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Analysis from the Green Bay Packers coaches film

  • thl408
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Originally posted by Joecool:
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Here's another example of how I meant Brooks played poorly by giving up his containment. This is on GB's TD. Bear in mind, this was 3rd down.

Knowing it's a passing situation, and trying to get more pressure up the middle, we run a DT stunt. McD is going to drive towards the inside shoulder of the G and Justin Smith is going to loop around in between the G and T. Brooks needs to take a rush towards the outside shoulder of the T to set this up.



You see McDonald pushes the Guard in, if Brooks takes the outside shoulder we've got Rodgers in a bad place.



But you see how Brooks takes an inside move putting 3 rushers in the same area and leaving the outside wide open for Rodgers to escape to



This puts Justin Smith trying to run down Aaron Rodgers - I really doubt that's the matchup Fango wanted. If Rodgers had been forced to stay in the pocket he doesn't have the angle to get the ball into Nelson.

Could that have been a two level stunt? I have seen us do that before where Justin and McDonald both crash hard to their right and Aldon stunts around both of them. From what it seemed, Justin Smith was in proper position even after Rodgers rolled.

I just can't seem to believe that Brooks made that big of a mistake. One that would completely ruin the fundamental call of the play.

That's a good point. But then I would really question that kind of playcall this close to the endzone. A two level stunt takes a long time to develop doesn't it? And calling that kind of stunt this close to the endzone is questionable to me.
Originally posted by thl408:
Originally posted by Joecool:
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Here's another example of how I meant Brooks played poorly by giving up his containment. This is on GB's TD. Bear in mind, this was 3rd down.

Knowing it's a passing situation, and trying to get more pressure up the middle, we run a DT stunt. McD is going to drive towards the inside shoulder of the G and Justin Smith is going to loop around in between the G and T. Brooks needs to take a rush towards the outside shoulder of the T to set this up.



You see McDonald pushes the Guard in, if Brooks takes the outside shoulder we've got Rodgers in a bad place.



But you see how Brooks takes an inside move putting 3 rushers in the same area and leaving the outside wide open for Rodgers to escape to



This puts Justin Smith trying to run down Aaron Rodgers - I really doubt that's the matchup Fango wanted. If Rodgers had been forced to stay in the pocket he doesn't have the angle to get the ball into Nelson.

Could that have been a two level stunt? I have seen us do that before where Justin and McDonald both crash hard to their right and Aldon stunts around both of them. From what it seemed, Justin Smith was in proper position even after Rodgers rolled.

I just can't seem to believe that Brooks made that big of a mistake. One that would completely ruin the fundamental call of the play.

That's a good point. But then I would really question that kind of playcall this close to the endzone. A two level stunt takes a long time to develop doesn't it? And calling that kind of stunt this close to the endzone is questionable to me.

Good points all around!!!!

Originally posted by Joecool:
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Here's another example of how I meant Brooks played poorly by giving up his containment. This is on GB's TD. Bear in mind, this was 3rd down.

Knowing it's a passing situation, and trying to get more pressure up the middle, we run a DT stunt. McD is going to drive towards the inside shoulder of the G and Justin Smith is going to loop around in between the G and T. Brooks needs to take a rush towards the outside shoulder of the T to set this up.



You see McDonald pushes the Guard in, if Brooks takes the outside shoulder we've got Rodgers in a bad place.



But you see how Brooks takes an inside move putting 3 rushers in the same area and leaving the outside wide open for Rodgers to escape to



This puts Justin Smith trying to run down Aaron Rodgers - I really doubt that's the matchup Fango wanted. If Rodgers had been forced to stay in the pocket he doesn't have the angle to get the ball into Nelson.

Could that have been a two level stunt? I have seen us do that before where Justin and McDonald both crash hard to their right and Aldon stunts around both of them. From what it seemed, Justin Smith was in proper position even after Rodgers rolled.

