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Solution(s) to losing Crabs

  • Andra
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 121
Perfect solution to losing craps . Shave your pubs
Member Milestone: This is post number 2,000 for mebemused.
Originally posted by Wodwo:
1) The egg came first. Two things that were not chickens f**ked and laid a chicken egg.

2) You forgot coaching as an option.

Crabtree went from "good" with Alex Smith to "great" with Kaepernick. Vernon Davis went from "very good" with Alex Smith to "afterthought" with Kaepernick (until the playoffs). I don't understand why people praise Kaepernick for elevating Crabtree's game, but don't blame him for Davis' lack of production.

I think all options (QB, WR, coaching) are factors and each can help compensate for the others. However, I think that of the three, WR is least likely to be the determining factor in a winning formula. There are just too many examples of great QBs having success regardless of who is playing WR. There also seem to be many examples of great WRs continually producing, but failing to help win games or elevate the play of the QB. Calvin Johnson and Matt Stafford are the best example of this, IMO. Record breaking receiving numbers, but only 4 wins and Stafford didn't even complete 60% of his passes. The other extreme is Larry Fitzgerald... the Cardinal's QB play was so inept that Larry Fitzgerald had the worst season of his career.

No, I didn't forget coaching as an option. For the purpose of my argument, I focused on QBs vs WRs, because eonblue finds all our current receivers unreliable, hence wants to sign a veteran inorder to get Justin Smith his SB ring. (I hope he gets a ring this year too!)

And thank you for adding Larry Fitzgeralds's abysmal last season without an adequate QB as yet another example of how QBs are more important that Wrs.

Now, if you want to add coaching into the equation, than I totally agree with you that developing schemes that showcase player strengths is what makes the difference with evenly talented rosters, (the upcoming Seahawk vs 49er games should be a coaching showcase.)

I think replacing Crabs will be a showcase for the 49er coaching staff, given the lack of production from all the remaining receivers, including rookies, that eonblue so ably pointed out. Trading for Bolden, Crab's replacement, is already paying off big time. For the rest, the coaching staff will have to compensate by isolating non-productive, (up to this point) players, one-on-one, through play calling. Let's get LMJ more touches on passing plays! And Kaep will have to learn to distribute the ball. That is what training camp is for.

Thanks for adding the coaching staff to the equation. Especially with training camp still to come.
Originally posted by mebemused:
No, I didn't forget coaching as an option. For the purpose of my argument, I focused on QBs vs WRs, because eonblue finds all our current receivers unreliable, hence wants to sign a veteran inorder to get Justin Smith his SB ring. (I hope he gets a ring this year too!)

And thank you for adding Larry Fitzgeralds's abysmal last season without an adequate QB as yet another example of how QBs are more important that Wrs.

Now, if you want to add coaching into the equation, than I totally agree with you that developing schemes that showcase player strengths is what makes the difference with evenly talented rosters, (the upcoming Seahawk vs 49er games should be a coaching showcase.)

I think replacing Crabs will be a showcase for the 49er coaching staff, given the lack of production from all the remaining receivers, including rookies, that eonblue so ably pointed out. Trading for Bolden, Crab's replacement, is already paying off big time. For the rest, the coaching staff will have to compensate by isolating non-productive, (up to this point) players, one-on-one, through play calling. Let's get LMJ more touches on passing plays! And Kaep will have to learn to distribute the ball. That is what training camp is for.

Thanks for adding the coaching staff to the equation. Especially with training camp still to come.

I don't want to sign a vet because I think it means when win the SB. I think it's smart and if you calculate the production of the WR on the roster it seems like an obvious move. I think your putting alot of pressure on rookies and a QB that hasn't even started a full season. With that being said he has camps and preseason to develop chemistry so maybe it doesn't matter. If AJ Jenkins was any inclination of this showcasing you speak of I don't feel very confidant. I hope your right tho. You probably are. I bet the coaching staff is working non stop training Kaep to run the offense. I think it would run better with another vet though.
my solution to losing crabs is to drink heavily.
Kaepernick relied on Crabtree too much last year. I understand that may have been necessary given the loss of Manningham and Williams, but it became one of the reasons the 9ers lost the Super Bowl. At the goal line Crabtree was taken away and CK had trouble...tried to fit it in anyway...when a more experienced QB may have been able to find an open VD, or young WR. Doesn't bother me because no other QB I know of would have made some of the runs Kaepernick made, just part of the deal when you have a young QB. But the close relationship CK built with MC may have been part of the problem--too much reliance on him or giving him the targets he wants is a slippery slope for any QB/WR relationship...can be detrimental to other relationships.

This is why I have said the loss of Crabtree may be a blessing in disguise. It may force CK to build a rapport with others and when Crabtree comes back he will need to fit into the mix. He may still be "The guy" for CK but Boldin, Jenkins, and others may make it necessary to spread the ball more.
I want to examine the whole notion of Kaepernick "relying too much on Crabtree" or Kaepernick being "forced to use someone other than Crabtree" as having legitimacy.

