Nolan’s Usual: Get Defensive, Bash a Player

Oct 14, 2008 at 7:26 AM


Maybe Nolan's reputation for being a defensive specialist formed because he was emotionally defensive. This seems to be the problem whenever anyone questions his decisions.

Media: "Your defense is leaking like bed-wetting 12 year old. What seems to be the problem?"

Nolan: "Problem? I have no problem. The players just need to play better and listen to me more."

Media: "Alex Smith says you threw him under the bus. What gives?"

Nolan: "Why would you even suggest such a thing! he's a grown man, he should have come to me and not you."

And now he is continuing his long tradition of lashing out against players when pressed by the media.

It happened with Trent Dilfer and Alex Smith. Apparently Dilfer was the greatest quarterback Nolan had ever seen - well, until he saw JT O'Sullivan.

Finally we get to present day. In defending Mark Roman, a safety who hasn't had an interception since 2006, Nolan said, "Mark's a good football player. He helps us win and helps people around him, and makes the players around him better. They feel assured he'll do his job. . . . Not to take anything away from Dashon. Dashon's a good player. Will he help our stealing the ball? I don't know. In the 'Big Sub,' he was in every down. He has been playing, and I don't recall seeing him get turnovers at that time."

It's almost like he caught himself, realized that he was implying that Goldson couldn't make the players around him better and threw Goldson a little bone.

Then he remembered he was Nolan and called out Goldson for not getting any turnovers.

The simple fact is that the defense needs change. Who was making interceptions left and right during training camp? Dashon Goldson. Will he need more coaching to be successful? Yes, but that is Nolan's job. Roman doesn't even wear the defensive communication device on the field anymore, Patrick Willis does.

This is just another example of Nolan getting defensive when the media presses him and he doesn't have the answer. "We need to play better" is a complete cop-out. How does the team play better? By doing what they are still doing? Doing the same thing over and over while expecting a different result is the hallmark of insanity.

This is not to say that Nolan is insane, but he is certainly flawed in this respect. Should Goldson start? I would say yes, but there is an argument for him not starting. Throwing Goldson under the bus, however, is not the way a coach should handle things.
The opinions within this article are those of the writer and, while just as important, are not necessarily those of the site as a whole.


4 Comments

  • NINERMD
    COULDNT HAVE SAID BETTER MYSELF. 100% ACCURATE. THIS GUY NEEDS TO GO.
    Oct 15, 2008 at 6:17 PM
    0
  • niner
    nolan is insane. how can you bash the players you picked, drafted and coached? When is it his pitiful coaching that is the problem???(see ol) players coaches like ronnie lott and mike singletary make sense, they are probowlers with sb experience who are now HOF. Why in the world would you want a guy cut from GB to coache your team? Isnt it HIS job to coach? PS your D watn all that great last year. ( hardly in the top 10) We were os pitiful on offense last year, teams played 2-3 rd stringers after the first quarter. YOU bombed in Washington and in Balt you had lewis. Everyone who has Lewis looks good you idiot! ( that means you too York you dim wit, why dont you think none of the 31 other owners wanted him?)
    Oct 14, 2008 at 5:03 PM
    0
    Response: I agree that, like Lowell Cohn says in his blog, Nolan needs to own up and take some responsibility. The rest of your comment I'm not too sure on because I can't understand it.
  • Rebel
    In defending Mark Roman, a safety who hasn't had an interception since 2006, Nolan said, "Mark's a good football player. He helps us win and helps people around him, and makes the players around him better. They feel assured he'll do his job. . . . What a joke! He helps us win? Really? When? The team is 2-4 , most likely soon to be 2-6. They have beat two teams with a combined record of 1-9. The over-hyped, most experienced secondary in the NFL can't stop the opposing teams "off the street replacement hacks" or the Eagles rookie WR. Thank goodness for Mark Roman, without him this team would suck. Does Nolan even think before he speaks? I wonder if he believes the things that fly out of his own mouth?
    Oct 14, 2008 at 2:55 PM
    0
  • Archie
    I agree that Alex Smith is a grown man and should have gone to the coach and please let's remember Jimmy Johnson openly criticized Dan Marino!! Let's stop the pity-party for Alex Smith. Smith is a bust and sometimes players should be called out in a way. If you're going to suggest to the head coach that he's not starting the right player then you need to be prepared to accept whatever the coach says in defense of his decision. I think Mark Roman needs to be replaced and I think Mike Nolan needs to be replaced but I am not mad at Nolan for speaking truth about a player's performance. I just wish Nolan was a better coach.
    Oct 14, 2008 at 9:21 AM
    0
    Response: Part of a coaches job is to motivate his team. In fact, some would say that is the most critical job of the head coach. A good motivator does not take a one size fits all approach to each player. Some players can get called out and it lights s fire under them. Others need to be handled behind closed doors. It was obvious that Smith did not like the public criticism and Nolan's inability to dial into the pulse of his players only highlights another problem with his leadership. Sometimes it seems like Bill Belicheck knows more about the 49ers players than Nolan does. Would Nolan be able to rattle off all of the names and positions on the 49ers like Belicheck did? I'm not too sure.

