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Are the Niners going to be predictable??

cant you say that about any team?
No we wont be. JH is no Singletary or Nolan.
Originally posted by susweel:
I think JH is smarter then that.

He's going to create a sweet playbook to use colins skills!
Hope not we nead points in the bay but rrrrr qb ? How baute Vince young
Originally posted by chingon49:
Hope not we nead points in the bay but rrrrr qb ? How baute Vince young

You can say that about any coach in the NFL...

/thread
This is kind of a silly topic. Just because teams saw Stanford run a system that we will run a modified version of, doesnt mean we are going to be predictable. LOL. The more I think about this, the more retarded of a question it is.

Doesnt everyone know what kind of offense the Patriots or Colts run? The Saints? Packers? On the complete other end, doesnt everyone know what kind of offense Browns run? The Raiders? Ravens?

Trust me, all coaches know what kind of system their opponent runs. The thought of us giving away our system to other coaches by means of them watching Stanford tapes is pretty laughable.
Originally posted by chingon49:
Hope not we nead points in the bay but rrrrr qb ? How baute Vince young

Howe boute wee make a desition too start Kolen Kapernik
But anyway, if we're going to be predictable we damn sure aren't going to be as predictable as last season, where about 90% of the offense was Gore up the middle
http://www.rakesofmallow.com/2010/9/23/1706624/stanford-at-notre-dame-cardinal-scouting-report

The Stanford Cardinal offense is an interesting case. On the one hand, they look dominant and controlling in the box score. No team has slowed them down, and they have made few mistakes. On the other hand, the game tape reveals a basic offense centered around a modified West Coast passing attack. This is not the ground and pound rushing attack that Notre Dame saw a year ago. Instead, Stanford runs out an incredible variety of formations that are designed to confuse defenses and give QB Andrew Luck the easiest reads possible.

This is not a run-first team. Stanford uses the pass to set up the run. Then, when the game is under control, they pound the ball at opposing defenses. In their first game, against Sacramento State, Luck was 14/18 passing in the first half and then 3/5 in the second half (the backup QB was 0/1). In their second game, against UCLA, Luck was 9/18 in the first half and then 2/6 in the second half. In their third game, against Wake Forest, Luck was 15/19 in the first half and then 2/4 in the second half (backup QBs were 3/5). So, while the final run/pass ratios suggest that Stanford is a run-first team, a deeper look at the stats show that dominant first halves this season have allowed them to control the clock with the run in the second halves.

Andrew Luck is not a great thrower. Overall, he is a very good QB but not great at throwing the football. The guy never makes mistakes. His throws, while sometimes bad, are always in a place that only his WR can catch them. He rarely throws into tight coverage. Luck is quick. He isn't afraid to tuck and run if the pass isn't there. He has a few 10+ yard scrambles this season. Stanford will run the option with him, but not often. It appears that he has some leeway at the line to make audibles or at least adjustments; they have been effective. Although his completion percentage and efficiency rating are phenomenal, it is not due to his ability to make great throws. It is a combination of rarely being under pressure from defenses, being given simple reads (floods, rollouts, short crosses, etc.) and making smart decisions. That being said, Luck is a guy that will beat you if you give him the chance.
Like any offense or defense, it boils down to the people you have to execute it. The QB or RB making the right read or move. The WR making the right read or move. etc.

With that said, the niners under Raye were so bland that it was like soneone said pssst hey buddy we going to run a trap, or off tackle. Harbaugh will disguise the play and give his players to see what the other side is hiding and where the hole is in the def and off.
yes, on offense they will get in a huddle and at some point call a play. Then they will line up and run the play and try and score a touchdown. On Defense they will try to stop the offense. That is pretty damn predictable if you ask me.
yeah... predictably awesome
Originally posted by 49erFaithful6:
yeah... predictably awesome

Originally posted by Ronnie49Lott:
http://www.rakesofmallow.com/2010/9/23/1706624/stanford-at-notre-dame-cardinal-scouting-report

The Stanford Cardinal offense is an interesting case. On the one hand, they look dominant and controlling in the box score. No team has slowed them down, and they have made few mistakes. On the other hand, the game tape reveals a basic offense centered around a modified West Coast passing attack. This is not the ground and pound rushing attack that Notre Dame saw a year ago. Instead, Stanford runs out an incredible variety of formations that are designed to confuse defenses and give QB Andrew Luck the easiest reads possible.

This is not a run-first team. Stanford uses the pass to set up the run. Then, when the game is under control, they pound the ball at opposing defenses. In their first game, against Sacramento State, Luck was 14/18 passing in the first half and then 3/5 in the second half (the backup QB was 0/1). In their second game, against UCLA, Luck was 9/18 in the first half and then 2/6 in the second half. In their third game, against Wake Forest, Luck was 15/19 in the first half and then 2/4 in the second half (backup QBs were 3/5). So, while the final run/pass ratios suggest that Stanford is a run-first team, a deeper look at the stats show that dominant first halves this season have allowed them to control the clock with the run in the second halves.

Andrew Luck is not a great thrower. Overall, he is a very good QB but not great at throwing the football. The guy never makes mistakes. His throws, while sometimes bad, are always in a place that only his WR can catch them. He rarely throws into tight coverage. Luck is quick. He isn't afraid to tuck and run if the pass isn't there. He has a few 10+ yard scrambles this season. Stanford will run the option with him, but not often. It appears that he has some leeway at the line to make audibles or at least adjustments; they have been effective. Although his completion percentage and efficiency rating are phenomenal, it is not due to his ability to make great throws. It is a combination of rarely being under pressure from defenses, being given simple reads (floods, rollouts, short crosses, etc.) and making smart decisions. That being said, Luck is a guy that will beat you if you give him the chance.

Quote:
His throws, while sometimes bad, are always in a place that only his WR can catch them.

That doesn't make sense. How can a throw be bad "sometimes" yet "always" be in a place where only his guy can catch it?