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Due diligence on draftees?

Just out of curiousity, did the 9ers contact first rd picks 5-15 before draft day to see if any of them were drafted by us that they would indeed sign? Remember the Texans and Mario Williams instead of Reggie Bush, because the Texans knew Bush would not sign. Did we do any pre draft contacting like that, or did we just trust everything to luck?

To not do the above is not neglicence, it is stupidity, and results in the 9ers having the only unsigned first rounder in the nfl. That is an award we do not wish to have. Is anyone in our front office---scot, jed---still alive and able to actually manage a team , or are they on auto pilot, hoping that things just work out?
apples and oranges, IMO.
Originally posted by pasodoc9er:
Just out of curiousity, did the 9ers contact first rd picks 5-15 before draft day to see if any of them were drafted by us that they would indeed sign? Remember the Texans and Mario Williams instead of Reggie Bush, because the Texans knew Bush would not sign. Did we do any pre draft contacting like that, or did we just trust everything to luck?

To not do the above is not neglicence, it is stupidity, and results in the 9ers having the only unsigned first rounder in the nfl. That is an award we do not wish to have. Is anyone in our front office---scot, jed---still alive and able to actually manage a team , or are they on auto pilot, hoping that things just work out?

Nobody thought Crabtree was gonna drop to 10, so why would they have contacted him to see if he would sign. This is jsut an unfortunate situation, this is The 9ers fault for not contacting Crabtree to see if he would sign if we drafted him
Crabtree isn't signed b/c of money not b/c it's San Fran. gotta go with this is apples and oranges argument.
Further, any player would tell a team that of course they would sign, if they didn't, then no one would draft them.
Originally posted by HessianDud:
apples and oranges, IMO.

What he said.

Its not that he doesnt want to be with the 49ers, its that he wants more money than a 10th pick should recieve.

Reggie Bush just flat out didnt want to be a texan.
  • nj49erfan
  • Info N/A
With all do respect to a vet on this board this may be one of the worst posts I have ever read. Just so we are clear here you are mad because:

1. (Forget the fact that this is illegal by NFL rules for a moment) The 49ers were unable to contact all 15 or so people who may have still been available at the number 10 spot in which they would have picked if they were still there and ask the player if they would be willing to sign if we drafted them?
2. You would want us to pass up on a talent like Crabtree or someone of the caliber because they said they wouldn't sign with us?

Seriously? Really?

First, the Texans had the first pick and are allowed to negotiate with any player they want. Until the team with the first pick selects someone the next team drafting is not allowed to discuss any contract details with any draftee. This year was the first year the NFL allowed the team with the second pick to negotiate a contract with a darftee if the team with the first pick overall has already come to terms with the number one pick.

Second, the Texans did not ask who would sign. They asked how much guaranteed money it would take to sign each player. But again this is a luxuary only granted to the first team as if everyone could do it you could imagine a team like the redskins would tell Matt Stafford or Sanchez to hold out because they would offer a lot more money. Thus ruining the draft system all together.

Third, what draftee is going to tell any organization before the draft they will not sign?

Lastly, even if you could do this you take the best talent and assume they will realize 16 million guaranteed is better then no million guaranteed. To pass up on talent because you think they may not sign is stupid and negligent.

Now please proceed with calling me a newb lol.

[ Edited by nj49erfan on Sep 8, 2009 at 13:19:27 ]
great point, and evidently they did not do a great job with due diligence.

I would say a player falling is to be expected, it pretty much happens almost every year, so yes you have to do due dilligence even on unlikely players falling to you.

Some where along the line somebody should have asked themselves:
If Stafford dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Jason Smith dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Tyson Jackson dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Michael Crabtree dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?

Being prepared with that kind of knowledge is exactly what due diligence means.
Only the team with the first pick can negotiate with any of the players available. I believe the second teams after the first teams picked this year and last wanted to then negotiate but the commish told them no-reason they wanted to save some drama for the draft show. If say three to five teams made a done deal then the suspense for the draft day would lose viewers-it is all about the kala-money. Plus no team is allowed to talk with anyone until it is there turn.

Dallas did this with a second round pick once they made an offer when it was their turn and said take it or we will draft someone else who is willing to take the deal.
Originally posted by danimal:
great point, and evidently they did not do a great job with due diligence.

