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Analysis from the Tampa Bay coaches film

Originally posted by 808niner4lyphe:
Can you guys please explain why the hell did we sucked sooo bad on defense lastweek when Tampa Bay went with the Hurry-up no huddle offense? Was it coverage breakdown? Or were the CBs playing too soft and giving too much cushion or what? The two series the Buccs went on hurry-up offense, they scored easily, I mean it was like a walk in the park. I was surprised they didn't do it more often. That was definitely our weakness on lastweek's game. Hopefully the team adjust to it.
I covered the 1st drive earlier in the thread. Basically, Tampa finally started executing against a couple of our coverages and we had 3 really good players make some bonehead moves on 3 of those plays, a bad penalty call, then Glennon made one heck of a throw on the TD.

One the 2nd TD drive, it was kind of more of the same from the 1st. All correctable things.
I'm very interested to see how this offense plays out. It seems that this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what Roman would eventually like the offense to become. If you look at Vance Mcdonald at Rice, he did the same type of stuff that LMJ did on that Boldin run near the goal line, line up and sweep into the backfield. There might be a couple things you could do out of that formation, Kaep could roll out and hit Crabtree on a post, or follow LMJ on a designed run. The only thing i dont understand is why Boldin? This seems like a good play to isolate a safety on a bigger back. I think Dixon could be ideal for this role if we run this play again.
Originally posted by brodiebluebanaszak:
I am not so enamored with this play in the red zone. It's essentially a slow developing play in the backfield. Using a ball carrier who is not used to facing 280lb defensive tackles. Risky. The fake to James is the wrong kind of fake, in my opinion. The fake is a run. So, it's not a fake. The real play is a run. He fakes to the misdirected side of the field, but his action may keep defenders at the real point of attack hovering at the line, instead of dropping back. wouldn't you say Johnny? Would a qb drop or quick pump get players off the line better? not sure. Also, this play seems like its not overly practiced by us. In critical red zone situations, does it help to run plays that we have practiced frequently? I think this is the kind of gadgetry that we have seen often before, instead of say a tight end delay or swing pass to frank on a vacated side of the field. It's a little mystifying honestly.

The one bright spot was vernons block on 54. That was pro.

Essentially, you saw the same things I did on my previous post but I like your comment even more about the fake handoff...and you have very valid questions:

This is why I prefer gif's to screen shots (although helpful in their own right). When I first watched the play live I thought the play had a chance but felt it probably only would have picked up a few yards b/c of the congestion inside. You can see here the S #37 probably would have closed that gap and filled that hole rather easily with additional help coming from the back side. The play broke down b/c of Snyder naturally but that's the "execution" we're always hearing about. One break down and the entire play blows up.

But, IMHO, I'm OK with the "idea" of the play but the personnel choices and the design is flawed. If HaRoMan wanted this play to work, you don't run any of the top 3 AR's anywhere near the play itself b/c it draws the defenders right into the heart of the play. For one, he's got Boldin in the Q formation with James. Both would be red flags b/c we never use James and if Boldin is in the backfield, something is up (from the D's perspective). Next, he's also got VD on the LOS (there's your other AR who you need to hone in on in the RZ). Those two personnel choices alone are drawing the entire defense to the box. He only has Crabtree split out wide who is only going to decoy out 1 DB (Roman may have been hoping he'd also occupy the S, to be fair).

Probably the best way to win this play on both personnel and design is the following: Huner and James from the Q formation. McDonald at the LOS instead of VD and split out WIDE right any comination 2 of the 3: Crabtree, Boldin and/or VD. The 2 WR's out wide will force the defense to occupy with 3 DB's and McDonald at the LOS will not garner the attention VD would inside (but he's just as effective blocking) and then you run a shiftier RB through that hole and beat the pursuit to the EZ. So good idea Roman but poor personnel choices and your design is slightly off IMO. And naturally, it helps if everyone does their part properly (execution). And props for not running this play inside your own 10.
Originally posted by ninerhippy:
I'm very interested to see how this offense plays out. It seems that this is only the tip of the iceberg when it comes to what Roman would eventually like the offense to become. If you look at Vance Mcdonald at Rice, he did the same type of stuff that LMJ did on that Boldin run near the goal line, line up and sweep into the backfield. There might be a couple things you could do out of that formation, Kaep could roll out and hit Crabtree on a post, or follow LMJ on a designed run. The only thing i dont understand is why Boldin? This seems like a good play to isolate a safety on a bigger back. I think Dixon could be ideal for this role if we run this play again.

