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Singletary's reshaping of Niners

Great article on Singletary and how he is reshaping the Niners.
It is for ESPN Insiders or you can go out and by the mag. its a really good article

http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/insider/news/story?id=4494931
[ Edited by valrod33 on Sep 24, 2009 at 8:12 AM ]
Originally posted by valrod33:
Great article on Singletary and how he is reshaping the Niners.
It is for ESPN Insiders or you can go out and by the mag, or if you are really nice to me i can give you my password so you can read it but its a really good article.


http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/insider/news/story?id=4494931

I'll take that password if you would Thanks
Originally posted by tohara3:
Originally posted by valrod33:
Great article on Singletary and how he is reshaping the Niners.
It is for ESPN Insiders or you can go out and by the mag, or if you are really nice to me i can give you my password so you can read it but its a really good article.


http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/insider/news/story?id=4494931

I'll take that password if you would Thanks

ditto
password sent
  • Hctr
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 523
Originally posted by Lobo49er:
Originally posted by tohara3:
Originally posted by valrod33:
Great article on Singletary and how he is reshaping the Niners.
It is for ESPN Insiders or you can go out and by the mag, or if you are really nice to me i can give you my password so you can read it but its a really good article.


http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/insider/news/story?id=4494931

I'll take that password if you would Thanks

ditto

Me three
password plz!!
Can you summarize or paraphrase?
please hook me up with the pw valrod

thanks
Valrod, it's really cool of you to give the password, but ESPN locks accounts that have too many IP's logged in. Then they won't let you use your Insider anymore.

I wouldn't take the chance. Happened to my cousin. I mean 5 or 6 people they could give less of a s**t, but if it's 10-20 they do notice that.
[ Edited by Method on Sep 24, 2009 at 8:03 AM ]
  • Hctr
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 523
Originally posted by Hctr:
Originally posted by Lobo49er:
Originally posted by tohara3:
Originally posted by valrod33:
Great article on Singletary and how he is reshaping the Niners.
It is for ESPN Insiders or you can go out and by the mag, or if you are really nice to me i can give you my password so you can read it but its a really good article.


http://insider.espn.go.com/nfl/insider/news/story?id=4494931

I'll take that password if you would Thanks

ditto

Me three

Thank You , it's a very good read .
Originally posted by Method:
Valrod, it's really cool of you to give the password, but ESPN locks accounts that have too many IP's logged in. Then they won't let you use your Insider anymore.

I wouldn't take the chance. Happened to my cousin. I mean 5 or 6 people they could give less of a s**t, but if it's 10-20 they do notice that.

didnt know that, thats sucks thanks for the heads up.


No more password guys
Can someone give a brief synopsis of the article if you get a chance?
  • gore4prez
  • Info N/A
Talkin to some Vikes fan yesterday....said they were going to blow us out. I said " don't cont on it. "
K this part everybody can read, this is available to everybody not jsut insiders
Mike Singletary stands alone in the middle of two fields of action, a still life amid the chaos. A wooden cross rests on his chest, sunglasses hide his eyes and he holds his notebook in his hands, always. These are his tools, the instruments of his new profession.

The notebook is a Moleskine, with a black leather cover and rounded corners and a collection of crisp, white, acid-free pages inside. It has the same texture as a football, which gives him something to do with his hands. Vincent van Gogh used a similar notebook; so did Hemingway and Picasso. It's an artist's notebook, not for someone who scribbles. A man who uses a Moleskine tucks in his shirts.

Nearly every day of training camp, held under a blue California sky, Singletary has worn the same outfit: white cap, white windbreaker, red shorts, white socks, black shoes -- all of it looking fresh out of the box. The wooden cross, hanging from a simple black cord, is put on last, so it's the first thing you see when you look at him. He wears his clothes like a uniform, his cross like a medal. He looks precise. Knife-sharp. Ready to work.

There's something disarmingly serene about him, this 50-year-old man with the notebook. Here's a football coach who has commanded his San Francisco 49ers to throw their shoulders as hard as they ever have -- and yet he stands among them nearly still. Watching him now, with his arms folded, his pen in his mouth, he looks like an architect or poet, a man dreaming in the sun.

"I love this notebook," Singletary says later. "I keep a library of them. I write down things that strike me. I'll see a player do something I want him to do, I might write down, Today, he got it. It's like raising kids: You never know when you're going to get a special moment. It's easy to forget them. I want to keep track of the moments that make us who we are."



it goes on to talk about how at first he never wanted to coach but Mike Ditka thought he should. "Then Mike Ditka chomped in his ear: "Michael, why don't you think about becoming a coach?" Singletary said, "Oh, no, I'm not going to do that." But the idea stuck. That's when the transition began, his pilgrim's progress: That was the moment Mike Singletary began to reconcile his faith with his calling."


It also talks about how intense he was as a player and how he struggles to keep that under wraps now as a coach "When he began his coaching career six years ago, in charge of linebackers for the Ravens, he showed up for his first day of work carrying his old pads and helmet. Football, for him, was still about hitting and being hit."


It also talks about how his intense approach still strikes fear into his players, but that they respect him for it "It's not comfortable, for sure," says quarterback Alex Smith. "He won't tell you what you like to hear, but I respect him for it. We all do." Placekicker Joe Nedney is more succinct: "You don't want to fail in front of Coach Singletary."

also talks about how he doesnt want to be the center of attention for this team, the attention should be about the players because if its on it him somethings not working "The only skeptic left is Mike Singletary. He knows that this year can't be like his first. He knows that he can't remain at the center of things. "I don't really know how that got going," he says of the billboards, "but it can't be about me anymore. The spotlight has to shine on our players. The longer it's on me, the worse we're doing."


this is how the article ends. Its a pretty long story


Today, at Niners practice, he breaks his silence for the first time in what seems like hours, putting his notebook in his Windbreaker and crossing the sidelines onto the field. Team drills are unfolding, defense vs. offense, red shirts vs. white. Two huddles form, but the defense is tired, these giant men with their taped ankles, and their huddle is ragged. There's too much space between their shoulders, and they break with a half-hearted clap. "Whoa, whoa, whoa," Singletary says. "Go back and do that again."

He doesn't shout it. He says it. Words, not shoulders. ("He doesn't want his message to get lost in the tone," Atogwe says.) The giant men return obediently to their huddle. They form a more perfect circle, and when they break, it sounds like thunder clapping, bones snapping. They stand a half-inch taller, dig their cleats into the turf a little deeper. Singletary nods. Horns sound. Helmets crack.

"It's simple math," Singletary says. "I don't want to be a nag. Even in my parenting, I wish I could learn to let things go. But if I say this is the way we're going to do it, then we need to make sure we're doing it every day. If we do this and this, then we'll get that. That's how I see life, the game, everything else. Do these few things the right way each day, and the rest becomes inevitable."

So Singletary fixes the huddle and walks off the field and stands alone. He pulls out his notebook -- his Moleskine notebook, the one with a black leather cover and rounded corners and a collection of crisp, white, acid-free pages inside -- and takes his pen out of his mouth. Today they got it. Ten or 20 years from now, when he's someone else again, he'll read that line and remember that today was a beautiful day in San Francisco, and that he spent it watching the men he used to be.
  • Adman
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Who is the division rival who is dating his daughter?