There are 64 users in the forums

Remember
Not a member? Register Now!

Analysis from the Atlanta Falcons game coaches film

This is a little bit of a side note. But, since I'm here. I have to say I prefer SFO to the Oakland airport. I'm on a layover in Oakland right now. Having been in SFO for a couple layovers and for the last Cards game, I much prefer SFO...... just sayin'
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Exactly, that's why I said in my scouting report that we'll probably line whoever Peterson is shadowing up away from Vernon to try and isolate Vernon on a LB or S across the field, that's how we got him open last time. But, I wouldn't be surprised to see Peterson on Davis if we go 3 wide, also why I say we will probably run a lot of "21" personnel.

That would be interesting if they put Peterson on Vernon, but I don't see it. Vernon blocks 300lb lineman 1-1. Peterson is a heck of a player but 85 would run right through him unless he got help from a LB on a chip. We are simply a matchup nightmare for any team. You play your base defense and we can torch you. You play a Nickel and Gore runs wild. I`d hate to be any defensive coordinator going against a healthy 49er team.
Another possible play:

I really like this to get Boldin over the middle or Frank on a LB

Originally posted by Afrikan:
Originally posted by 49erphan:
Many thanks to Jonnydel and thl408 and others for your great insights and picture/Gif breakdowns.

I have a question about a play that I think was the second 9er offensive play of the 4th quarter. The play looks like a regular pistol play where Kap is choosing to hand off to Dixon on an inside dive or taking off with the ball himself running to the outside. He decided to keep the ball. What made the play look different to me is that Hunter was lined up behind Dixon at the start of the play and he runs to the right with Kap and then as the play develops it sure looks like it turns into an "option-to-the-trailing back" play (I'm not sure what that is properly called). If I remember correctly, it seems like the Falcons might have had an extra cornerback or a safety spying on Kap but who ended up being drawn outside of Kap's running lane by Kap faking a pitch out to Hunter. Kap gained a few yards on the play. Is this a new wrinkle to the pistol - having an option to a trailing back? (Sorry if a I mucked up some of the terminology.)

I remember that play...and that little fake pitch back helped Kaep get a extra yardage...but man those are dangerous plays.

anyway we did something similar with Kaep's very first regular season play time against the Jets.


didn't he first play against the bucs?
Originally posted by Godsleftsock:
Originally posted by Afrikan:
Originally posted by 49erphan:
Many thanks to Jonnydel and thl408 and others for your great insights and picture/Gif breakdowns.

I have a question about a play that I think was the second 9er offensive play of the 4th quarter. The play looks like a regular pistol play where Kap is choosing to hand off to Dixon on an inside dive or taking off with the ball himself running to the outside. He decided to keep the ball. What made the play look different to me is that Hunter was lined up behind Dixon at the start of the play and he runs to the right with Kap and then as the play develops it sure looks like it turns into an "option-to-the-trailing back" play (I'm not sure what that is properly called). If I remember correctly, it seems like the Falcons might have had an extra cornerback or a safety spying on Kap but who ended up being drawn outside of Kap's running lane by Kap faking a pitch out to Hunter. Kap gained a few yards on the play. Is this a new wrinkle to the pistol - having an option to a trailing back? (Sorry if a I mucked up some of the terminology.)

I remember that play...and that little fake pitch back helped Kaep get a extra yardage...but man those are dangerous plays.

anyway we did something similar with Kaep's very first regular season play time against the Jets.


didn't he first play against the bucs?

wow yup you're right I'm way off... I'm wondering if that was the first time we tried the read option with him, a year later.


Originally posted by jonnydel:
Originally posted by 49erphan:
Many thanks to Jonnydel and thl408 and others for your great insights and picture/Gif breakdowns.

I have a question about a play that I think was the second 9er offensive play of the 4th quarter. The play looks like a regular pistol play where Kap is choosing to hand off to Dixon on an inside dive or taking off with the ball himself running to the outside. He decided to keep the ball. What made the play look different to me is that Hunter was lined up behind Dixon at the start of the play and he runs to the right with Kap and then as the play develops it sure looks like it turns into an "option-to-the-trailing back" play (I'm not sure what that is properly called). If I remember correctly, it seems like the Falcons might have had an extra cornerback or a safety spying on Kap but who ended up being drawn outside of Kap's running lane by Kap faking a pitch out to Hunter. Kap gained a few yards on the play. Is this a new wrinkle to the pistol - having an option to a trailing back? (Sorry if a I mucked up some of the terminology.)