To begin with, we have to agree with the underlying assumption that Kaeperpick is intrinsically a FOOTBALL PLAYER. As opposed to a guy whose "playing" football. He's fearless on the field. I don't mean that in the heroic sense, but rather to say that he's a gamer, he's highly instinctive and not prone to being reduced to fear or "freezing up" when things don't play out the way they are drawn up on the blackboard. It's a sandlot player mentality, an attitude that Walsh termed "athletic instincts". Something he deemed essential to play QB at the highest level. Montana had that in spades.

Not all QBs have that. You can be great in the classroom and practice field and be serviceable, but unless you have that "instinct" you're not going to consistently "carry" the team when the chips are down. Kaepernick has that "instinct" and I believe that in his short tenure as the starter he has demonstrated that. If you don't agree with this assessment, then there's not point in reading further.

I don't think that Kaepernick has any problems with going through a progression of "reads". We've seen him do it; go through a four step progression, for instance (not necessarily a good thing). The implication of saying that Kaeprnick "relies too much" or "now he'll have to look to other receivers" is that Kaepernick ignores or abandons his reads and just focuses on Crabtree. These are throw away criticisms that ignore the reality of what is happening on the field.

Two thing happen when a QB drops back to throw:
1. He has time to go through his progressions in the pocket, or
2. He doesn't have time to go through his progressions.

1. If he has time, he goes through his reads and throws to the first "open" guy. This includes "throwing a receiver open", which "instinctive" receivers will do all the time, but is more difficult for others who will often want to see that the receiver is open before throwing the ball. It's important to note that the QB doesn't necessarily go through all the reads before throwing. If his first read is "open" he throws the ball.

Kaepernick was often asked: "Why do you thow to Crabtree so much?". His response: "Because he's open". Not: "Because I like throwing to him"; which is what those of you criticizing him are saying. What's he supposed to do? Not throw to his first open read just to satisfy the critics (who'll always have something to criticize anyway)?

Has Kaepernick ever thrown to other receivers? Sure he has. When the reads warranted. With mixed results. Alligator arms Moss. Dropsies Delanie. Very small window Vernon. The Niners receiver options were severely depleted last year when Manningham and Williams (and Hunter) went out remember. Pretty much Crabtree was the only RELIABLE receiver.

All of this becomes: "he relies on Crabtree too much" or "he needs to learn how to find other receivers" (even if they are not, nor ever will be, open). Come on, guys!

2. If he doesn't have time to go thorugh his progression, he improvises. He either takes off and runs if there is an opportunity, or he makes the best of a bad situation, or he gets sacked. Sometimes you just cannot avoid the sack. IMO Kaepernick is very good at avoiding the sack, which means he resorts to the other two options. Usually with good results.

Kaepernick has been criticized for making that last throw in the SB. It's been said that he "forced" the throw, he should "have been able to find an open VD". Sure, it was a painful sequence to watch because the result was so undesirable, but you have to actually watch what happened before pointing the fingure. On that lst play (actually the last two plays) an unblocked pass rusher (who should have been pick up by the RB) came through unimpeded. THERE WAS NO TIME TO GO THROUGH THE READS. With an "experienced" QB that's a sack; when the QB looks disgusted and slams the ground with the football. Kaepernick went to his first read and threw him open. Remember, this is all happening in a split second. Bad decision? I don't think so. He went to his first read and most reliable receiver. I disagree that Crabtree was "taken away". He was subsequently HELD, otherwise he probably makes that catch. Had Kaepernick known that Crabtree would be held, he probably shortens the throw, but how was he to know that? A lot of bad things happened on that play. Uncalled penalties. And a few players fell down on the job. Unblocked rushers.

It's good for the QB to deveop a rapport will ALL of his receivers. But it takes two to tango. I'm sure Kaepernick threw to a lot of receivers in practice, trying to develop that rapport. But in game situations there was really only one who consistently came through, while others faltered. And in a crisis, who you gonna call? Some people make it sound like it's all Kaepernick's fault that all of his options are not showing up.

This season, hopefully, some othe WRs beside Boldin emerge. Otherwise it'll be: "Kaepernick relies on Boldin too much" . . . BTW didn't Flacco do that?
Kaepernick actually began finding Davis a lot more towards the end. Davis came in third among receivers for post season yardage and fourth in first downs. The only receivers who had more receiving yardage were Boldin and Crabtree. Davis and Boldin are both going to get a lot of catches this season.
This team has terrible luck with injuries to receivers. Kaep and the whole team were forced to go to Crabtree at the end of the year. He was the only legit receiver option left after Manningham and Williams got injured. Moss played the clear out role of Ginn like in the previous year. By the time they got to the SB, the Ravens knew too well who Kaep will go to when he needs 7 yds to the endzone.
I wonder if Osgood is being brought in to play WR.
[ Edited by eonblue on Jun 4, 2013 at 1:04 PM ]
Originally posted by Rsrkshn:
I want to examine the whole notion of Kaepernick "relying too much on Crabtree" or Kaepernick being "forced to use someone other than Crabtree" as having legitimacy.

