Hearst in the 1993 draft.

Johnson earned MVP honors from his teammates on the Jets in 1993 and led the team in both rushing and receiving. The Jets released Johnson following the 1994 season, in what was described as a salary cap move.

After having not played in 1995, the 49ers signed Johnson to a two-year deal for three million dollars that included a guaranteed signing bonus of $500,000.

"He's got himself in the type of condition and mental frame of mind that I think he's really going to contribute to our club," Seifert said at the time.

Citing a chronic back condition, Johnson never made a practice and was released prior to the start of the regular season."
  • Garcia
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 26,531
Originally posted by KEGster:
"In 1996, the 49ers went hard after transition free agent Rodney Hampton of the New York Giants. Carmen Policy devised an offer that was structured in such a way that it would be almost impossible for the Giants to match.

Policy even publicly stated that Hampton was committed to the team and that he had his heart set on heading out west.

The Giants re-signed Hampton, the 'Niners were left with egg on their face, and their desperation for a running back hit critical mass.

Johnny Johnson is a bit of an enigma to say the least. Johnson earned Pro-Bowl honors in his first season with the Phoenix Cardinals. After three solid seasons, the Cardinals traded him to the New York Jets to move up one spot and the right to draft Garrison Hearst in the 1993 draft.

Johnson earned MVP honors from his teammates on the Jets in 1993 and led the team in both rushing and receiving. The Jets released Johnson following the 1994 season, in what was described as a salary cap move.

After having not played in 1995, the 49ers signed Johnson to a two-year deal for three million dollars that included a guaranteed signing bonus of $500,000.

"He's got himself in the type of condition and mental frame of mind that I think he's really going to contribute to our club," Seifert said at the time.

Citing a chronic back condition, Johnson never made a practice and was released prior to the start of the regular season."

any parents with the last name johnson to name their kid 'johnathan on john' should be slapped.
  • IT21
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 12,095
Originally posted by boast:


/thread

this
Umm, Brandon Jacobs? Wasted money, time and was a locker room distraction until he were forced to put him on suspension then cut him.
Originally posted by KEGster:
The best and worst free agent signings in 49ers history

http://blog.sfgate.com/49ers/2012/03/22/the-best-and-worst-free-agent-signings-in-49ers-history/



BEST FREE AGENT SIGNINGS

Ray Brown G (1996)
Gentleman Ray was nasty on the field and solidified the line during his six seasons with the team. Late offensive line coach Bobb McKittrick said that you'd want Brown at a State Dinner and also in a back alley brawl.

Tim McDonald S (1993)
McDonald was one of the defendants in the case against the NFL to open up free agency. He was also the first unrestricted free agent the team signed, and he lead the defense during his eight years in San Francisco.

Deion Sanders CB (1994)
Prime Time only spent one year with the team, but what a year. His talent was utterly transcendent and who could forget his grudge match with then Falcon receiver Andre Rison, when Sanders picked off a pass right in front of him and then raced down the sidelines taunting his former Atlanta teammates. The 49ers also happened to win a Super Bowl that season.

Charlie Garner RB (1999)
Garner filled a crucial two-year gap with the 49ers by gaining 2,371 yards and scoring 11 touchdowns in his highly productive stint. He was also fun to watch.

Ken Norton Jr. LB (1994)
Norton was signed from the Cowboys and became the man in the middle for the team's superior defense. He led the team in tackles for seven consecutive seasons.

Garrison Hearst RB (1997)
Signed from the Bengals, Hearst set a then-team record with a 1,502 yard season in 1999. He later broke his ankle in a playoff game against Atlanta and was shelved for two seasons. Hearst did come back in 2001 and rushed for 1,206 yards, which was probably the greatest comeback in 49ers history.

Carlos Rogers CB (2011)
Became the player the 49ers hoped Nate Clements would become when they signed him to a deal with $20 million guaranteed in 2007. Rogers signed a one-year contract and set a personal best with six interceptions, which earned him a long-term deal this offseason.'

Justin Smith DE (2008)
Smith keeps getting better with age. He might have just turned in his best season of his career in 2011 and his work ethic is widely emulated throughout the locker room.

Gary Plummer LB (1994)
Solidified the linebacking corps with his leadership and run stopping ability after signing from San Diego.

Jeff Garcia QB (1999)
Unearthed by Bill Walsh, who brought the smallish Garcia down from Calgary of the CFL. He had the unenviable task of following Joe Montana and Steve Young, and he did so splendidly considering the team was beginning to crumble around him.