I would say a player falling is to be expected, it pretty much happens almost every year, so yes you have to do due dilligence even on unlikely players falling to you.

Some where along the line somebody should have asked themselves:
If Stafford dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Jason Smith dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Tyson Jackson dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Michael Crabtree dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?

Being prepared with that kind of knowledge is exactly what due diligence means.

No one has ever been this stupid before so you can not blame the niners for picking him. Most contract holdouts are because the team is trying to underpay the slated slot. Thats why the cinci always has issues with their draft picks. They want to underpay. Smith signed a lower deal with them just this year because he didn't want to stay away any longer. Now it is time for crabtree to make the same choice...football or money.
Originally posted by danimal:
great point, and evidently they did not do a great job with due diligence.

I would say a player falling is to be expected, it pretty much happens almost every year, so yes you have to do due dilligence even on unlikely players falling to you.

Some where along the line somebody should have asked themselves:
If Stafford dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Jason Smith dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Tyson Jackson dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Michael Crabtree dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?

Being prepared with that kind of knowledge is exactly what due diligence means.

except that the guy who gets drafted at #10 has a pretty set amount that he's going to get, so in essence they WERE prepared with that kind of knowledge. It's referred to as the "slotting system."

Don't know why fans of this team are still blaming the front office for Crabtree's demands.
Originally posted by nj49erfan:
With all do respect to a vet on this board this may be one of the worst posts I have ever read. Just so we are clear here you are mad because:

1. (Forget the fact that this is illegal by NFL rules for a moment) The 49ers were unable to contact all 15 or so people who may have still been available at the number 10 spot in which they would have picked if they were still there and ask the player if they would be willing to sign if we drafted them?
2. You would want us to pass up on a talent like Crabtree or someone of the caliber because they said they wouldn't sign with us?

Seriously? Really?

First, the Texans had the first pick and are allowed to negotiate with any player they want. Until the team with the first pick selects someone the next team drafting is not allowed to discuss any contract details with any draftee. This year was the first year the NFL allowed the team with the second pick to negotiate a contract with a darftee if the team with the first pick overall has already come to terms with the number one pick.

Second, the Texans did not ask who would sign. They asked how much guaranteed money it would take to sign each player. But again this is a luxuary only granted to the first team as if everyone could do it you could imagine a team like the redskins would tell Matt Stafford or Sanchez to hold out because they would offer a lot more money. Thus ruining the draft system all together.

Third, what draftee is going to tell any organization before the draft they will not sign?

Lastly, even if you could do this you take the best talent and assume they will realize 16 million guaranteed is better then no million guaranteed. To pass up on talent because you think they may not sign is stupid and negligent.

Now please procees with calling me a newb lol.

Your post beat me to the punch.

Also, the Texans chose Williams because they wanted Williams and not Bush. Reggie Bush would have signed with the Texans, because that's what NFL rookies do.

Outside of Bo Jackson and USFL players, you won't find modern day rookies holding out for an entire season. It's generally assumed that if you're drafted, you'll sign and play.

Now that I think about it, the California Redwoods could use a star Wide Receiver. Then again, Crabtree wants roughly half of the start up costs of the entire league.
Crabtree made a pre-draft visit to Niner HQ on 4/6. If they had no intention of accepting #10 money, Parker should NOT have scheduled a pre-draft visit with the team holding the #10 pick.

And I doubt Parker would have told the Niners: "Don't bother picking Michael at #10 if you expect him to sign for #10 money.", otherwise he'd be begging to slip past #10 and beyond.
Originally posted by danimal:
great point, and evidently they did not do a great job with due diligence.

I would say a player falling is to be expected, it pretty much happens almost every year, so yes you have to do due dilligence even on unlikely players falling to you.

Some where along the line somebody should have asked themselves:
If Stafford dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Jason Smith dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Tyson Jackson dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?
If Michael Crabtree dropped to us at 10, how much would he want?

Being prepared with that kind of knowledge is exactly what due diligence means.

They all get paid roughly the same with a variance of a few million either way. It's called the 'slotting system' for a reason.
As I said the raiders screwed us by offering the kind of money they did to their pick. It would have been a little easier maybe if it wasn't so outrageous.