To begin with, we have to agree with the underlying assumption that Kaeperpick is intrinsically a FOOTBALL PLAYER. As opposed to a guy whose "playing" football. He's fearless on the field. I don't mean that in the heroic sense, but rather to say that he's a gamer, he's highly instinctive and not prone to being reduced to fear or "freezing up" when things don't play out the way they are drawn up on the blackboard. It's a sandlot player mentality, an attitude that Walsh termed "athletic instincts". Something he deemed essential to play QB at the highest level. Montana had that in spades.

Not all QBs have that. You can be great in the classroom and practice field and be serviceable, but unless you have that "instinct" you're not going to consistently "carry" the team when the chips are down. Kaepernick has that "instinct" and I believe that in his short tenure as the starter he has demonstrated that. If you don't agree with this assessment, then there's not point in reading further.

I don't think that Kaepernick has any problems with going through a progression of "reads". We've seen him do it; go through a four step progression, for instance (not necessarily a good thing). The implication of saying that Kaeprnick "relies too much" or "now he'll have to look to other receivers" is that Kaepernick ignores or abandons his reads and just focuses on Crabtree. These are throw away criticisms that ignore the reality of what is happening on the field.

Two thing happen when a QB drops back to throw:
1. He has time to go through his progressions in the pocket, or
2. He doesn't have time to go through his progressions.

1. If he has time, he goes through his reads and throws to the first "open" guy. This includes "throwing a receiver open", which "instinctive" receivers will do all the time, but is more difficult for others who will often want to see that the receiver is open before throwing the ball. It's important to note that the QB doesn't necessarily go through all the reads before throwing. If his first read is "open" he throws the ball.

Kaepernick was often asked: "Why do you thow to Crabtree so much?". His response: "Because he's open". Not: "Because I like throwing to him"; which is what those of you criticizing him are saying. What's he supposed to do? Not throw to his first open read just to satisfy the critics (who'll always have something to criticize anyway)?

Has Kaepernick ever thrown to other receivers? Sure he has. When the reads warranted. With mixed results. Alligator arms Moss. Dropsies Delanie. Very small window Vernon. The Niners receiver options were severely depleted last year when Manningham and Williams (and Hunter) went out remember. Pretty much Crabtree was the only RELIABLE receiver.

All of this becomes: "he relies on Crabtree too much" or "he needs to learn how to find other receivers" (even if they are not, nor ever will be, open). Come on, guys!

2. If he doesn't have time to go thorugh his progression, he improvises. He either takes off and runs if there is an opportunity, or he makes the best of a bad situation, or he gets sacked. Sometimes you just cannot avoid the sack. IMO Kaepernick is very good at avoiding the sack, which means he resorts to the other two options. Usually with good results.

Kaepernick has been criticized for making that last throw in the SB. It's been said that he "forced" the throw, he should "have been able to find an open VD". Sure, it was a painful sequence to watch because the result was so undesirable, but you have to actually watch what happened before pointing the fingure. On that lst play (actually the last two plays) an unblocked pass rusher (who should have been pick up by the RB) came through unimpeded. THERE WAS NO TIME TO GO THROUGH THE READS. With an "experienced" QB that's a sack; when the QB looks disgusted and slams the ground with the football. Kaepernick went to his first read and threw him open. Remember, this is all happening in a split second. Bad decision? I don't think so. He went to his first read and most reliable receiver. I disagree that Crabtree was "taken away". He was subsequently HELD, otherwise he probably makes that catch. Had Kaepernick known that Crabtree would be held, he probably shortens the throw, but how was he to know that? A lot of bad things happened on that play. Uncalled penalties. And a few players fell down on the job. Unblocked rushers.

It's good for the QB to deveop a rapport will ALL of his receivers. But it takes two to tango. I'm sure Kaepernick threw to a lot of receivers in practice, trying to develop that rapport. But in game situations there was really only one who consistently came through, while others faltered. And in a crisis, who you gonna call? Some people make it sound like it's all Kaepernick's fault that all of his options are not showing up.

This season, hopefully, some othe WRs beside Boldin emerge. Otherwise it'll be: "Kaepernick relies on Boldin too much" . . . BTW didn't Flacco do that?

