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Cornellius Carradine

This stud would be a great addition to the D-line. Carradine flashes explosion off the snap to challenge the lateral agility of right tackles, and can swipe them away with strong hands to slingshot into the pocket. He also plays with the leverage of a shorter player, brings a strong initial punch to bull lesser tackles off the ball, and simply shoves tight ends away like ragdolls in the run game. There's certainly no issue with his motor, as he will hustle to the sideline if the play can be made.
Yes. He's my first choice for our round 1 pick. Tank at #31, Jamar Taylor or Banks at #34.

This all assumes that Trufant and Eifert don't fall.
He has a stupid name.

DO NOT WANT
i'm glad someone agrees. Carradine appeared to be headed for a first-round selection, but a torn ACL will limit his work prior to April's draft. The talent is certainly there, however. I would take a chance with maybe #34. it's all about value so maybe grouping some picks together to move up and fill a bigger need FS/SS. i don't see the 49ers with whitner long-term. Also the 49ers seem to have no problem trading down depending on how the draft plays out.
  • kent
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 36
Think this would be a great pick, though this FO does not seem to take injury risks with early picks.
Originally posted by kent:
Think this would be a great pick, though this FO does not seem to take injury risks with early picks.

definitely agree with you on that one. the 49ers did take a chance on frank gore 65th overall in the third round though- early pick either way.
Don't think he fits our 3-4 stuff I've read about him say he's a 4-3 DE .. I'm hoping we get Jones 31 banks 34 N Brandon Jenkins OLB/push rusher 61...
I like Tank, but I don't know if he'd fit our scheme. I know at the combine he weighed in at 276, which is only a pound less than Justin's weigh in, but that video and everything I've seen says his playing weight in college was 265.

Are you envisioning him playing at that 265 to rush the passer as an OLB, nickel DE? Or add another 10-15 lbs on top of the 276 to play the 5-tech?

Good player, like his long arms and skill set, but I think he's best as a 4-3 DE. I don't know if he has the frame to add the weight necessary to command multiple blocks and have the strength to be a force against the run game.

Also I think 31 and 34 are both a bit high for a situational pass rusher behind Aldon and Brooks, I know Aldon did that his first year but the intent was for him to be a starter sooner than later. With the contract Brooks got, and Aldon being Aldon, if Carradine was an OLB he'd have to wait awhile to see the field as a starter.
Originally posted by BermudaTriangle49er:
Originally posted by kent:
Think this would be a great pick, though this FO does not seem to take injury risks with early picks.

definitely agree with you on that one. the 49ers did take a chance on frank gore 65th overall in the third round though- early pick either way.

Alot different coaches N GM when we drafted gore ....
Originally posted by 2Legit2Quit:
I like Tank, but I don't know if he'd fit our scheme. I know at the combine he weighed in at 276, which is only a pound less than Justin's weigh in, but that video and everything I've seen says his playing weight in college was 265.

Are you envisioning him playing at that 265 to rush the passer as an OLB, nickel DE? Or add another 10-15 lbs on top of the 276 to play the 5-tech?

Good player, like his long arms and skill set, but I think he's best as a 4-3 DE. I don't know if he has the frame to add the weight necessary to command multiple blocks and have the strength to be a force against the run game.

Also I think 31 and 34 are both a bit high for a situational pass rusher behind Aldon and Brooks, I know Aldon did that his first year but the intent was for him to be a starter sooner than later. With the contract Brooks got, and Aldon being Aldon, if Carradine was an OLB he'd have to wait awhile to see the field as a starter.

it's all about instincts and awareness when making a switch from 4-3 to 3-4.This guy definitely has it all- Many defensive ends in a 4-3 have never been asked to do anything but rush the passer. They've gotten by throughout high school and into college using a quick first step, long reach, and explosive burst to beat their opponent and pressure the pass. "Play the run through to the quarterback". Coaches that have a "special pass rusher" knowingly take full advantage of it every snap.

If a 4-3 defensive end is suddenly employed in a 3-4 scheme and asked to do things his body has never been asked to do before, his mind had better be able to counter quickly as well. So much of being a successful linebacker in the NFL is about putting yourself in position to make plays, not necessarily "running them down". If a player has an excellent feel and recognition for movement around him, then more than likely he'll be able to utilize dominant physical attributes to put him where his mind says to go. But a player who can't "read and react" to what his eyes are telling him might as well be playing blindfolded. Professional football is just too fast and unforgiving for even an instant of delay. 3-4 OLB's are the catalyst to success in the scheme, their ability to create plays versus run and pass from every vantage point (on or off the line of scrimmage) is key.