It's very similar to the dreaded Ginn option fumbled play against the Rams last year. It's a read option pitch play. One of the reasons I think Atlanta blitzed so much off the edges in the first half was to contain the read option - because it destroyed them the year before, and also to confuse Kaep in the passing game. When we ran the read option in the first half we tried to spread the field with 3 receivers, but Kassim Osgood had a terrible block on the DB who made the play. In the 2nd half, we ran the read option with Dixon, the DE shot down on the dive, and then Kaep took off right, this time, with Hunter as a pitch option. Kaep was outrunning the LB with the CB closing in from the outside. The idea with the pitch play is the it puts the outside defender in a touch spot; if he takes the QB, you pitch, if he takes the pitch man the QB keeps it. To stop the pitch play you have to have a lot of speed from the LB or DE position. The CB took a "half way" approach with trying to get in position to stop both the QB or the pitch. When this happened Kaep faked a pitch, which caused the DB to hesitate just slightly, allowing for Kaep to break through. That's how we got the positive yards.



Below: The fake give to Dixon gets the ILBs flowing to their left. If Dixon was directly behind Kap at the snap, this doesn't happen.


Below: The CB can't fall for the fake pitch unless the QB turns his head. No QB pitches this without looking. The CB still falls for the fake.



Gain of 9


Originally posted by jonnydel:
Here's why the off coverage helped:



As most of us know, we ran an all out blitz. Really, it's cover 0 with no safety in the middle of the field. We blitz with playing man-man, anyone who's man stays in pass pro blitzes. They run a 2 receiver set to the bottom of the screen. ATL tries to run a pick type of screen play at the bottom. They run the inside receiver up the field to block on his DB while Douglas cuts underneath. Our off coverage helps in 2 ways. 1- it allows for Brock to read the play, 2- it prevents Brock from getting "picked off" by the inside receiver/DB. That's why the 2 DB's are staggered in their depth to prevent the pick play.



You see how Brock is able to jump the route immediately, Also, because Rogers is farther off the inside receiver can't create a screen to wall Brock off from the play.



A little more of the same from this angle to show how Brock has room to jump the route.



This is how Brock is able to knock the ball free and Bowman peeled off his blitz when he saw the pass thrown, solid defense, run to the ball.

Nice breakdown. A cushion is only effective against short routes if the CB uses it to read the QB correctly. He is watching the QB's shoulder dip. Brock does that along with pattern recognition to perfection on this play. This guy certainly has a knack for being involved in a big turnover.



Reid with a rare FS blitz.
Originally posted by jonnydel:
I see us running a play like this:



If Peterson shades Boldin like he did last game, I see Boldin over in the "Z"(He's on the "Y" side). With VD being the 2nd TE and MC being the "X" or noted as "ZE".

Because the safety essentially plays deep half away from Peterson this would give in out/in read for Kaep on the safety and corner. Note how he instructs the "x" to go under first. This will cause the Corner to dip in on the "X" route and open up the corner for VD. This, essentially, puts VD 1-1 with the safety towards a corner route. If they run "man" he's 1-1 with a LB to the corner with the deep middle safety being pulled away on the post. If it's man and the safety jumps the corner, Crab should be open over the middle. If both are taken away Kaep has Gore as a checkdown.
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Another possible play:

I really like this to get Boldin over the middle or Frank on a LB


Agreed on the idea of those criss crossing routes to get separation against man coverage. Whereas there are numerous ways to beat zone. There are only a couple ways to beat man coverage. Pick/crossing routes or very good route running. Either Boldin, VD, or Crabs will be single covered and all three can get separation 1 on 1. Kap will have to quickly recognize who it is and make the anticipation throw. I can see some back shoulder throws dialed up. This ARI game will be another big test for Kap and the offense.
[ Edited by thl408 on Dec 28, 2013 at 11:37 PM ]
dp.
[ Edited by Afrikan on Dec 29, 2013 at 12:50 AM ]
Originally posted by thl408:

Gain of 9




man if Vernon choose to block #50, Kaep or Kendell might have took it all the way.

