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Coaches Film Analysis: 2019 Season

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  • fryet
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I have a question about the defensive line slanting to stop the run. It appears to me that when you can a line slant, you can either get lucky and it is against the offensive run play, or unlucky and you slant the same way that the offense is running. It is a 50/50 shot on whether you slant the desired way. Or does it still work if you slant in the same way the offense is running?

Final thought - in previous weeks you showed how we have these intricate run plays that punishes an aggressive/reacting defense. Would a slant also give us trouble on our own run plays? I sure hope Saleh didn't show the rest of the league how to break our own run offense!
Originally posted by thl408:
This is the Solly sack. 49ers continue to slant towards the weakside of the Rams OL.
Solly playing at 2i puts him a bit further away from the Center as opposed to if he was playing 1t. In addition to being at 2i, Solly will also be slanting weakside, further away from the Center.
Rams are going to pull the left guard (to sell playaction), so that Center has to get across and down block on Solly.


The Center's block is tough with Solly at 2i. In addition to that, Solly is slanting away from the Center so now the Center has more distance to cover.


Solly bursts through the block and shows a bit of bend to close the deal.


These are awesome. I grew up with the toy NFL game where the field vibrated and players went every which way so that's how I played.
These guys know where they're vibrating to!
Originally posted by fryet:
I have a question about the defensive line slanting to stop the run. It appears to me that when you can a line slant, you can either get lucky and it is against the offensive run play, or unlucky and you slant the same way that the offense is running. It is a 50/50 shot on whether you slant the desired way. Or does it still work if you slant in the same way the offense is running?

Final thought - in previous weeks you showed how we have these intricate run plays that punishes an aggressive/reacting defense. Would a slant also give us trouble on our own run plays? I sure hope Saleh didn't show the rest of the league how to break our own run offense!

Yes and no. It's a tool in the toolbox but not the only one. It can potentially come and bite you, that's why there are a number of adjustments throughout the game. The thing with slants is that the whole defense has to understand what's going on, even to the safeties. The safeties will have specific run fits, just like LB's, in this system it's a one-gap system. Meaning, each guy is responsible for one gap. 3-4 defenses are usually a 2-gap system where DT's are going to look to control whatever gap they are getting doubled out of, which could be either side. with a one-gap, the LB's and S's have to know exactly which gaps the guys will be going in to, not where they're lined up, and know who is going to fill which vacated gaps now. One example of this is the scrape-exchange. Where you'll bring a DE into a D, C or B gap while the 2nd level defender stacking them is now responsible for outside contain.

Would a slant give our running offense trouble? Sure. However, we are better equipped to deal with those as we have a FB, that allows us more flexibility in the run game and makes it hard for defenses to clue into and execute their slants. That's why we'll run our outside zone to the weakside a lot and then strong side and then counters to either side. Slanting against our run game is less than 50/50. It's more like 80/20 they're going to be wrong.
Originally posted by Sourball:
Originally posted by thl408:


That is one crazy azz pass pro scheme... it's Liz slide protect, with the backside guard assigned to the playside edge rusher! That is just stupid and the Lambs deserved a sack with that scheme Lol the pulling guard created the void for Solly to burst through
  • thl408
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Originally posted by fryet:
I have a question about the defensive line slanting to stop the run. It appears to me that when you can a line slant, you can either get lucky and it is against the offensive run play, or unlucky and you slant the same way that the offense is running. It is a 50/50 shot on whether you slant the desired way. Or does it still work if you slant in the same way the offense is running?

Final thought - in previous weeks you showed how we have these intricate run plays that punishes an aggressive/reacting defense. Would a slant also give us trouble on our own run plays? I sure hope Saleh didn't show the rest of the league how to break our own run offense!

If a DL slants the wrong way it can definitely work against them. In this particular situation/game vs the Rams, the 49ers were getting beat on the weakside of the OL so that's why they slanted towards the weakside of the OL. From a formation standpoint, wide 9 sets a hard edge. So a defense has to know that runs will not be going outside the tackles. Runs should not be able to get outside the strongside DE if he does his job and sets that hard edge. So then they know runs will be somewhere inside the tackles. Wide 9 (hard edge set), coupled with slanting weak clogged up the middle if the run wanted to go weakside.

On a 2Q Ram run, the 49ers slanted weak, the play was outside zone to the strongside. They got burned for 22 yards.
Originally posted by thl408:
Originally posted by fryet:
I have a question about the defensive line slanting to stop the run. It appears to me that when you can a line slant, you can either get lucky and it is against the offensive run play, or unlucky and you slant the same way that the offense is running. It is a 50/50 shot on whether you slant the desired way. Or does it still work if you slant in the same way the offense is running?