I just can't seem to believe that Brooks made that big of a mistake. One that would completely ruin the fundamental call of the play.
I would be really surprised if Fangio put Justin Smith in a position where he had to contain Rodgers in the open field on an outside stunt moving that far across the formation. We'll run those double stunts always to the inside, that way we never lose contain on the QB. Giving up contain on a qb is a fundamental no-no, you want to keep them in the pocket and collapse it. Fangio always tries to put his players in positive situations where there not being asked to do something they're not capable of doing. As much as I love Justin Smith he's not a guy you want out in the open field on a player - especially an athlete like Rodgers. I think it was a mental lapse by Brooks, overall he's played at a high level. This game was an aberration, he didn't play horrible, just not at a consistent, solid, disciplined level.
  • fryet
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Originally posted by Joecool:
Could that have been a two level stunt? I have seen us do that before where Justin and McDonald both crash hard to their right and Aldon stunts around both of them. From what it seemed, Justin Smith was in proper position even after Rodgers rolled.

I just can't seem to believe that Brooks made that big of a mistake. One that would completely ruin the fundamental call of the play.

Would you call such a long developing blitz at the goal line? You have to expect a quick pass.
Originally posted by verb1der:
Nice review man! I ate that up.

Lol, no lie
  • thl408
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Here's the biggest play of the game that is the least talked about. 4th quarter, game tied.

49ers: Basic flood with a bit of a rub
GB: Cover3 zone (Tampa2)

It's a big money down and the 49ers put their big dogs on the same side of the field - Crabs, Boldin (slot), and VD. GB, already gashed for a few big Kap runs, is not going to let that happen again. They go with zone coverage to keep their eyes on Kap.



Below: The depth at which Boldin and Crabs run their routes is critical. Both to get a rub element in case it's man coverage and to ensure that they run past the first down marker. VD is running a clear out to occupy the saftey(s) on that side of the field. Notice how Crabs breaks on his route right after Boldin has stopped on his route. If there was a CB playing man coverage on Crabs, that CB should get picked by Boldin (or the CB manned on Boldin). It's not man coverage, it's zone. So now the flood concept comes into play. Both #31 (House) and #33 (Hyde) think that Boldin is their current assignment. The safeties are occupied by a streaking VD.


Below: Kap has issues of his own. Iupati has lost leverage and will be giving up the pressure.


Below: Same time, different view. Kap squeezes through to escape pressure.


Below: Once Kap escapes, the CBs on that side of the field are frozen in their tracks as they fear the scramble. #33 (blue circle) is not going to let Kap scramble. However, in doing so, he isn't covering anyone. Crabs finds the soft spot in the zone.


Below: Kap throwing on the run.


Below: It's not the best throw and Crabs has to adjust his body.


Kap showing off his escape-ability and ability to throw on the run. Crabs showing hands and body control. Solid playcall to work the zone coverage. 49ers earn their money on this down.


[ Edited by thl408 on Jan 8, 2014 at 4:50 PM ]
My only concern for the Carolina game, and it's a game changer, is can our Oline hold on the pass protection against that Carolina D or is Kap going to be running for his life like last time.

Hopefully a healthy offense personnel will stop the Panthers from stacking the box and pinning their ears back on the blitz.
Originally posted by Buchy:
My only concern for the Carolina game, and it's a game changer, is can our Oline hold on the pass protection against that Carolina D or is Kap going to be running for his life like last time.

Hopefully a healthy offense personnel will stop the Panthers from stacking the box and pinning their ears back on the blitz.

Thats the game right there. If we give Kap time to throw, the Panthers are toast. If we cant protect Kap, were in for another LONG day like our previous meeting.

Having Crabtree will help alot. If we get Kap blocking help, Crabtree will at least be a solid safety net that Kap can lock onto under pressure. Earlier this year Boldin was just doubled, and the pressure left Kap looking to scramble. Problem is the Panthers ILB's were waiting for him.
Originally posted by thl408:
Here's the biggest play of the game that is the least talked about. 4th quarter, game tied.

49ers: Basic flood with a bit of a rub
GB: Cover3 zone (Tampa2)

It's a big money down and the 49ers put their big dogs on the same side of the field - Crabs, Boldin (slot), and VD. GB, already gashed for a few big Kap runs, is not going to let that happen again. They go with zone coverage to keep their eyes on Kap.