Agreed, with the following skill personnel, there are endless possibilities: Miller (ouch), Boobie, Gore, James, Hunter, McDonald, VD, Crabtree, Boldin, Maningham, Patton and CK (arms, legs, IQ).

Endless!
Originally posted by LBSI9ers:
Originally posted by JoseCortez:
Originally posted by ChazBoner:
Originally posted by xela510:
Can you do an analysis on this play?
http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-game-highlights/0ap2000000298154/Anquan-Boldin-one-handed-grab

Analysis: BEAST!

boldin beast. kaep missed a WIDE open Crabtree. instead of tossing the football at the defense, Crabtree should have threw it at kaepernicks face.


Yea it's amazing that Crabtree has never dropped a pass ever in his career. Truly amazing.

That is not the point. The point is that Kaepernick throws in to double/triple coverage low to the back of a receiver that has to make a circus catch. When right in front of his face he has a premier wide out open with no one within 10-15 yards. that is the kind of thing that still makes people shake their head about Kaep. That was a BAD read, and a pro QB should never have made that throw to Boldin over Crabtree. It was a crossing route right in his sight line. If there were other situations like this during the game, no wonder why Crabtree was frustrated.
Originally posted by Bluesbro:
Originally posted by LBSI9ers:
Originally posted by JoseCortez:
Originally posted by ChazBoner:
Originally posted by xela510:
Can you do an analysis on this play?
http://www.nfl.com/videos/nfl-game-highlights/0ap2000000298154/Anquan-Boldin-one-handed-grab

Analysis: BEAST!

boldin beast. kaep missed a WIDE open Crabtree. instead of tossing the football at the defense, Crabtree should have threw it at kaepernicks face.


Yea it's amazing that Crabtree has never dropped a pass ever in his career. Truly amazing.

That is not the point. The point is that Kaepernick throws in to double/triple coverage low to the back of a receiver that has to make a circus catch. When right in front of his face he has a premier wide out open with no one within 10-15 yards. that is the kind of thing that still makes people shake their head about Kaep. That was a BAD read, and a pro QB should never have made that throw to Boldin over Crabtree. It was a crossing route right in his sight line. If there were other situations like this during the game, no wonder why Crabtree was frustrated.

Agreed...BUT, you have to consider the play call itself and it's design as well. I agree with thl408 that this play SHOULD HAVE been a pro-style passing play and it's on CK's shoulders to find the best option here (more evidence is Crabtree's emotional response to the pass not going his way). But we can't 100% dismiss the play call and design...perhaps it was a bunch formation designed to have Crabtree rub off Boldin's DB's for a big gain...that it was Boldin all the way so CK pulled the trigger. I highlighted our AR passing game as a reason why we have seen CK throw into double and even triple coverage for this very reason...he is merely trying to execute the play call, in theory, based on HaRoMan's play design the play THEY called into the huddle. Dilfer backed this up recently with comments as well...and here is more from Michael Silver:

Great NFL coaches find a way to adapt to the strengths of their best players. From implementing a few familiar concepts from a college playbook, to tweaking the game plan to make it simple for the signal-caller, a wily offensive coordinator will find a way to put his best player in a position to succeed. After watching their young passer struggle with a few intricate passing concepts, the 49ers have utilized a series of play-action and movement-based routes from run-heavy formations to help Kaepernick regain his rhythm in the pocket.

Now, I'm not suggesting Kaepernick was incapable of executing full field reads earlier in the season, but I do believe he struggled getting the ball to his secondary receiver on some routes.

http://www.nfl.com/news/story/0ap2000000301080/article/frank-gore-michael-crabtree-reviving-49ers-offense

Point? We need to consider all of the factors (as best we can) and the big picture before we jump to the conclusions that this was all on CK's shoulders. It very well may have ridden on the shoulders of the play call and design itself and coaching CK to simply "execute the play." If he is doing exactly what he's been coached to do (all year), to the coaches, he is doing his job well and they've recently come out and said they didn't understand all the criticism of him and that two games ago, may have been his most well-rounded executed game yet. To us as fans, it wasn't that big of a deal when you look at the stats esp. compared to some of his other more, electric games.

