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Trading up for Okung

If the Niners wanted to trade up to #2 or #3 in order to take Okung before the 'Skins have a chance, here is what a trade would look like:

Niners send: #13, #17, 4th rounder
Niners receive: #2 or #3, #33 or #34

If we were able to pull off a similar trade with the Chiefs, there would be no 4th rounder involved and we would still get their #36.

I think trading up for Okung is the best move the 49ers can make this year: getting a franchise-grade tackle AND filling their biggest need. Okung would play RT until he beats out Staley for the left side -- Staley would then move to the right.

With a pick at 33 - 36, the niners can still get a top-flight prospect: Jahvid Best, Golden Tate, Maurkice Pouncey, Devin McCourty, Sergio Kindle, Jerry Hughes, Kareem Jackson, Patrick Robinson, etc.

And we'd still have the #49.

I'm starting to lean towards the idea of jumping up to grab Okung with 'whatever it takes'. Okung would be the single biggest way to improve our team, without question.
Originally posted by nickbradley:
If the Niners wanted to trade up to #2 or #3 in order to take Okung before the 'Skins have a chance, here is what a trade would look like:

Niners send: #13, #17, 4th rounder
Niners receive: #2 or #3, #33 or #34

If we were able to pull off a similar trade with the Chiefs, there would be no 4th rounder involved and we would still get their #36.

I think trading up for Okung is the best move the 49ers can make this year: getting a franchise-grade tackle AND filling their biggest need. Okung would play RT until he beats out Staley for the left side -- Staley would then move to the right.

With a pick at 33 - 36, the niners can still get a top-flight prospect: Jahvid Best, Golden Tate, Maurkice Pouncey, Devin McCourty, Sergio Kindle, Jerry Hughes, Kareem Jackson, Patrick Robinson, etc.

And we'd still have the #49.

I'm starting to lean towards the idea of jumping up to grab Okung with 'whatever it takes'. Okung would be the single biggest way to improve our team, without question.

Yes, but the price is way too high especially in this draft. Our two firsts could net us two potential starters. Okung's caliber is not that much different from Bulaga or Williams. Heck, he's not even supposed to be better than some of the other tackles taken in the previous years.

Nah, stay pat and grab who drops! We could potentially land two top 15 picks who in most draft years would be top 10 easy.

JMTC...but, I do see your point.
you seem pretty obsessed with trading up not gonna happen this front office isn't equipped to be making any moves.
Member Milestone: This is post number 800 for nickbradley.
Originally posted by ninertico:
Okung's caliber is not that much different from Bulaga or Williams. Heck, he's not even supposed to be better than some of the other tackles taken in the previous years.

You're crazy man; Williams failed miserably at LT in 2009, and Bulaga has short arms that could cause him trouble with edge rushers. Okung has no negatives, is very polished, and would be a top 5 OT in any draft.
  • oklasooners
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I totally agree. Do whatever in our power to get okung. id trade our first round picks and in return grab the number 2 spot and det 2nd rounder. okung would solidify or tackle position.
  • TX9R
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Originally posted by lamontb:
you seem pretty obsessed with trading up not gonna happen this front office isn't equipped to be making any moves.
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by ninertico:
Okung's caliber is not that much different from Bulaga or Williams. Heck, he's not even supposed to be better than some of the other tackles taken in the previous years.

You're crazy man; Williams failed miserably at LT in 2009, and Bulaga has short arms that could cause him trouble with edge rushers. Okung has no negatives, is very polished, and would be a top 5 OT in any draft.

"Looked much better on the right side in 2008 than he did on the left side in 2009 --- Struggles as a senior can be at least partially attributed to a relative unfamiliarity with the position, his not necessarily being 100% healthy as well as an inexperienced group of o-lineman around him"--Scott Wright

"Final word: Williams' draft stock fluctuated for a lot of 2009 after switching from right tackle to left tackle. Although the left is where Williams has said he wants to play, he's clearly better on the right side. Before his senior year, he started 25 games on the right side and was one of the best blockers in the country.

Starting 13 games at left tackle, Williams was spotty. At the beginning of the season, he was erratic, particularly in his pass blocking. Williams wasn't fundamentally sound and got beat too often by rushers who could beat him to the outside. But as the season progressed, Williams clearly became more comfortable on the left side."--MockDan

2. Trent Williams, Oklahoma, 6-5, 315, 1
A fluid athlete with a high-rev motor, Williams is especially impressive handling quick, finesse type defensive ends because he has the footwork and body balance to stay with them. He validated that with impressive agility and position drills at the combine. While Williams appears to have enough strength to stop bull rushers, he is not always successful because he struggles to maintain a leverage position when attacked head on. The lone returning starter on the front line in 2009, he moved from right to left tackle and displayed an ability to recognize and react to various blitzes. According to coaching staff stats, Williams registered 369 knockdowns and 36 blocks that resulted in touchdowns in his final two seasons. --NFLDraftScout.com

The bottom line is that he didn't do as well at LT because of injuries, acclimated to new teammates on OL, and simply trying to get back into playing the LT position that he played most of his life.