WORST FREE AGENT SIGNINGS

Fred Weary CB (2003)
Remember him after he signed from the Falcons? Don't worry nobody else does either.

J.T. O'Sullivan QB (2008)
Beloved by then-offensive coordinator Mike Martz, O'Sullivan alienated the press corps, the P.R. staff and many of his teammates with his prickly personality. After a rash of interceptions he was later benched and then he left at the end of the season.

Ashley Lelie WR (2007)
Signed after getting suspended by then-Denver coach Mike Shanahan during a contract squabble, Lelie was supposed to stretch the defense. The only thing he did was stretch the 49ers' pocket book. He lasted one year before fleeing to the Raiders.

Johnnie Morton WR (2005)
Once signed, it became painfully evident that the 13-year player had no speed. He struggled through the season and caught 21 passes. He later suffered further embarrassment in 2007 when he tried mixed martial arts and was quickly knocked out by German comedian Bernard Ackah.

Jonas Jennings LT (2005)
The former Bill said he was Rollin' with Nolan (referring to former coach Mike Nolan) during his introductory news conference. What followed was poor play and a series of ankle and knee injuries that had his own teammates questioning his toughness.

Antonio Langham CB (1998)
The former Alabama star was signed for five years and $17 million after four years with Cleveland/Baltimore. He then started 11 games with the 49ers and completely lost his confidence, giving up five touchdowns and eight pass-interference penalties.

Mark McMillian CB (1999)
Billed as a tough little corner (he was 5-7), McMillian didn't practice or play hard after signing a three-year deal and was released after six games.

Gabe Wilkins DE (1998)
Wilkins was big and athletic and signed a deal worth $20 million. Billed as the next Reggie White, Wilkins was slowed by a knee injury and left the team two years later with grand total of two sacks.

Johnny Johnson RB (1996)
The 49ers signed Johnson to a two-year, $3 million deal and had to cut defensive end Dennis Brown to do it. After filing the paperwork with the league, the former Santa Cruz High and San Jose State star reneged and never showed up.

Lawrence Phillips RB (1998)
Phillips was signed at the behest of Bill Walsh. He missed a blitz pickup that caused Steve Young's career-ending concussion. He was suspended by mid-season and then released at the end of the season.


You forgot a few:
Best:
Tim Harris -- A very good pass rusher and helped us win a ring.
Rickey Jackson -- Helped us win a ring.
Cris Doleman -- Was still a good pass rusher.
Rod Woodson -- He was still a good player.
Kevin Green -- Hell of a pass rusher, but we played him only in spot duty for some reason. Still don't get it.
Tony Parrish -- A force of a player on a bad team.
Isaac Bruce -- An excellent free agent signing. Excellent player.
Larry Allen -- Larry freak'in Allen. Still a dominant force in his last years.
Kevin Gogan -- Really helped out our line for a few years.
Walt Harris -- Very good player, made a pro-bowl. Great signing.


Worst:
Sammy Davis -- This one is one of the worst. He was actually so bad it was funny and his personality was also funny. He would bite on double moves more than a dog waiting for you to throw a frisbee.

Disagree with:
Jonas Jennings -- He was a very good player, but he was always hurt. At the time, we really needed a left tackle.
Johnny Morton -- I thought he did pretty good job for a veteran player considering the team we had at the time. It's not like we signed him for big money.
JT O'Sullivan -- He was brought in to compete as a backup. He won the starting job; which is not his fault. We were paying him the league minimum I think. If anything, it was a pretty darn good signing when you consider his salary.
[ Edited by BrianGO on Jan 22, 2013 at 4:14 AM ]
  • titan
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 2,600
LMAO....Jonas Jennings! We kept forgiving that guy cause he was so fat and huge hoping he would pay some kind of dividends. Lawrence Philips is by far our worse signing. Heck he got Steve Young killed!
  • titan
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 2,600
Double post
[ Edited by titan on Jan 22, 2013 at 4:22 AM ]
  • fip24
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 750
I was going to vote for Gabe WIlkens, but I didn't realize that Lawrence Phillips missed a blitz that got Steve Young hurt. It has to be Phillips.

Oh yea and I'll say it one more time.. Steve Young in the most under-rated HOF player of all-time. In my book, guy is a top 10 all-time QB
  • BobS
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 7,669
Originally posted by Psinex:
Wasn't Lawrence Phillips a FA signing? I don't see how anyone could compete with him.

I think Phillips was given a contract close to league minimum, Langham scored some big bucks (at the time)