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New rule banning lowering of the helmet

Originally posted by Furlow:
The end of a 100m race is controlled deceleration, completely different than football where acceleration is paramount. It's literally impossible to accelerate without leaning forward. Tackle football is played in explosive 5-10 yard increments, expecting players to be upright is ridiculously silly, and only suit-wearing nerds who never played the game would think otherwise.

I agree with this 100%. This is the truth.
Originally posted by Joecool:
  • Look at Earl Campbell. None of the tackles against him required him to put his head down …



  • He only did on the first one to give punishment

That's because Earl understand the scripture verse, Acts 20:35: "It is more blessed to give than to receive"

Surely I jest ;D … and I don't take head trauma, and injuries lightly (as I've been concussed). I think the
main concern from Fans, and Players alike, is how the officials will rule on this, in game in the heat of
battle, on bang-bang-plays. Especially, on the defensive side of things.

I saw a college game last season, where a player was ejected for targeting. Upon looking at the replay,
I felt that the referee, made a bad call. That team although losing one of it's star defensive players, still
won the contest.

However, and unlike a college squad … NFL sidelines, aren't loaded with suited players -- of almost equal
playing ability and talent -- ready at the wait, to fill the void.

I'd suspect, we'll have a better idea by mid-season, how this all unfolds …
[ Edited by FlayvaMeister on Apr 5, 2018 at 12:14 AM ]
Originally posted by SanDiego49er:
Originally posted by Furlow:
The end of a 100m race is controlled deceleration, completely different than football where acceleration is paramount. It's literally impossible to accelerate without leaning forward. Tackle football is played in explosive 5-10 yard increments, expecting players to be upright is ridiculously silly, and only suit-wearing nerds who never played the game would think otherwise.

I agree with this 100%. This is the truth.

Your gonna have 3/4 of the game where they don't throw the flag.

Then, the last quarter to cover the spread or to help dictate a game, the flag will come out. By midseason there will be talk about "addressing" this rule in the off-season with announcers saying s**t like, "they have to do something about this" "what is "lowering helmet and what isn't" with taking heads like laConidiot and "side mouth talker" Schefter acting like they are giving out ground breaking news.

That catch rule sure helped dictate some games didn't it. Now they changed it.
Same old s**t
[ Edited by jeepzilla on Apr 5, 2018 at 8:03 AM ]
I would hope the refs use this rule as intended. I could see a defender stepping in front of a RB and having the RB's helmet hit him in the chest...15 yards!
It may be a rough couple of years but players will adjust. Defenders already have adjusted with staying away from hitting with the crown of their helmet. I have seen quite a few shoulder hits that would have easily been knockout helmet blows the past couple of years.

It will take time but they will adjust to more technical tackling rather than simply torpedoing into one another.

There is a big difference than slanting your body forward for acceleration and putting your head down to use as a battering ram. Battering ram is not needed by a ball carrier or a tackler. Only time I think it may be needed is for short yardage and blocking.

Nobody is expecting players to run as if they have a stick up their asses. Just don't use your head as a battering ram.
  • Goatie
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 13,606
Originally posted by Joecool:
Nobody is expecting players to run as if they have a stick up their asses. Just don't use your head as a battering ram.

Hopefully common sense will prevail.

The refs seem pretty sensible most of the time and I don't think they will be pinging running backs who run low and forward. They are looking for helmet missiles
Originally posted by Joecool:
  • It may be a rough couple of years but players will adjust …
  • Defenders already have adjusted with staying away from hitting with the crown of their helmet …
  • It will take time but they will adjust to more technical tackling rather than simply torpedoing into one another …

I agree with these points:
I'd imagine the NFL knows there will be some growing pains, and a learning curve.
I also foresee some frustration, on the part of: players, coaches, and the officials …

This ruling, was made for the future of the NFL … it's being put into play, for the
next generation of players … for the kids in high school, and those just entering
into university.

Four to five years for now, most of the players who might find it hard to adapt,
will be either out of the league, or close to being retired.
Originally posted by Goatie:
Originally posted by Joecool:
Nobody is expecting players to run as if they have a stick up their asses. Just don't use your head as a battering ram.

Hopefully common sense will prevail.

The refs seem pretty sensible most of the time and I don't think they will be pinging running backs who run low and forward. They are looking for helmet missiles

Yeah. Shazier injury caused the movement.
Originally posted by Furlow:
The end of a 100m race is controlled deceleration, completely different than football where acceleration is paramount. It's literally impossible to accelerate without leaning forward. Tackle football is played in explosive 5-10 yard increments, expecting players to be upright is ridiculously silly, and only suit-wearing nerds who never played the game would think otherwise.

You are right about the need to get low, however I'm a rugby player, and the fact is that you need to put your head into smart positions, it's something you have to learn to do, trust me you can use your shoulders without making contact with your head.

Football players have never had to learn this due to the protection of a helmet, and ability to use it as a weapon.

Unfortunately severe injuries and tests have proven that this has to change.

I hope the refs can see the difference between a bang bang play and a deliberate targeting, but the players have to adapt.
[ Edited by 49erBigMac on Apr 8, 2018 at 4:55 AM ]

Originally posted by FlayvaMeister:
Originally posted by Joecool:
  • It may be a rough couple of years but players will adjust …
  • Defenders already have adjusted with staying away from hitting with the crown of their helmet …
  • It will take time but they will adjust to more technical tackling rather than simply torpedoing into one another …

I agree with these points:
I'd imagine the NFL knows there will be some growing pains, and a learning curve.
I also foresee some frustration, on the part of: players, coaches, and the officials …

This ruling, was made for the future of the NFL … it's being put into play, for the
next generation of players … for the kids in high school, and those just entering
into university.