Below: The depth at which Boldin and Crabs run their routes is critical. Both to get a rub element in case it's man coverage and to ensure that they run past the first down marker. VD is running a clear out to occupy the saftey(s) on that side of the field. Notice how Crabs breaks on his route right after Boldin has stopped on his route. If there was a CB playing man coverage on Crabs, that CB should get picked by Boldin (or the CB manned on Boldin). It's not man coverage, it's zone. So now the flood concept comes into play. Both #31 (House) and #33 (Hyde) think that Boldin is their current assignment. The safeties are occupied by a streaking VD.


Below: Kap has issues of his own. Iupati has lost leverage and will be giving up the pressure.


Below: Same time, different view. Kap squeezes through to escape pressure.


Below: Once Kap escapes, the CBs on that side of the field are frozen in their tracks as they fear the scramble. #33 (blue circle) is not going to let Kap scramble. However, in doing so, he isn't covering anyone. Crabs finds the soft spot in the zone.


Below: Kap throwing on the run.


Below: It's not the best throw and Crabs has to adjust his body.


Kap showing off his escape-ability and ability to throw on the run. Crabs showing hands and body control. Solid playcall to work the zone coverage. 49ers earn their money on this down.


great breakdown of that play, I remember watching the film and saying, "wow" when I saw that one. Without that first down I don't think we win the game.
  • thl408
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After a Kap 24 yard scramble where GB was playing man coverage, there was a defensive hold on an incomplete pass to Crabs. Then this pass.

49ers: All verticals concept
GB: Cover2 man

The 49ers make this playcall thinking GB would be in zone coverage at the linebacker level since they just got burned with a 24 yard Kap run moments ago. All verticals will attack the deep safties with numbers, in this case 5 WRs. However, this is man coverage underneath, which makes it harder for the playcall to succeed because the man defenders will follow their WRs instead of playing an underdeath zone.

This isn't a long bomb type of route concept. It is designed to be a quick throw, as Kap displays here. If the defender on the WR is in a trail position, then throw it over the top. If the defender is even with, or over the top of the WR, make it a back shoulder throw.



Below: The ball was just snapped. The blue lines show which GB defender is manned up on which 49er. There's a CB with a '?' on his head is because I am unsure of his assignment. It seems like it should be man coverage with the rest of this team mates, but it won't appear that way a split second later. #42 is the safety, Burnett. Notice his spacing between the hash marks and the numbers on the field. Red lines were drawn to help illustrate his distance from the hash marks to the numbers on the field.


Below: Kap hs decided to make the throw in this pic and his arm is about to start his windup. Notice how every CB has their hips turned to run with their WR. Everyone except the CB that had the '?' on his head. He is looking in the backfield. My only guess is that he is the spy to prevent another Kap scramble. He is shown doing the "he's not my guy anymore" tap to Boldin as Boldin runs past him. #42 the safety has now slid closer to the numbers on the field, and farther from VD.

Applying the vertical concept, Kap sees that AJ Hawk is not trailing VD. This means the throw will be a back shoulder throw.


Below: Kap in the middle of his windup. All the CBs are running with their WR, except for the CB on Boldin. This forces the safety to respect Boldin and shade closer to Boldin. My guess is that the CB letting Boldin run by is playing his assignment as the spy on Kap.


Below: The ball is in the air (red arrow) and #42 has taken a couple false steps (even closer to the numbers on the field) making his ability to play the ball that much more difficult. He turns his hips to drive towards the ball.


Below: Every false step #42 took mattered as he barely missed batting the pass down.


The play: All verticals works better against zone underneath coverage because it leaves the underneath defenders covering grass while all the WRs attack the deep safties. Although the playcall isn't perfect against the coverage (man under), because Kap has gashed GB for several big runs GB was not going to play man coverage all around and had one of their CBs assigned to a spy role. That spy forced the saftey (#42) to help play man coverage on Boldin and that is all the space Kap needs to fire a perfect back shoulder throw to VD.