Final thought - in previous weeks you showed how we have these intricate run plays that punishes an aggressive/reacting defense. Would a slant also give us trouble on our own run plays? I sure hope Saleh didn't show the rest of the league how to break our own run offense!

If a DL slants the wrong way it can definitely work against them. In this particular situation/game vs the Rams, the 49ers were getting beat on the weakside of the OL so that's why they slanted towards the weakside of the OL. From a formation standpoint, wide 9 sets a hard edge. So a defense has to know that runs will not be going outside the tackles. Runs should not be able to get outside the strongside DE if he does his job and sets that hard edge. So then they know runs will be somewhere inside the tackles. Wide 9 (hard edge set), coupled with slanting weak clogged up the middle if the run wanted to go weakside.

On a 2Q Ram run, the 49ers slanted weak, the play was outside zone to the strongside. They got burned for 22 yards.

That, and Tartt started out in the box and then was dropping late into a cover-2. He was backpedaling at the snap and so he was slow in his run fit.
  • thl408
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Originally posted by jonnydel:
Yes and no. It's a tool in the toolbox but not the only one. It can potentially come and bite you, that's why there are a number of adjustments throughout the game. The thing with slants is that the whole defense has to understand what's going on, even to the safeties. The safeties will have specific run fits, just like LB's, in this system it's a one-gap system. Meaning, each guy is responsible for one gap. 3-4 defenses are usually a 2-gap system where DT's are going to look to control whatever gap they are getting doubled out of, which could be either side. with a one-gap, the LB's and S's have to know exactly which gaps the guys will be going in to, not where they're lined up, and know who is going to fill which vacated gaps now. One example of this is the scrape-exchange. Where you'll bring a DE into a D, C or B gap while the 2nd level defender stacking them is now responsible for outside contain.

Would a slant give our running offense trouble? Sure. However, we are better equipped to deal with those as we have a FB, that allows us more flexibility in the run game and makes it hard for defenses to clue into and execute their slants. That's why we'll run our outside zone to the weakside a lot and then strong side and then counters to either side. Slanting against our run game is less than 50/50. It's more like 80/20 they're going to be wrong.

on the bolded.
Originally posted by riverrunzthruit:
Originally posted by Sourball:
Originally posted by thl408:


That is one crazy azz pass pro scheme... it's Liz slide protect, with the backside guard assigned to the playside edge rusher! That is just stupid and the Lambs deserved a sack with that scheme Lol the pulling guard created the void for Solly to burst through

Looks like Cooper Kupp (#18) was supposed to chip Bosa then run his route. I suppose he "slowed" Bosa down?
  • thl408
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  • Posts: 25,072
This is the Rams longest run of the day. So the adjustment the 49ers made was to slant to the weakside.
Outside zone left (OL's left side is the strongside, also the playside)


All the red highlighted DLmen got sealed off to the playside because they slanted the wrong way. Rams make adjustments too.


When the TE motions over to swap sides, you see Warner make the adjustment. "Hey guys, we slanting to the other side now", because weakside has changed. Rams run it hard strongside.
+22 because Kwon missed a tackle, but there was daylight regardless.
placeholder
[ Edited by jonnydel on Oct 16, 2019 at 1:08 PM ]

Originally posted by thl408:


This is why I love the NFL, all the intricacies that can be practiced to perfection (I'm ignoring the fact that this is the Lambs for now, and just appreciating football)... this is OZ run blocking which is a joy to watch when done well and is designed to handle any front or stunt without any adjustments... basic OZ blocking rule is next man playside on your track and punch and pass off for a headup defender... the basic footwork is (1) bucket step then a (2) cross over step then a (3) reach step to get on your angled track... but here there is an adjustment on the EMLOS (end man line of scrimmage) with a fold block between the Tackle (77) and the the stand up TE (18) that is executed flawlessly... even the Z receiver (17) gets on an OZ track to attack the outside shoulder the man on his track, the H back (89) gets on his track for the SS...
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Originally posted by Buchy:
Originally posted by DRCHOWDER:
I hope I don't get banned for this, but in this video break down it looks as if Jimmy stares down his blanket and misses the really open receiver. I love the work you do in the video analysis jonny, but the way you say hes reading the defense when it really seems like he just shuts down the other side of the field because hes more comfortable just looking and staring down his security blanket (kittle) instead of playing the whole field. Had he hit that open receiver instead of kittle the chances of breaking a tackle against 1 safety (weddle) is better than 2 players.

https://gyazo.com/4a7d7f7eb21a31380cd1f111c1c1f3ca

I mean I just say this because pocket was clean and good, if he was really reading the defense he'll read the whole field just not his security blanket. We made the 3rd down completion regardless, but thats just another view of it. I bring this up also because of that complete stare down of that receiver that should've been a pick 6 by the defender in the game. Please don't ban me admins for having a different opinion.

p.s. I would like to give kudos to Jimmy G for getting them to go offsides mulitple times... something I brought up earlier in this thread.

