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***2014-2015 NHL Regular Season Discussion Thread ***

Originally posted by Jcool:
Originally posted by Garcia:
Not sure if posted,

but Ilya Kovalchuk just retired, lol.

Walking away from 77 million...

At some point, with 20 million in the bank already, I think he figured being with his family and walking away at a high level was more important than the remaining millions.
Originally posted by OnTheClock:
Originally posted by Jcool:
Originally posted by Garcia:
Not sure if posted,

but Ilya Kovalchuk just retired, lol.

Walking away from 77 million...

At some point, with 20 million in the bank already, I think he figured being with his family and walking away at a high level was more important than the remaining millions.


He will probably sit out a year and then play KHL.
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

I don't think I've ever seen that in hockey.
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

I've never seen anything like it, but I suppose it's possible. However, choosing to be a "switch shooter" in hockey would be somewhat impractical. Remember, a hockey stick is curved along the blade. It's not like the blade is flat and an individual could simply switch hands at any given point; the blade of the stick forces the shooter to either front-hand or back-hand the puck. That said, it would be pretty cool if someone perfected both types of shots with both hands.
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

some players can, but it likley does not provide as much value as it does to the game of baseball.

Hockey players would need both left and right curved sticks as opposed to one bat.

Gordie howe used to shoot from both hands.
Originally posted by Byisgod:
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

I've never seen anything like it, but I suppose it's possible. However, choosing to be a "switch shooter" in hockey would be somewhat impractical. Remember, a hockey stick is curved along the blade. It's not like the blade is flat and an individual could simply switch hands at any given point; the blade of the stick forces the shooter to either front-hand or back-hand the puck. That said, it would be pretty cool if someone perfected both types of shots with both hands.

thanks never thought of that
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

No, it would be too impractical to train.

A hockey stick has a blade (the bottom) that curves to make an inward concave. If I'm a right hand shot, the toe of the stick (the very tip) curves to the left. This creates a pocket that players use to handle the puck, and its also how you generate a shot. The 2 main ways a puck is shot is with the flex of the stick and the curve. When you shoot a puck, your lower hand and top hand go opposite directions to bend/flex the stick. This way when the puck leaves the stick, it creates a whiplash effect as the stick flexes back to straight.

The curve on the stick (the very bottom of the stick) also helps create the shot. The puck usually rests on the heel of the blade (the base of where the bottom connects the shaft) and during the shot process rolls from heel to toe. This generates spin on the puck, similar to baseball the spin creates velocity.

There are rules to the curve on the stick to limit how much of an angle you have. Too much angle and the shot is more powerful, but with less aim. Players choose the flex based on their preferred shot and how they want to handle the puck. For example, a Center wants to emphasize passing and so typically picks a curve with less angle, which is generally better for passing and puck handling. A winger who is a goal scorer wants a lot of curve to emphasize a wrist shot typically (3 types of shots; slap shot which has the big wind up, wrist shot has a medium wind up, snap shot is quickest. Also a backhand shot which is very different to form).

For flex, players typically play with around 100 - to - 120 flex. The higher the flex rating, the more stiff. The lower the flex, the more flexible and easier to bend. More flex typically creates more shot, but there is a "sweet spot" of flex based your size strength. For example, if you are a 6-4 240lbs guy with a 60 flex stick, your stick will snap as you bend it in a shot because it can't take the maximum amount of power you put on it.

I'm 5'7 and the best flex for me is an 80 flex which is pretty low.

Edit:
The possible benefit for switching from left hand to right hand is typically you want to play "opposite your hand" for scoring purposes. For example, a right hand shot wants to play Left Wing for better scoring, because when you are shooting on the goalie you have a better angle to score from (your shot would be coming from closer to the middle of the ice, generating more possible angles to score from). However, playing opposite your hand also means you have to catch passes on your back hand more often which is very difficult.

You will see players normally playing their strong side (left hand plays Left Wing) but then switch to opposite (left hand plays right wing) while on the Power Play to emphasize scoring.

Also, countries typically have different training methods. For example in Canada, they train youngsters to have their dominant hand as the top hand on the stick. In the US typically you are taught to use your dominant hand as the bottom hand.
[ Edited by SunDevilNiner79 on Jul 15, 2013 at 10:57 PM ]
Los Angeles Flyers would become my second favorite team if they land Giroux and Hartnell
Originally posted by SunDevilNiner79:
Originally posted by hofer36:
im new to hockey but it is a great exciting game...one question for those who know the game...i hear announcers say a player is left hand shooter or a right hand shooter and i presume it is equivalent to baseball--are some players equally adept from either side (switchhitters if you will)?