Four to five years for now, most of the players who might find it hard to adapt,
will be either out of the league, or close to being retired.

It is as much a mindset as physical. Patrick Willis was an absolute beautiful form tackler, but no one would call him soft. He did not torpedo with his head but used his shoulder or chest and drove his target into the ground. That's the way they use to teach tackling and I suspect most good coaches still do. It is more sure, fewer whiffs, and safer for the tackler. The DBs may have to adjust their headhunting MOs...which is habit and bad coaching in my opinion.

Wonder how many fans will be disappointed when they do not see any head spearing. A lot of people like to see football at it's most violent rather than the nuances of good play. Guess the ratings will show us.
[ Edited by dtg_9er on Apr 8, 2018 at 7:25 AM ]
  • Furlow
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 12,190
Originally posted by 49erBigMac:
Originally posted by Furlow:
The end of a 100m race is controlled deceleration, completely different than football where acceleration is paramount. It's literally impossible to accelerate without leaning forward. Tackle football is played in explosive 5-10 yard increments, expecting players to be upright is ridiculously silly, and only suit-wearing nerds who never played the game would think otherwise.

You are right about the need to get low, however I'm a rugby player, and the fact is that you need to put your head into smart positions, it's something you have to learn to do, trust me you can use your shoulders without making contact with your head.

Football players have never had to learn this due to the protection of a helmet, and ability to use it as a weapon.

Unfortunately severe injuries and tests have proven that this has to change.

I hope the refs can see the difference between a bang bang play and a deliberate targeting, but the players have to adapt.

Good post and I agree for the most part. I've played both sports and coached football. I've always taught my players to tackle "with their head out of the way, eyes up." But the speed and angles of the NFL make it impossible to avoid all helmet contact. There are going to be a ton of penalties for unavoidable contact. This really changes the game completely.
  • Furlow
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 12,190
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
Originally posted by FlayvaMeister:
Originally posted by Joecool:
  • It may be a rough couple of years but players will adjust …
  • Defenders already have adjusted with staying away from hitting with the crown of their helmet …
  • It will take time but they will adjust to more technical tackling rather than simply torpedoing into one another …

I agree with these points:
I'd imagine the NFL knows there will be some growing pains, and a learning curve.
I also foresee some frustration, on the part of: players, coaches, and the officials …

This ruling, was made for the future of the NFL … it's being put into play, for the
next generation of players … for the kids in high school, and those just entering
into university.

Four to five years for now, most of the players who might find it hard to adapt,
will be either out of the league, or close to being retired.

It is as much a mindset as physical. Patrick Willis was an absolute beautiful form tackler, but no one would call him soft. He did not torpedo with his head but used his shoulder or chest and drove his target into the ground. That's the way they use to teach tackling and I suspect most good coaches still do. It is more sure, fewer whiffs, and safer for the tackler. The DBs may have to adjust their headhunting MOs...which is habit and bad coaching in my opinion.

Wonder how many fans will be disappointed when they do not see any head spearing. A lot of people like to see football at it's most violent rather than the nuances of good play. Guess the ratings will show us.

This would be a penalty with this new rule.

[ Edited by Furlow on Apr 8, 2018 at 8:39 AM ]
Originally posted by Furlow:
This would be a penalty with this new rule.


No it wouldn't because he made contact with his shoulder, not his head.

I see where you're coming from, sometimes it is unavoidable (that's normally when rugby players get knocked the F* out!) the players and refs need to adjust to stop it getting out of hand.
Originally posted by Furlow:
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
Originally posted by FlayvaMeister:
Originally posted by Joecool:
  • It may be a rough couple of years but players will adjust …
  • Defenders already have adjusted with staying away from hitting with the crown of their helmet …
  • It will take time but they will adjust to more technical tackling rather than simply torpedoing into one another …

I agree with these points:
I'd imagine the NFL knows there will be some growing pains, and a learning curve.
I also foresee some frustration, on the part of: players, coaches, and the officials …

This ruling, was made for the future of the NFL … it's being put into play, for the
next generation of players … for the kids in high school, and those just entering
into university.

Four to five years for now, most of the players who might find it hard to adapt,
will be either out of the league, or close to being retired.

It is as much a mindset as physical. Patrick Willis was an absolute beautiful form tackler, but no one would call him soft. He did not torpedo with his head but used his shoulder or chest and drove his target into the ground. That's the way they use to teach tackling and I suspect most good coaches still do. It is more sure, fewer whiffs, and safer for the tackler. The DBs may have to adjust their headhunting MOs...which is habit and bad coaching in my opinion.

Wonder how many fans will be disappointed when they do not see any head spearing. A lot of people like to see football at it's most violent rather than the nuances of good play. Guess the ratings will show us.

This would be a penalty with this new rule.


Not sure there is a player who hasn't been penalized, but the point is...Willis generally had the most pure form of any LB I can recall. Guys have to return to that. One thing that is not being addressed in the media enough is the change in draft status of guys who made their reps by violent collisions. Will some defenders drop if they are not fundamentally sound? Hope so!
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