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Be the Expert: How do we overcome these challenges vs. Seattle?

Another stoppage in the middle of the game...
Run the ball consistently (30+ carries) and play turnover free. Do that and we win. Period. As much as I and the world respects Seattle my heart tells me we have the better team top to bottom and usually the better team wins. Were not a fancy team and we don't need to get cute. Just execute and don't fall into the 12th man trap. If Tampa Bay can handle it why cant we? #Time to Ball#
3 and 4 we have been doing signals and silent counts the entire playoffs
Have to produce yards on first down. They will expect us to run every first down, which hopefully we won't do. They will stack the box and probably bring Thomas down in there for run support also. Have to beat them deep with Vernon a few times to get them to back off the line. Bubble screens to WR on first or second down would be a welcome sight, we can't be living in 3rd and 8+ the whole game.
Originally posted by hubbyt:
Run the ball consistently (30+ carries) and play turnover free. Do that and we win. Period. As much as I and the world respects Seattle my heart tells me we have the better team top to bottom and usually the better team wins. Were not a fancy team and we don't need to get cute. Just execute and don't fall into the 12th man trap. If Tampa Bay can handle it why cant we? #Time to Ball#

Agreed... Especially with the cute part. Don't need to go to the line of scrimmage with 4 plays. NEED to send the play in with at least 12 seconds remaining on the play clock; maybe 15.
Originally posted by TheG0RE49er:
we need to run some screens (which we never do for some reason). play action roll outs, and Kaep has to buy some time for our WRs to get open.

take advantage of the defense being extra aggressive. we can draw some penalties or catch them off guard with some deep passes early on.

hopefully, we can actually make something happen on special teams. we need a a big return or two, even if it doesn't result in a TD.

Seahawks tend to blow up screens by playing like we do -- man to man and allow free roaming 'backers to rush and/or using stunts. I saw the Saints not have much success as far as this. The linebackers can redirect easier than linemen, and theirs are very talented and very athletic and can knife through pretty easily usually to shut down screens.

Seattle's defense is susceptible to the following:

- Quick players/quick routes.

- Crossing/drag routes (to an extent): They allow them, but it depends how much punishment or risk of punishment you want to take. You're going to have to successfully run some clear-out routes to avoid that. Seattle likes to punish you over the middle with their safeties and linebackers to discourage you from doing it often in the game.

- Double moves (if you have the time for them), which kind of applies to quick stuff because the Seattle secondary for the most part are not great at turning upfield quickly and defending deep passes.


And that's about it.
Originally posted by OnTheClock:
Originally posted by TheG0RE49er:
we need to run some screens (which we never do for some reason). play action roll outs, and Kaep has to buy some time for our WRs to get open.

take advantage of the defense being extra aggressive. we can draw some penalties or catch them off guard with some deep passes early on.

hopefully, we can actually make something happen on special teams. we need a a big return or two, even if it doesn't result in a TD.

Seahawks tend to blow up screens by playing like we do -- man to man and allow free roaming 'backers to rush and/or using stunts. I saw the Saints not have much success as far as this. The linebackers can redirect easier than linemen, and theirs are very talented and very athletic and can knife through pretty easily usually to shut down screens.

Seattle's defense is susceptible to the following:

- Quick players/quick routes.

- Crossing/drag routes (to an extent): They allow them, but it depends how much punishment or risk of punishment you want to take. You're going to have to successfully run some clear-out routes to avoid that. Seattle likes to punish you over the middle with their safeties and linebackers to discourage you from doing it often in the game.

- Double moves (if you have the time for them), which kind of applies to quick stuff because the Seattle secondary for the most part are not great at turning upfield quickly and defending deep passes.


And that's about it.

I think the 49ers have an answer for each of your points. Below in order:

- Crabtree and Patton

- AB and VD

- Crabtree

I think the key will be pass blocking. If the 49ers can pass block, this game changes, dramatically. Same goes for the Seahawks. If Wilson is given time to throw, he will find an open receiver with the 49ers secondary.

It's scary how the recipe for beating both teams seems to be identical.
NO TURNOVERS! Our RB's and WR's need to make sure to hold on to the ball because the Hawks are going to rip it out and hit you so hard it pops out. HOLD ON TO THE BALL.
I think the creator of this thread is the seachickens defensive coordinator in disguise, too lazy to come up with his own ideas and gameplan.
Originally posted by Geeked:
I think the 49ers have an answer for each of your points. Below in order:

- Crabtree and Patton

- AB and VD

- Crabtree

I think the key will be pass blocking. If the 49ers can pass block, this game changes, dramatically. Same goes for the Seahawks. If Wilson is given time to throw, he will find an open receiver with the 49ers secondary.

