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Is It Time To Identify A Franchise WR ?

  • buck
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 9,860
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
Originally posted by buck:
From 2007, the year Calvin Johnson was drafted, to the present 318 wide receivers have attended the combine. (limited to those whose heights were listed)

Of those, 57 were 6 feet 3inchers or taller (17.92 %).

The other 261 were less than 6 feet 3 inches (82.08%).

Yeah, I agree it doesn't matter if the guy is 5'10 or 6'4" but it does matter if he can get open and catch passes. Just was surprised by the top fifteen guys in yards last year...most over 6'2". Would I not want Steve Smith at 5'9"? I'd take (a young) someone like him in a heartbeat!

Being tall or being fast may help a good receiver, but height and speed do not make a receiver good.

I have the list of those 57 wide receivers 6 feet 3 and taller. Some of them are great; others are not.

I have no problem with size, or the lack of it for that matter. Quality is critical, not height, weight or speed.
[ Edited by buck on May 31, 2013 at 8:30 PM ]
Originally posted by buck:
Originally posted by dtg_9er:
Originally posted by buck:
From 2007, the year Calvin Johnson was drafted, to the present 318 wide receivers have attended the combine. (limited to those whose heights were listed)

Of those, 57 were 6 feet 3inchers or taller (17.92 %).

The other 261 were less than 6 feet 3 inches (82.08%).

Yeah, I agree it doesn't matter if the guy is 5'10 or 6'4" but it does matter if he can get open and catch passes. Just was surprised by the top fifteen guys in yards last year...most over 6'2". Would I not want Steve Smith at 5'9"? I'd take (a young) someone like him in a heartbeat!

Being tall or being fast may help a good receiver, but height and speed do not make a receiver good.

I have the list of those 57 wide receivers 6 feet 3 and taller. Some of them are great; others are not.

I have no problem with size, or the lack of it for that matter. Quality is critical, not height, weight or speed.

Absolutely agree. Think about the receivers that have emerged lately... it seems for every 1 Brandon Marshall, there are 5 Pierre Garcons/Victor Cruz/ Wallaces.

I used Brandon Marshall cause he is an example of a WR that wasnt a "sure thing" coming out of college. Everyone knew guys like Calvin Johnson, AJ Green or Andre Johnson were special coming out. But we are never gonna draft that high to get one of those specimens anyways. ;) So when you start looking in the 2-4 round area for a wide receiver, there are many more success stories of guys in the 5'10-6'2 range compared to those over 6'3. Calvin Johnson type athletes are extremely rare.
To the OP...

If you can name me a "Franchise WR", in the last 10-15 years, who has been the reason his team has won a SB or multiple SBs...then I will agree that this is a priority. Until then...all you are doing is trying to have your own version of someone else's player instead of focusing on your own philosophy as a team and holding true to the system in place.

Just because Julio Jones is 6'3" and CJ is 6'5" and can do it all doesn't mean we need a guy like that...last time I checked the Falcons lost that game and Detroit didn't even make the playoffs.

We are so strong everywhere else that an above all else option at WR is not really necessary. The team is about 5-7 deep at RB and WR...that in itself is enough to make up for one guy who has all the measureables but doesn't take his team to the dance.
Originally posted by reasonable1:
To the OP...

If you can name me a "Franchise WR", in the last 10-15 years, who has been the reason his team has won a SB or multiple SBs...then I will agree that this is a priority. Until then...all you are doing is trying to have your own version of someone else's player instead of focusing on your own philosophy as a team and holding true to the system in place.

Just because Julio Jones is 6'3" and CJ is 6'5" and can do it all doesn't mean we need a guy like that...last time I checked the Falcons lost that game and Detroit didn't even make the playoffs.

We are so strong everywhere else that an above all else option at WR is not really necessary. The team is about 5-7 deep at RB and WR...that in itself is enough to make up for one guy who has all the measureables but doesn't take his team to the dance.



Well put..
Originally posted by reasonable1:
To the OP...

If you can name me a "Franchise WR", in the last 10-15 years, who has been the reason his team has won a SB or multiple SBs...then I will agree that this is a priority. Until then...all you are doing is trying to have your own version of someone else's player instead of focusing on your own philosophy as a team and holding true to the system in place.

Just because Julio Jones is 6'3" and CJ is 6'5" and can do it all doesn't mean we need a guy like that...last time I checked the Falcons lost that game and Detroit didn't even make the playoffs.

