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The Official GREATEST OFFSEASON IN NBA HISTORY

  • jrg
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 110,067
First NBA Power Rankings

1. Lakers
2. Heat
3. Celtics
4. Magic
5. Bulls






















27. Cavaliers
[ Edited by jrg on Sep 25, 2010 at 11:44 PM ]
Originally posted by LA9erFan:
Looks like the 4 team trade is closer to happening.

Or not...

Quote:

A person close to the ongoing trade discussions surrounding Carmelo Anthony now puts the odds of the deal being completed at only forty percent.

The source said that the talks had "definitely" taken a step back from where they were.

On Friday night, the trade appeared close to complete



Quote:
The Nuggets are wavering on accepting a proposed trade for Carmelo Anthony and it could lead to the deal unraveling.

"Good will is fading fast between Denver and everyone else in this deal," writes Sam Amick. "NJ, Charlotte, and Utah not thrilled with how it's being handled."
  • jrg
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 110,067
The new "Dwight Howard" rule

NBA expands rules on technicals

ESPN.com
Archive
NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.

At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.

Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:

• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.

• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.

• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.

• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.

In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.

Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the change.

"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."

Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.

Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.

"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."

For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.

"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."

NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.

Henry Abbott is a senior NBA writer for ESPN.com.
Originally posted by jrg:
The new "Dwight Howard" rule

NBA expands rules on technicals

ESPN.com
Archive
NBA referees will have more reasons to issue technical fouls next season.

At the referees' annual meeting in Jersey City, N.J., on Thursday, the league announced the guidelines for technical fouls will expand to include "overt" player reactions to referee calls.

Referees have been instructed to call a technical for:

• Players making aggressive gestures, such as air punches, anywhere on the court.

• Demonstrative disagreement, such as when a player incredulously raises his hands, or smacks his own arm to demonstrate how he was fouled.

• Running directly at an official to complain about a call.

• Excessive inquiries about a call, even in a civilized tone.

In addition, referees have been instructed to consider calling technicals on players who use body language to question or demonstrate displeasure, or say things like, "Come on!" They can also consider technicals for players who "take the long path to the official", walking across the court to make their case.

Ron Johnson, the NBA's senior vice president of referee operations, said audience research was a major factor behind the change.

"Our players are more personally connected to fans than any other sports," Johnson said. "We don't have masks. ... There's nothing you can hide on the expression of an NBA players. ... People expect hockey players to be fighting. They expect baseball managers to be kicking dirt on umpires. But that's not our game. That's not what our fans want. They tell us in many many ways and I think we have to adjust to meet the needs of our league and our fans. It's a business."

Some reactions will not be penalized, Johnson said. "Heat of the moment" reactions, like a defensive player briefly raising his hands to show he had proper position, will be acceptable.

Johnson also said players showing frustration with themselves will not be penalized, and players will still be able to discuss the game with the referees.

"We want referees and players to talk to understand each other," Johnson said. "If it's infrequent and not distracting, that's fine."

For the 2005-06 season, the NBA announced a similar crackdown, but the effect was short-lived. Officials say this time they expect the new policies to stick.

"We don't want our players looking like they're complaining about calls on the court because it makes them look like complainers," Johnson said. "You do that six times in a game, it really starts to look bad on television. A lot of these things may not look as bad in the arena. But on TV, when attention is focused on it, it stands out."

NBA coaches were informed of the changes last week. Beginning Sept. 29th, the league will make presentations on the new rules to the players in all NBA cities.

Henry Abbott is a senior NBA writer for ESPN.com.

Welcome to 4 pages ago.
melo deal dead

or

"dormant"

according to stein