Often times as fans, we get caught up in what we SHOULD have done in a situation and miss the concept of the original design.
[ Edited by NCommand on Dec 21, 2013 at 7:56 AM ]
Originally posted by GORO:
Originally posted by thl408:
I hated this play call when I watched it live, but after watching this Snyder killed it. Good call by Roman

I saw the blown block, but still did not like the call live, thought it was too fancy. Seeing this I love the call, it's simple in it's requirements for execution, VD absolutely destroys his guy and I'll take Beast Boldin with a head of steam and a good angle on that little dude all. day. long.
[ Edited by Igotta on Dec 21, 2013 at 8:45 AM ]
Originally posted by Igotta:
Originally posted by GORO:
Originally posted by thl408:
I hated this play call when I watched it live, but after watching this Snyder killed it. Good call by Roman

I saw the blown block, but still did not like the call live, thought it was too fancy. Seeing this I love the call, it's simple in it's requirements for execution, VD absolutely destroys his guy and I'll take Beast Boldin with a head of steam and a good angle on that little dude all. day. long.

I think that play needs to be quicker hitting. The fake to James made it take longer for Boldin to get it. Snyder initially had his man cut upfield to create a gap but he was able to recover due to the handoff taking longer.
Snyder never had him. One of the most half assed blocks I've ever seen.
Originally posted by jonesadrian:
Originally posted by jonnydel:




The RB tries to shake Smith to the outside now that Smith has taken an inside move, but, Aldon did a fabulous job of squaring up once he got in the backfield and tackles the RB for a 2 yard loss.

This is really exciting play from a guy who's supposed to be a pass rush specialist. Only when it's slowed down can you truly appreciate the speed and ferocity that Smith uses in this play. The RB literally took three steps from the start of the play and Smith had diagnosed the play, beat a great LT, and was in position to make a tackle. Awesome, awesome play!
Criminally underrated aspect of his game. He's a real OLB.
he's STILL not even as good as he's going to be

just think about that for a minute

Yes, and now that he is sober (? I hope) his maturity will increase at a rapid pace. His size, speed and strength make him an absolute monster to block. I am still just dazzled by the 9ers LBs! Aldon, Willis, Bowman and Brooks are just...unfair!
Originally posted by verb1der:
Woo hoo, Greg Roman doesn't suck after all!


LOL whatever the guy gets us within 5 yards of o SB win and he sucks. Whatever.
NCommand, regarding post #291. This was too glaring of a misread, and I disagree with the play design argument. Crabtree was in the pattern, a viable receiver in Kaep's view, with no one wearing pewter pants the same area code. It would be one thing if Boldin was single covered ... that is always a good thing to try. But he was doubled with a player underneath. This was a bad choice.

Originally posted by Bluesbro:
NCommand, regarding post #291. This was too glaring of a misread, and I disagree with the play design argument. Crabtree was in the pattern, a viable receiver in Kaep's view, with no one wearing pewter pants the same area code. It would be one thing if Boldin was single covered ... that is always a good thing to try. But he was doubled with a player underneath. This was a bad choice.


Receivers are missed all the time...by Brady, P Manning, Brees...and Kaepernick. Pointing out one play seems very non-productive. I am more interested in Crabtree's reaction. Is he now going to sulk because he isn't the primary receiver on every play as he was last season? CK locked onto him and that's one reason the 9ers lost the Super Bowl. It's not all on CK but the lack of viable options other than VD and Crabtree in that game. Crabtree has to accept Boldin, VD and others sharing the ball this year, which means fewer targets for him. If he wants more targets he will have to go to another team, using a passing offense...would be ironic if he chose KC when his contract is up. LOL!
Originally posted by Bluesbro:
NCommand, regarding post #291. This was too glaring of a misread, and I disagree with the play design argument. Crabtree was in the pattern, a viable receiver in Kaep's view, with no one wearing pewter pants the same area code. It would be one thing if Boldin was single covered ... that is always a good thing to try. But he was doubled with a player underneath. This was a bad choice.


In principal, I agree 100%. But to make that claim, we are making 2 large assumptions 1) Crabtree was a viable option in the original play design and 2) CK flat out missed him despite being in his very sightlight.

The former "may" explain the latter.

And like dtg noted, open, viable receivers ARE missed all the time. The point here is that we need to consider ALL factors before we jump to conclusions that this was all on CK. That's all.
Someone had asked earlier about any evidence of the seahawks holding down the field. I've been scouting the Falcons, almost done btw, but, yeah they hold..... Here's a good example I saw(just one of MANY)



I just post this to show where the LOS is.



I've highlighted the LOS(purple) with the 5 yard maker being the point where contact with the receiver is no longer legal. The NFL allows full contact up to 5 yards from the LOS. You'll see how the only 2 receivers past the line are being held/a lot of contact from the Seahawks.



Further in on the play, you see their still doing it.....