No, it would be too impractical to train.

A hockey stick has a blade (the bottom) that curves to make an inward concave. If I'm a right hand shot, the toe of the stick (the very tip) curves to the left. This creates a pocket that players use to handle the puck, and its also how you generate a shot. The 2 main ways a puck is shot is with the flex of the stick and the curve. When you shoot a puck, your lower hand and top hand go opposite directions to bend/flex the stick. This way when the puck leaves the stick, it creates a whiplash effect as the stick flexes back to straight.

The curve on the stick (the very bottom of the stick) also helps create the shot. The puck usually rests on the heel of the blade (the base of where the bottom connects the shaft) and during the shot process rolls from heel to toe. This generates spin on the puck, similar to baseball the spin creates velocity.

There are rules to the curve on the stick to limit how much of an angle you have. Too much angle and the shot is more powerful, but with less aim. Players choose the flex based on their preferred shot and how they want to handle the puck. For example, a Center wants to emphasize passing and so typically picks a curve with less angle, which is generally better for passing and puck handling. A winger who is a goal scorer wants a lot of curve to emphasize a wrist shot typically (3 types of shots; slap shot which has the big wind up, wrist shot has a medium wind up, snap shot is quickest. Also a backhand shot which is very different to form).

For flex, players typically play with around 100 - to - 120 flex. The higher the flex rating, the more stiff. The lower the flex, the more flexible and easier to bend. More flex typically creates more shot, but there is a "sweet spot" of flex based your size strength. For example, if you are a 6-4 240lbs guy with a 60 flex stick, your stick will snap as you bend it in a shot because it can't take the maximum amount of power you put on it.

I'm 5'7 and the best flex for me is an 80 flex which is pretty low.

Edit:
The possible benefit for switching from left hand to right hand is typically you want to play "opposite your hand" for scoring purposes. For example, a right hand shot wants to play Left Wing for better scoring, because when you are shooting on the goalie you have a better angle to score from (your shot would be coming from closer to the middle of the ice, generating more possible angles to score from). However, playing opposite your hand also means you have to catch passes on your back hand more often which is very difficult.

You will see players normally playing their strong side (left hand plays Left Wing) but then switch to opposite (left hand plays right wing) while on the Power Play to emphasize scoring.

Also, countries typically have different training methods. For example in Canada, they train youngsters to have their dominant hand as the top hand on the stick. In the US typically you are taught to use your dominant hand as the bottom hand.

Canadian here; just wanted to clear something up. Stick curves are about puck control on the forehand. They don't make shots any faster. A deep stick curve makes it easier to play on the forehand because the puck tends to move more to the "pocket" of the curve creating more consistency for the player who can shoot/pass the puck from the same spot on his blade more often. The second effect is it imparts more spin on the puck (which you mentioned) which which again allows for more control and accuracy in either a wrist shot or pass. So even in the different forward positions it is still a matter of preference and up to the individuals comfort with forehand puck control and spin when choosing a blade curve.
Man... so much less hockey news than NFL news.
Originally posted by young9er:
Canadian here; just wanted to clear something up. Stick curves are about puck control on the forehand. They don't make shots any faster. A deep stick curve makes it easier to play on the forehand because the puck tends to move more to the "pocket" of the curve creating more consistency for the player who can shoot/pass the puck from the same spot on his blade more often. The second effect is it imparts more spin on the puck (which you mentioned) which which again allows for more control and accuracy in either a wrist shot or pass. So even in the different forward positions it is still a matter of preference and up to the individuals comfort with forehand puck control and spin when choosing a blade curve.


I have to disagree. Greater curve definitely puts more velocity on your stick, it probably is because its coming from a more consistent pocket on your stick, but the added spin adds velocity.

I played ice hockey growing up and still play, I could go outside and do it right now. Give me a stick with more curve and my shot will have more velocity.

Having more spin on an object (puck, baseball, football) increases its velocity when it travels in the air.

Heres a little physics thing I found online for spin on a football

http://courses.physics.northwestern.edu/Phyx125/football.pdf
Originally posted by OnTheClock:
Man... so much less hockey news than NFL news.

no freaking kidding. less than NBA news. Hockey has crept up to #2 favorite sport for me. and boy have my beloved Blackhawks been sitting on their asses in FA yet again like my beloved SF Giants after winning it all. i know we've traded players but haven't gotten one significant signing of FA C
Oh Captain Serious

Regular season and Preseason schedules have been released, as well as the re-aligned divisions