I was rewatching as well and I thought Deebo was open too but looking at the pocket and pressure Jimmy was under he didn't have time to see if Deebo was going to come open - he's in the endzone making a pass, he's just got to get the ball out early and safely.

A couple things to consider there.
1. Deebo is going to be 3rd in the progression. QB's aren't coached to jump from 2nd to 3rd in the progression because the 3rd might be open even if the 2nd is open. He'll take a glance out on the streak to look for a quick win(like immediate win) then quickly move to #2, if that's open, especially on 3rd down, you throw it.
2. He's throwing from his own endzone. There's a lot of bad things that can happen there and only 1 of them good. We're not looking to put up points in that situation, it was right before the 2 minute warning backed up that far, so I think Kyle's thought is, "get a first down and don't let the Rams get the ball again with good field position" not "we can get a score here".
3. He's got 2 backup tackles in and his O-line going against A. Donald. He gets strip sacked it's either a safety or a TD, he gets sacked it's a safety and the Rams get the ball, one of his lineman gets called for holding it's a safety. That's a dangerous place to throw from so I have zero problem with him going to the first open side or even working his "safety blanket". We ended up moving the ball down into scoring range but Gould missed a 55 yarder.


Originally posted by thl408:
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Originally posted by Buchy:
Originally posted by DRCHOWDER:
I hope I don't get banned for this, but in this video break down it looks as if Jimmy stares down his blanket and misses the really open receiver. I love the work you do in the video analysis jonny, but the way you say hes reading the defense when it really seems like he just shuts down the other side of the field because hes more comfortable just looking and staring down his security blanket (kittle) instead of playing the whole field. Had he hit that open receiver instead of kittle the chances of breaking a tackle against 1 safety (weddle) is better than 2 players.

https://gyazo.com/4a7d7f7eb21a31380cd1f111c1c1f3ca

I mean I just say this because pocket was clean and good, if he was really reading the defense he'll read the whole field just not his security blanket. We made the 3rd down completion regardless, but thats just another view of it. I bring this up also because of that complete stare down of that receiver that should've been a pick 6 by the defender in the game. Please don't ban me admins for having a different opinion.

p.s. I would like to give kudos to Jimmy G for getting them to go offsides mulitple times... something I brought up earlier in this thread.

I was rewatching as well and I thought Deebo was open too but looking at the pocket and pressure Jimmy was under he didn't have time to see if Deebo was going to come open - he's in the endzone making a pass, he's just got to get the ball out early and safely.

A couple things to consider there.
1. Deebo is going to be 3rd in the progression. QB's aren't coached to jump from 2nd to 3rd in the progression because the 3rd might be open even if the 2nd is open. He'll take a glance out on the streak to look for a quick win(like immediate win) then quickly move to #2, if that's open, especially on 3rd down, you throw it.
2. He's throwing from his own endzone. There's a lot of bad things that can happen there and only 1 of them good. We're not looking to put up points in that situation, it was right before the 2 minute warning backed up that far, so I think Kyle's thought is, "get a first down and don't let the Rams get the ball again with good field position" not "we can get a score here".
3. He's got 2 backup tackles in and his O-line going against A. Donald. He gets strip sacked it's either a safety or a TD, he gets sacked it's a safety and the Rams get the ball, one of his lineman gets called for holding it's a safety. That's a dangerous place to throw from so I have zero problem with him going to the first open side or even working his "safety blanket". We ended up moving the ball down into scoring range but Gould missed a 55 yarder.

This could be a pick-a-side type of play. To Jimmy's right is the Fade-Out, like jd described in his video. That's good to attack the flat versus a curl/flat defender, or man coverage if the Out route can win outside leverage.
Orange + purple is the Sucker concept which is good versus a Hook defender. Jimmy's presnap read was man coverage, so that's why he looked to the Fade-Out. Sucker isn't as effective versus man.
But as jd stated in the vid, Rams are playing tricks here by giving a presnap read of man coverage, but actually is playing zone.


Versus Cover3, Sucker can work to vertically stretch a Hook defender (orange). Orange stays with Pettis' snag route, so that frees up Deebo.


But considering game situation and field position, I think getting the ball out quickly is a high priority. I don't think either choice, working the Fade-Out or the Sucker, is a wrong choice. Big credit to Kittle here for reading zone and sitting down instead of running a quick Out. Good chemistry on display here between Kittle and Jimmy.

Good points made by both of you guys... I just wanted to bring in a different opinion on the matter. Anywho keep up the good works fellas! appreciate both the work you two bring to the forums.
Thank you to jonnydel and thl for the after game work. You guys rock.
Originally posted by jonnydel:

Just awesome to watch
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