We are so strong everywhere else that an above all else option at WR is not really necessary. The team is about 5-7 deep at RB and WR...that in itself is enough to make up for one guy who has all the measureables but doesn't take his team to the dance.


Yup. And it's not like there is this warehouse full of stud WR's waiting to be our franchise WR. The starting of this thread makes it sound like drafting, developing, etc of players is like buying a new car and that we should just head down to the dealership and pick up a new one/ and when we do, make sure it's the best on eon the lot. But I agree, as much as I'd like to see Megatron on this team (wouldn't every team?) or another top tier WR, to go get someone else's would do more harm than good.There are multiple positions that are far more important. Last thing I want is the team to have a weakspot at one of these positions just to have a top tier WR.
Madden Perception Disorder Syndrome (MPDS): the feeling that you can have a Megatron AND a Crabtree, an all-pro offensive line, an elite franchise QB, a studly corp of running backs and one of the best defenses in the league and do it all while staying under the salary cap.
  • cciowa
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 24,842
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Madden Perception Disorder Syndrome (MPDS): the feeling that you can have a Megatron AND a Crabtree, an all-pro offensive line, an elite franchise QB, a studly corp of running backs and one of the best defenses in the league and do it all while staying under the salary cap.

and you think you can trade players for other players like they are xmas candy
Originally posted by cciowa:
and you think you can trade players for other players like they are xmas candy

Exactly. I'll give you K Williams, Mario Manningham and Anthony Dixon for Julio Jones.... Done! Genius!
  • cciowa
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 24,842
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Originally posted by cciowa:
and you think you can trade players for other players like they are xmas candy

Exactly. I'll give you K Williams, Mario Manningham and Anthony Dixon for Julio Jones.... Done! Genius!

HA, that is some good stuff,,, sad to say,, many people think they can actually make that trade in real life I was always a mattel talking football fan myself , old school 1975
Our offense will spread the wealth this year , with a nice selection of weapons at our disposal , the opponents defense wont be able to key on one specific player ..were gonna light it up this year
Originally posted by NeeJ49er:
Our offense will spread the wealth this year , with a nice selection of weapons at our disposal , the opponents defense wont be able to key on one specific player ..were gonna light it up this year

If the first OTA's are any indication, defenses might have to pay special attention to Anquan Boldin, but they always do anyway. I think you're right. I think Kaepernick will have better chemistry with Davis this year and I think that at least one of the three young guys, Jenkins, Patton or Lockette, will be a factor. In addition, you've got K Williams and Manningham coming back and a full off season to integrate LaMichael James with some screens and hitches. Plus, Kaepernick gets an entire off season - he won't be concentrating on any one receiver for the sake of comfort.
  • cciowa
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 24,842
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Originally posted by NeeJ49er:
Our offense will spread the wealth this year , with a nice selection of weapons at our disposal , the opponents defense wont be able to key on one specific player ..were gonna light it up this year

If the first OTA's are any indication, defenses might have to pay special attention to Anquan Boldin, but they always do anyway. I think you're right. I think Kaepernick will have better chemistry with Davis this year and I think that at least one of the three young guys, Jenkins, Patton or Lockette, will be a factor. In addition, you've got K Williams and Manningham coming back and a full off season to integrate LaMichael James with some screens and hitches. Plus, Kaepernick gets an entire off season - he won't be concentrating on any one receiver for the sake of comfort.
I know you guys think I am nuts but I think the kid we signed from miami could be a player for us at wide out and special teams. great speed
Originally posted by cciowa:
I know you guys think I am nuts but I think the kid we signed from miami could be a player for us at wide out and special teams. great speed

What's his name? Something like Marlon Moore? Yeah, I always forget about him, but I don't doubt the talent of the Niner front office. Now is the time for cautious optimism. Let's hope for the best.
Originally posted by buck:
Being tall or being fast may help a good receiver, but height and speed do not make a receiver good.

I have the list of those 57 wide receivers 6 feet 3 and taller. Some of them are great; others are not.

I have no problem with size, or the lack of it for that matter. Quality is critical, not height, weight or speed.

Which is why I sometimes have to leave the WR threads in NT the week leading up to the draft. Too many folks looking at combine numbers and not college productivity. It is so rare for a non-productive college player to become a star in the NFL, no matter what his measurables.