However, most of everything I read about him states that as the season progressed he got much better.

Even Charlie Casserly stated that there is a flux on his is the sole #1 at OTs depending on who you talk to. Some have Bulaga, some Okung, and some Williams.

The bottom line is he is not that far off from Okung as Okung is the better pass blocker, but Williams is the better run blocker.

So we agree to disagree.
That's my ideal draft too. We could potentially have 2 Pro-bowl caliber tackles with the offensive weapons we have now. Which would keep the ball the offense's hands and bettering the defense at the same time
Originally posted by ninertico:
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by ninertico:
Okung's caliber is not that much different from Bulaga or Williams. Heck, he's not even supposed to be better than some of the other tackles taken in the previous years.

You're crazy man; Williams failed miserably at LT in 2009, and Bulaga has short arms that could cause him trouble with edge rushers. Okung has no negatives, is very polished, and would be a top 5 OT in any draft.

"Looked much better on the right side in 2008 than he did on the left side in 2009 --- Struggles as a senior can be at least partially attributed to a relative unfamiliarity with the position, his not necessarily being 100% healthy as well as an inexperienced group of o-lineman around him"--Scott Wright

"Final word: Williams' draft stock fluctuated for a lot of 2009 after switching from right tackle to left tackle. Although the left is where Williams has said he wants to play, he's clearly better on the right side. Before his senior year, he started 25 games on the right side and was one of the best blockers in the country.

Starting 13 games at left tackle, Williams was spotty. At the beginning of the season, he was erratic, particularly in his pass blocking. Williams wasn't fundamentally sound and got beat too often by rushers who could beat him to the outside. But as the season progressed, Williams clearly became more comfortable on the left side."--MockDan

2. Trent Williams, Oklahoma, 6-5, 315, 1
A fluid athlete with a high-rev motor, Williams is especially impressive handling quick, finesse type defensive ends because he has the footwork and body balance to stay with them. He validated that with impressive agility and position drills at the combine. While Williams appears to have enough strength to stop bull rushers, he is not always successful because he struggles to maintain a leverage position when attacked head on. The lone returning starter on the front line in 2009, he moved from right to left tackle and displayed an ability to recognize and react to various blitzes. According to coaching staff stats, Williams registered 369 knockdowns and 36 blocks that resulted in touchdowns in his final two seasons. --NFLDraftScout.com

The bottom line is that he didn't do as well at LT because of injuries, acclimated to new teammates on OL, and simply trying to get back into playing the LT position that he played most of his life.

However, most of everything I read about him states that as the season progressed he got much better.

Even Charlie Casserly stated that there is a flux on his is the sole #1 at OTs depending on who you talk to. Some have Bulaga, some Okung, and some Williams.

The bottom line is he is not that far off from Okung as Okung is the better pass blocker, but Williams is the better run blocker.

So we agree to disagree.

WalterFootball.com says that he wouldn't even draft him in the first round.
  • oklasooners
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The 9ers biggest need is OT. We have to consider trading up just as the article said. I love love for them to trade up and nab okung. If they do that, it wil allow Staley to move over to the right side (where i prefer him to be). that would solidify the o-line. Help out the whole offense with one trade. Our defense was pretty good last year, they just need rest.
  • cyber9er
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This our chance to get another franchise caliber tackle and solidify the tackle spots hopefully for the next decade. Here are the reasons why I feel he would be a perfect fit:

1) fills a huge need for a team on the cusp of playoff contention
2) superior pass protection ability would allow for a more "liberal" passing attack
3) along with suh and mccoy is the closest thing to a can't miss prospect and has drawn comparisons to former top prospects jake long (dolphins) and joe thomas (browns)
4) would be with the team hopefully for a decade or more which would add great talent and continuity to the offensive line and make it a strength of the offense and the team.
5) would also help improve the rushing attack

People will argue that trading picks isn't the way to go but wouldn't you want one great player at a position of need instead of just waiting to see what you get via bpa?

Discuss
Sounds good as long as we don't trade next years pick to do it. We would need to get #2 or #3 to get him, so it might be in range but i don't see it happening

[ Edited by Ibleedgoldnred on Apr 6, 2010 at 17:49:10 ]
I honestly do not like the idea of trading up.... You will end up losing 2nd or both firsts and this is a deep draft at alot of positions... If you were going to trade up I would do it for a few spots to get Trent Williams or Bulaga... I dont think trading up to #2 or #5 would be nessary to get our RT... when Williams or Bulaga (in my opinion) would be just a good of an option...
No.

Okung will go top 4 which means we'd have to give up both of our first rounders to take him.

Fact is he's not that much better than the other 3 OTs. Same way you don't reach for a need you shouldn't trade up for a need unless that player is a can't miss and you don't have other holes you can address.

We need to stay put and take BPA at positions that will help the team. We should see a very good player available either at RT, FS, CB, OG or DE/OLB

Worst case scenario you trade down and improve your team in other areas. While RT is probably our biggest need normally RT isn't that difficult to find. You don't want to throw scrubs ou there but it's not a position you trade up for to draft either.

Okung is good but imo he's not an elite tackle - just happens to be the best this year.