The all verticals (four verticals) concept is relevant to the CAR game as this was what the 49ers were trying to do late in the 4th quarter. We may see it again this Sunday.
[ Edited by thl408 on Jan 9, 2014 at 8:18 AM ]
  • thl408
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Originally posted by jonnydel:
great breakdown of that play, I remember watching the film and saying, "wow" when I saw that one. Without that first down I don't think we win the game.

Thanks jonnydel. I'm about to shift focus over to CAR. If you can post your musings about Sunday's upcoming game in the Film Analysis Panthers thread, that be awesome.
Originally posted by thl408:
Here's the biggest play of the game that is the least talked about. 4th quarter, game tied.

49ers: Basic flood with a bit of a rub
GB: Cover3 zone (Tampa2)

It's a big money down and the 49ers put their big dogs on the same side of the field - Crabs, Boldin (slot), and VD. GB, already gashed for a few big Kap runs, is not going to let that happen again. They go with zone coverage to keep their eyes on Kap.



Below: The depth at which Boldin and Crabs run their routes is critical. Both to get a rub element in case it's man coverage and to ensure that they run past the first down marker. VD is running a clear out to occupy the saftey(s) on that side of the field. Notice how Crabs breaks on his route right after Boldin has stopped on his route. If there was a CB playing man coverage on Crabs, that CB should get picked by Boldin (or the CB manned on Boldin). It's not man coverage, it's zone. So now the flood concept comes into play. Both #31 (House) and #33 (Hyde) think that Boldin is their current assignment. The safeties are occupied by a streaking VD.


Below: Kap has issues of his own. Iupati has lost leverage and will be giving up the pressure.


Below: Same time, different view. Kap squeezes through to escape pressure.


Below: Once Kap escapes, the CBs on that side of the field are frozen in their tracks as they fear the scramble. #33 (blue circle) is not going to let Kap scramble. However, in doing so, he isn't covering anyone. Crabs finds the soft spot in the zone.


Below: Kap throwing on the run.


Below: It's not the best throw and Crabs has to adjust his body.


Kap showing off his escape-ability and ability to throw on the run. Crabs showing hands and body control. Solid playcall to work the zone coverage. 49ers earn their money on this down.



thl this is a great breakdown! It really demonstrates what most of us already know. Kap is a great scrambler but he still wants to throw first. And what a throw that one was. A bit inaccurate, but with Kap essentially running to his left he still gets it there.

Another aspect of this play is Kap stepping up in the pocket. He looks comfortable and doesn't seem to panic. In fact, since Kap has got all his receivers back he seems much more comfortable in all aspects of his game; from being in the huddle, to lining up, calling audibles to the actual play. Maybe it's just me, but it seems he has some confidence back.
Jonny/thl408,

Thanks to both of you for the analysis you are providing weekly in this forum. It is awesome to see things broken down for us 'average' fans. I have one question that I haven't seen in any of the threads:

Are we still using the stunts with Justin and Aldon that were so 'infamous' last season, where Justin would hold two guys and allow Aldon to slip through? I haven't noticed it being done or talked about like it was last season.
  • thl408
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^^ Thanks for the kind words, a49fan77. I'm just an average fan as well. I just choose to watch NFL game rewind when the kids go to sleep. I'm going to defer to jonnydel (or anyone else) on this as I am not much versed in Oline/Dline play. I was not aware Broooks had a shaky game versus GB until jonnydel pointed it out. I do agree that I haven't seen much of stunts from Justin and Aldon. Perhaps I'm just not looking for it.
Originally posted by JoeBart324:
thl this is a great breakdown! It really demonstrates what most of us already know. Kap is a great scrambler but he still wants to throw first. And what a throw that one was. A bit inaccurate, but with Kap essentially running to his left he still gets it there.

Another aspect of this play is Kap stepping up in the pocket. He looks comfortable and doesn't seem to panic. In fact, since Kap has got all his receivers back he seems much more comfortable in all aspects of his game; from being in the huddle, to lining up, calling audibles to the actual play. Maybe it's just me, but it seems he has some confidence back.
the confidence in himself was never gone. it was the confidence in his guys to make a play. now everyone going out will make a play, and if they'll make a play he'll make the throw