Facebook Comments



More San Francisco 49ers News



49ers kicker Robbie Gould named NFC Special Teams Player of the Week

By David Bonilla
Jan 12

The NFL announced that San Francisco 49ers kicker Robbie Gould has been named the NFC Special Teams Player of the Week following the team's 27-24 road victory over the Los Angeles Rams. In Week 18, Gould converted both of his field goals—from 42 and 24 yards—and all three point after attempts for a total of nine points in the overtime win at SoFi Stadium. He also punted twice with an average of 45 yards, including one downed inside the 20-yard line. Gould was forced to take over the punting duties after Mitch Wishnowsky left Sunday's game with a concussion. This is Gould's 10th-career Special Teams Player of the Week award. His previous honors are listed below. 2005 (with Chicago): Week 9 2006 (with



More than coach and player: 49ers' Kyle Shanahan considers Deebo Samuel a friend

By Rohan Chakravarthi
Jan 12

When thinking about Kyle Shanahan and Deebo Samuel, you normally refer to the creative methods that Kyle Shanahan utilizes his star receiver and the playmaking ability of Samuel to execute those play calls. However, there's much more to the relationship between the two than just the electrifying performances on Sundays, which Kyle Shanahan alluded to in his daily presser Wednesday. Deebo Samuel has always been an animated and vibrant individual, most notably through his energy on the field and leading up to games on Sundays, so it's no surprise that the head coach and receiver are able to easily connect on a daily basis. "[We talk about anything]," Shanahan stated. "Deebo's a real easy guy to talk to. He's not doing much on special teams during



49ers' George Kittle on Trent Williams: 'He's the best football player I've ever played with'

By David Bonilla
Jan 13

Pro Football Focus awarded San Francisco 49ers Tackle Trent Williams its highest overall grade for the 2021 season. In fact, his 98.3 overall grade was the highest ever from the analytics site. 🥇 Highest single-season PFF grade ever🥇 98.5 run-blocking grade (1st in NFL) @TrentW71: PFF's Best Overall Player this season pic.twitter.com/0LjTwb6CHs— PFF (@PFF) January 13,



49ers at Cowboys offensive player grades

By Rohan Chakravarthi
Jan 19

The 49ers defeated the Dallas Cowboys in thrilling fashion Sunday, as the game went down to the wire, with San Francisco ultimately winning 23-17. The offense was no slouch, as the team rushed for 170 yards, had exceptional blocking, and overcame Jimmy Garoppolo's late game miscues to hold on and defeat their longtime rivals. Here are the player grades for Sunday's matchup: Jimmy Garoppolo: C Perhaps the most polarizing player on the field Sunday, Garoppolo started the game on a roll, completing 11/13 passes for 91 yards, having San Francisco in full control of the game. But, his late game errors cannot be excused, as he overthrew multiple receivers, while also giving the Cowboys seven points off his


Featured

More by Oscar Aparicio

More Articles

Share 49ersWebzone