Look for 4-3 college defensive ends with not only the physical tools but also the inertinstincts to diagnose and keen awareness to respond, to quickly be snatched up in the NFL Draft by clubs utilizing a 3-4 defense.
Originally posted by BermudaTriangle49er:
it's all about instincts and awareness when making a switch from 4-3 to 3-4.This guy definitely has it all- Many defensive ends in a 4-3 have never been asked to do anything but rush the passer. They've gotten by throughout high school and into college using a quick first step, long reach, and explosive burst to beat their opponent and pressure the pass. "Play the run through to the quarterback". Coaches that have a "special pass rusher" knowingly take full advantage of it every snap.

If a 4-3 defensive end is suddenly employed in a 3-4 scheme and asked to do things his body has never been asked to do before, his mind had better be able to counter quickly as well. So much of being a successful linebacker in the NFL is about putting yourself in position to make plays, not necessarily "running them down". If a player has an excellent feel and recognition for movement around him, then more than likely he'll be able to utilize dominant physical attributes to put him where his mind says to go. But a player who can't "read and react" to what his eyes are telling him might as well be playing blindfolded. Professional football is just too fast and unforgiving for even an instant of delay. 3-4 OLB's are the catalyst to success in the scheme, their ability to create plays versus run and pass from every vantage point (on or off the line of scrimmage) is key.

Look for 4-3 college defensive ends with not only the physical tools but also the inertinstincts to diagnose and keen awareness to respond, to quickly be snatched up in the NFL Draft by clubs utilizing a 3-4 defense.

This guy is Justin Smiths weight when he entered the draft but that doesn't mean he can't provide OLB rotation. Brooks/Smith essentially become DE when we switch to the 4-2 so this guy could provide rotation for them on passing downs. Its a situational but it still takes pressure off of Brooks and Smith. The 4-2 is very taxing on the them because they play closer inside and the olinemen can throw their weight at them. Also they don't get the edge rushing momentum. Carradine is a perfect 4-3 end but he has room to put on some weight. He has the strength and explosiveness to be a great 3-4 end and while hes getting stronger and learning the position he would still be effective in the nickle.
Originally posted by BermudaTriangle49er:
Originally posted by 2Legit2Quit:
I like Tank, but I don't know if he'd fit our scheme. I know at the combine he weighed in at 276, which is only a pound less than Justin's weigh in, but that video and everything I've seen says his playing weight in college was 265.

Are you envisioning him playing at that 265 to rush the passer as an OLB, nickel DE? Or add another 10-15 lbs on top of the 276 to play the 5-tech?

Good player, like his long arms and skill set, but I think he's best as a 4-3 DE. I don't know if he has the frame to add the weight necessary to command multiple blocks and have the strength to be a force against the run game.

Also I think 31 and 34 are both a bit high for a situational pass rusher behind Aldon and Brooks, I know Aldon did that his first year but the intent was for him to be a starter sooner than later. With the contract Brooks got, and Aldon being Aldon, if Carradine was an OLB he'd have to wait awhile to see the field as a starter.

it's all about instincts and awareness when making a switch from 4-3 to 3-4.This guy definitely has it all- Many defensive ends in a 4-3 have never been asked to do anything but rush the passer. They've gotten by throughout high school and into college using a quick first step, long reach, and explosive burst to beat their opponent and pressure the pass. "Play the run through to the quarterback". Coaches that have a "special pass rusher" knowingly take full advantage of it every snap.

If a 4-3 defensive end is suddenly employed in a 3-4 scheme and asked to do things his body has never been asked to do before, his mind had better be able to counter quickly as well. So much of being a successful linebacker in the NFL is about putting yourself in position to make plays, not necessarily "running them down". If a player has an excellent feel and recognition for movement around him, then more than likely he'll be able to utilize dominant physical attributes to put him where his mind says to go. But a player who can't "read and react" to what his eyes are telling him might as well be playing blindfolded. Professional football is just too fast and unforgiving for even an instant of delay. 3-4 OLB's are the catalyst to success in the scheme, their ability to create plays versus run and pass from every vantage point (on or off the line of scrimmage) is key.