Maybe the play calls for him to presume that if Kaep does keep the ball, it is because #50 bit on the run to Dixon anyway...so to just block the next level person.
Originally posted by thl408:
Originally posted by jonnydel:
Originally posted by 49erphan:
Many thanks to Jonnydel and thl408 and others for your great insights and picture/Gif breakdowns.

I have a question about a play that I think was the second 9er offensive play of the 4th quarter. The play looks like a regular pistol play where Kap is choosing to hand off to Dixon on an inside dive or taking off with the ball himself running to the outside. He decided to keep the ball. What made the play look different to me is that Hunter was lined up behind Dixon at the start of the play and he runs to the right with Kap and then as the play develops it sure looks like it turns into an "option-to-the-trailing back" play (I'm not sure what that is properly called). If I remember correctly, it seems like the Falcons might have had an extra cornerback or a safety spying on Kap but who ended up being drawn outside of Kap's running lane by Kap faking a pitch out to Hunter. Kap gained a few yards on the play. Is this a new wrinkle to the pistol - having an option to a trailing back? (Sorry if a I mucked up some of the terminology.)

It's very similar to the dreaded Ginn option fumbled play against the Rams last year. It's a read option pitch play. One of the reasons I think Atlanta blitzed so much off the edges in the first half was to contain the read option - because it destroyed them the year before, and also to confuse Kaep in the passing game. When we ran the read option in the first half we tried to spread the field with 3 receivers, but Kassim Osgood had a terrible block on the DB who made the play. In the 2nd half, we ran the read option with Dixon, the DE shot down on the dive, and then Kaep took off right, this time, with Hunter as a pitch option. Kaep was outrunning the LB with the CB closing in from the outside. The idea with the pitch play is the it puts the outside defender in a touch spot; if he takes the QB, you pitch, if he takes the pitch man the QB keeps it. To stop the pitch play you have to have a lot of speed from the LB or DE position. The CB took a "half way" approach with trying to get in position to stop both the QB or the pitch. When this happened Kaep faked a pitch, which caused the DB to hesitate just slightly, allowing for Kaep to break through. That's how we got the positive yards.



Below: The fake give to Dixon gets the ILBs flowing to their left. If Dixon was directly behind Kap at the snap, this doesn't happen.


Below: The CB can't fall for the fake pitch unless the QB turns his head. No QB pitches this without looking. The CB still falls for the fake.



Gain of 9



Thanks to everyone who posted explanations of what happened on this play. The animated gif showed something that I couldn't tell from the broadcast - where did Falcon number 25 come from in this play? I saw a Falcon cornerback (number 23, I think) leave the area because he was covering Boldin. It looks like Falcon number 25 was covering Vernon Davis until he realized that Davis was blocking and then he picked up Kap running with the ball.

In my memory, it seemed like Kap had only picked up a few yards rather than nine yards. Whew, the big strides fool you sometimes into thinking he's not moving as fast as he really is. The Falcon safety did a nice job of closing on Kap.
Here is Grant Cohn's article claiming that Kap's footwork is the reason for his failure and supporting the theory that Kap is a one read QB. Judge for yourself...

http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2013/12/commentary/kaepernicks-foot-faults/

Watch Colin Kaepernick's feet this Sunday.

The 49ers play the Cardinals in Arizona and the game means very little to the Niners. Win or lose, the 49ers will make the playoffs. They'll be a wild-card team if the Seahawks beat the Rams, and the Seahawks probably will beat the Rams.

And the 49ers probably will beat the Cardinals. You already know the Cardinals' quarterback, Carson Palmer, will throw at least one interception. He's already thrown 21 this season.

After Palmer takes his first big hit of the game, he will want to crash on the couch next to you and drink hot cocoa. He doesn't like taking hits. That's why he quit on the Bengals in 2011.

Consider this game against the Cardinals a dress rehearsal for what the 49ers will face in the playoffs. It's a road game and the Cardinals are playoff-caliber. If the 49ers make it to the Super Bowl, they most likely will have to win three straight playoff games on the road. That's the challenge ahead of them. If anything could hold them back from rising to that challenge, it is Kaepernick's feet.