It's scary how the recipe for beating both teams seems to be identical.

Pass blocking was great against the best front seven in the playoffs, so yeah.
Originally posted by BleedsRedNGold:
Originally posted by Geeked:
I think the 49ers have an answer for each of your points. Below in order:

- Crabtree and Patton

- AB and VD

- Crabtree

I think the key will be pass blocking. If the 49ers can pass block, this game changes, dramatically. Same goes for the Seahawks. If Wilson is given time to throw, he will find an open receiver with the 49ers secondary.

It's scary how the recipe for beating both teams seems to be identical.

Pass blocking was great against the best front seven in the playoffs, so yeah.

Sorry, I tend to look at the season in it's entirety. I'll restrict future assessments to naive (last game). My bad.
mcdonald will play Fullback probably.
Originally posted by KeenaTurner:
1) Lock-down secondary. Seattle has the best secondary that the NFL has seen in a long, long time. They lock down receivers, even good receivers, with man to man, press coverage, which allows them to commit more players to the line of scrimmage. How do you see our receivers getting open? Which leads us to the biggest concern...

2) Kaepernick's inability to go through progressions. When your prime receiver(s) is locked up, the QB has to move through his progressions to other options. This has been an achilles heel of Kaepernick, who seems to panic when his first option is covered. I've been hoping they would establish some easy check-downs to backs, but that's not happening much. How do you think Kap will responds when he looks out and sees his first/second options covered?

3) The inability to audible. The crowd noise will likely prevent audibles from the line of scrimmage. Hand signals are tough to count on. The Seahawks seem to play off the noise by shifting though different defensive sets before the snap. How do you think the 49ers handle this?

4) Snap count. Related to the above. When you can't hear the QB's snap call, you have to be looking over at the center/QB. My lineman friends tell me that's a disadvantage because it shaves time off your release, when you are looking sideways. The only thing I've heard to counter it is timed snaps, but those are iffy.

5) Lack of fullback. Let's assume Tukuafu is out...I assume Dixon will have the starting fullback role. At 230, he's not the 293 pound load of Tuke…Do you think he will be enough?

Thanks for your insights, and GO NINERS.

1. The state of the team is much different now, if the secondary tries to go one on one, they will be burnt. To me, Seattle's secondary is over rated, especially with needing to worry about crabs, things will open up for our offense and our pass defense is actually rated better.

2. Again, with Seattle concentrating on Crabs, working through the progression becomes easier and faster, much like the second meeting.

3. The way to deal with this, simple #1 keep calm and don't let it get to them, #2 I would visit the local drug store and purchase some ear plugs and practice with no sound at all and get accustomed to it. #3, audible gets easier if we play with the no huddle throughout the entire game, which is something that I haven't seen this year, go no huddle, keeping seattle's defense guessing and keep making plays, 9ers cannot let up.

4. Snap count is actually easy, when I played football, as a WR and TE, my coach would always tell us to watch the ball, so that no matter what the count is-you are almost never off sides. Offensive linemen can practice the silent count and it's actually easier then with sound.

5. I think with Anthony Dixon being faster than Miller and having equal to or greater pass catching skills, I think this might be a dimension that can really help the offense. In this respect, to needing size, I think Dixon at 233 compared to Miller's 248, really is not a factor. From my impressions of the action that I have seen, Dixon appears to be a very good pass blocker too, in picking up the blitzes and he actually might be better than Miller, but overall I don't think there will be to much of an impact here.

This is just my 2 cents, any perspective could be the correct answer, but this is just how I am viewing some of the issues brought up. Absolutely, GO 49ERS!!!
I tend to agree with the other posters who said the biggest problem is Seattle CHEATHAWKS DB's mugging, grabbing, holding, tackling our WR's and TE's 20, 30, 40, 50 yards downfield. Way past the 5 yard area.

If the CHEATHAWKS are playing this game of "chicken" with the refs daring them to throw the flag then play the same game back. WR's and TE's should push off on every single play. You might get a penalty sometimes but it won't happen every time. They can't slow down the game that much. Plus the do tend to favor the offense when there is contact. Michael Irvin used to be the expert at the push off. Have Crabtree and Boldin do that. The are both pretty big. So push off on Sherman and shove him to the ground. Don't just stand there and wait for him to shove you to the ground. Dare the refs to throw the penalty like they dare the refs to throw the penalty.
Originally posted by Baldie:
NO TURNOVERS! Our RB's and WR's need to make sure to hold on to the ball because the Hawks are going to rip it out and hit you so hard it pops out. HOLD ON TO THE BALL.

yeah. they need to work on this. crabtree and davis hold the ball fairly loose when they have it