Look for 4-3 college defensive ends with not only the physical tools but also the inertinstincts to diagnose and keen awareness to respond, to quickly be snatched up in the NFL Draft by clubs utilizing a 3-4 defense.

So... DE or OLB?

Because I think no matter how good this guy's instincts are he's not going to be playing the 5-tech at 265-275 lbs. I was just wondering if you think he has the abilitiy to pack on weight and still be effective in our system as a defensive lineman? Or is he best suited to OLB?... in which case unless he falls into at least the late 2nd round I don't think he'd be a good fit.
I don't know why people bring Smith up in relations to another college player Smith has tons of NFL experience N is a different player now then he was when he came into tha NFL
Originally posted by tatdwolf49:
I don't know why people bring Smith up in relations to another college player Smith has tons of NFL experience N is a different player now then he was when he came into tha NFL
Because people try to label a player incapable of playing a certain position because they didn't play it in college. Smith is a good example of someone who was light out college(277) but developed into an excellent 3-4 DE. The point is you can't restrict a player to a certain position based on weight or physical characteristics. Coachs pride themselves in being able to groom a raw player into a product. So saying "he will never play that position" or "he cant do that" is so counter productive. People should be thinking "how can this work" because the innovators are the ones that are truly rewarded IE Tomsulas conversion of Justin Smith to a 3-4 DE.
Originally posted by 2Legit2Quit:
So... DE or OLB?

Because I think no matter how good this guy's instincts are he's not going to be playing the 5-tech at 265-275 lbs. I was just wondering if you think he has the abilitiy to pack on weight and still be effective in our system as a defensive lineman? Or is he best suited to OLB?... in which case unless he falls into at least the late 2nd round I don't think he'd be a good fit.
Carradine has a developing frame with good muscle development, but still needs to increase his strength to combat the larger defenders at the pro level. He shows good quickness off the ball, along with above-average hand usage and lateral agility to slip blocks. He has very good agility and balance to play on his feet. carradine uses his hands well to protect himself from cuts blocks, but needs to separate and shed quicker when locked on. He can bend his knees and play with leverage, but is not real stout to anchor at the point of attack or to take on pulling offensive guards on traps. He has very good instincts and awareness, as he is quick to squeeze vs. down blocks. He has above average anchoring ability, but can still be driven back when run against. he is more of a factor on plays away in which he's quick to redirect and chase from the backside. He also pursues downfield with good effort and speed. He has quickness coming across the blocker's face and enough strength to collapse the lane vs. inside runs.- shows a good burst to the ball when working inside and the speed to chase down ball carriers. He runs well in the open, giving good effort to chase and pursue. He also takes good angles to the ball and has a good take-off on his pass rush. On running plays, he needs to square his base better, as he will turn his shoulders and get sealed off some at the point of attack. Still, he comes off the line with good pad level and body lean. He can burst around the corner with speed, loop through the gaps with quickness or bull rush straight up with power. He also shows a very good upfield burst and hand technique (good pop & jerk, rip, swim back inside) with the hip flip to get an edge. He can dip and bend the corner and has explosive acceleration to the quarterback when he comes free. Can also perform in a two-point stance as well as drop in coverage in some zone blitz situations. He's a solid tackler, aggressive to get to the ball and will bring his hips and unload on ball carriers. His biggest question is his ability to hold up at the point due to a frame that looks lean in the lower body. Still, he never gives up in pursuit, makes every effort to close rush lanes and has the sudden burst to make opposite field tackles. He has good burst to close and the body control to capture ball carriers in space. He makes some very big hits on the move and while he might not have the lower body strength to hold his ground vs. the larger blockers, he is superb in working on stunts and getting through the gaps. His speed allows him to reduce the pocket and he has shown the acceleration needed to come off the edge and get to the quarterback. He has good burst in his pass rush and can generate consistent pressure on the pocket. He has the burst and acceleration needed to work in space and changes direction as if he was a 225-pounder. The main thing he portrays on film is his aggressiveness and ability to play at a high intensity level. In a scheme that will allow him to stunt and play uncontested off the edge, some team could find a difference maker here.