He still can run with them, but his footwork and technique in the pocket are poor. If he can show some improvement in those areas on Sunday against the Cardinals, who's to say he can't win three straight road playoff games? The sky is the limit.

Bill Walsh always said the quarterback defines the limit of the offense. Kaepernick does certain things to increase the limit of the 49ers' current offense – he's very good at throwing on the run – but he does other things that limit the limit. His technique in the pocket is junior varsity. And that's problematic, considering Jim Harbaugh makes Kaepernick drop straight back about 90 percent of the time.

You saw issues with Kaepernick's footwork against the Falcons Monday night.

His second pass of the game he threw off his back foot, and it almost got picked off. He threw off his back foot at least three times against the Falcons, and he attempted just 21 passes.

Kaepernick has a tendency to throw off his back foot on short throws, and to over-stride on long throws. Quarterbacks can't stride 6 or 7 feet like Tim Lincecum, because quarterbacks don't have a mound. When Kaepernick over-strides, he looks like he's reverting to his pitching mechanics – he played baseball in high school, and the Cubs drafted him to be a pitcher.

He over-strode twice against the Falcons. The first time was a deep pass to Michael Crabtree, who was running a corner route on the right side of the field. The ball was snapped from the left hash. It was a long throw. Kaepernick dropped back, the pocket was perfect, Crabtree was open, Kaepernick set and strode but strode too far and the pass flew over Crabtree's head.

Later, Kaepernick threw another deep pass to Crabtree, this one over the middle. Again, Kaepernick was overzealous, he over-strode and threw the pass high and behind Crabtree, who jumped and twisted and made an acrobatic catch.

Sometimes, Kaepernick doesn't even bother to point his feet toward his target. On one short pass to rookie tight end Vance McDonald, Kaeperinck's feet were parallel to the line of scrimmage when he released the ball. The pass was low and McDonald dropped it.

Kaepernick's best pass against the Falcons may have been his worst play. It was a great pass because he reset his feet in the pocket and didn't over-stride and, as a result, threw a strike to Anquan Boldin between two defenders. The problem was Kaepernick stared at Boldin the entire play and never saw Crabtree, who was wide open deep behind Boldin.

If you have access to the coaches' film, you'll see a shot from right behind Kaepernick on that play. You'll see him lock his head onto Boldin. Kaepernick never scans the field. There is no progression, no reads. Just hoping and choking the football. And cheering the wide receiver, "Please get open. I'm waiting for you to get open."

I'm leaving you with one more image, but I won't interpret it.

Hours before a game, quarterbacks warm up on the field in shorts and T-shirts. Every quarterback warms up his arm and his legs.

Before throwing, Drew Brees spends 20 minutes working on his footwork in an imaginary pocket. He sets his feet and resets them and resets them over and over again quickly, going through imaginary progressions, avoiding imaginary pass rushers, always re-calibrating his feet, making sure they're in perfect position.

Kaepernick does wind sprints.
[ Edited by Wisconsin49erfan on Dec 29, 2013 at 8:07 AM ]
Originally posted by 49erphan:
Thanks to everyone who posted explanations of what happened on this play. The animated gif showed something that I couldn't tell from the broadcast - where did Falcon number 25 come from in this play? I saw a Falcon cornerback (number 23, I think) leave the area because he was covering Boldin. It looks like Falcon number 25 was covering Vernon Davis until he realized that Davis was blocking and then he picked up Kap running with the ball.

In my memory, it seemed like Kap had only picked up a few yards rather than nine yards. Whew, the big strides fool you sometimes into thinking he's not moving as fast as he really is. The Falcon safety did a nice job of closing on Kap.

25 was a safety, I think Kap would have scored if Vernon continued to that safety, instead of waiting for the LB to scrape out to him. IMO, Kap was outrunning 50, and got down because the safety showed up in front of him.
Jesus, most of us purposely avoid those b******t Cohn brain farts but we can't because the entire article gets posted in the thread

He spews a lot of b******t. He doesn't know s**t about footwork for a QB in the NFL. Who the f**k is he? I'm sure Harbs and co. see all the film and address everything that's necessary. They know more than Cohn