LOL, excellent post and perspective. I love this challenge. I'll even take it a step further...we have to go beyond CK and Crabtree and look at the TYPE of offense we ran from week 11 on. It was basically a college one-receiver-option offense. Naturally, our best WR was Crabtree so HE was often called in as the #1 option. This meant that upon the snap, all the other players on offense played a significant part in getting Crabtree the ball. First, Moss runs a deep post occupying two DB's. VD clears out a route underneath. Manningham runs a deeper route ahead of Crabtree and starts blocking out the DB while the ball is in the air. Crabtree catches it underneath open, gets his RAC and we move the chains on a 3rd down conversion. If Crabtree is covered, then it's a full ad lib by CK and the receivers and running backs...like CK rolling left in the Superbowl and hitting Gore over his shoulder streaking down the sideline. That's not to say CK himself isn't progression-reading (is another open instead?) but progressions don't seem to be built into this offense.

This is NOT a WCO offense. I've argued over and over that this is the Anti-WCO. A WCO is predicated upon a WR tree of options (usually deeper to shorter ranges) and if not available, the QB goes to the TE in the soft zone or finally, checks down to the FB/RB who flares out as an outlet. This is the Stanford or for history purposes, the Michigan Bo Schembechler offense. And that's not going to change. Roman just added more college formations and looks (e.g. the Q formation...aka the Pistol).

What IS going to change who will be that #1 read. Roman will trust Boldin so most likely, he'll be the heavy lifter now that Crabtree is out. He'll probably use Lockette or AJ Jenkins or even Marlon Moore (if he makes it) in the deep X decoy (aka the Moss-role), he'll continue to use Williams/Manningham/Patton in the Slot/Y and Boldin will stay at the Z and may slide inside to the Slot inside the red zone (or use McDonald). VD will still play the clearing-out role as he'll continue to command double-teams. The RB's will typically stay in to block unless CK is ad libbing.

So we'll see...I don't expect much different this year other than who the #1 target will be.
Originally posted by NCommand:
LOL, excellent post and perspective. I love this challenge. I'll even take it a step further...we have to go beyond CK and Crabtree and look at the TYPE of offense we ran from week 11 on. It was basically a college one-receiver-option offense. Naturally, our best WR was Crabtree so HE was often called in as the #1 option. This meant that upon the snap, all the other players on offense played a significant part in getting Crabtree the ball. First, Moss runs a deep post occupying two DB's. VD clears out a route underneath. Manningham runs a deeper route ahead of Crabtree and starts blocking out the DB while the ball is in the air. Crabtree catches it underneath open, gets his RAC and we move the chains on a 3rd down conversion. If Crabtree is covered, then it's a full ad lib by CK and the receivers and running backs...like CK rolling left in the Superbowl and hitting Gore over his shoulder streaking down the sideline. That's not to say CK himself isn't progression-reading (is another open instead?) but progressions don't seem to be built into this offense.

This is NOT a WCO offense. I've argued over and over that this is the Anti-WCO. A WCO is predicated upon a WR tree of options (usually deeper to shorter ranges) and if not available, the QB goes to the TE in the soft zone or finally, checks down to the FB/RB who flares out as an outlet. This is the Stanford or for history purposes, the Michigan Bo Schembechler offense. And that's not going to change. Roman just added more college formations and looks (e.g. the Q formation...aka the Pistol).

What IS going to change who will be that #1 read. Roman will trust Boldin so most likely, he'll be the heavy lifter now that Crabtree is out. He'll probably use Lockette or AJ Jenkins or even Marlon Moore (if he makes it) in the deep X decoy (aka the Moss-role), he'll continue to use Williams/Manningham/Patton in the Slot/Y and Boldin will stay at the Z and may slide inside to the Slot inside the red zone (or use McDonald). VD will still play the clearing-out role as he'll continue to command double-teams. The RB's will typically stay in to block unless CK is ad libbing.

So we'll see...I don't expect much different this year other than who the #1 target will be.


Hmmm . . . very interesting. So you're saying: One read, then "ad lib".
Though Boldin will not always be the first read, I take it? Otherwise the offense is too predictable and eliminates one option unnecessarily.
When Kaepernick goes into full "ad lib" is he expected to follow a progression or is it solely up to him?

The whole purpose of a game plan, I suppose, is to create mismatches, which implies a strategy of patterns run by potential receivers and a sequence of "reads", just so you're not wasting time trying to figure out what the heck just happened and what your options are. Or do you reckon that it's carte blanche on Kaepernick?
I recall a very deliberate Kaepernick in the Saints game going through a full scan of the field and reverting back to his first "read". Or so it seemed. Was he ad libing?

The picture you're painting is that so long as the first read is available, the long ball is never in play. Is that right?

It's going to be interesting, that's for sure.
Originally posted by Rsrkshn:


Kaepernick was often asked: "Why do you thow to Crabtree so much?". His response: "Because he's open". Not: "Because I like throwing to him"; which is what those of you criticizing him are saying. What's he supposed to do? Not throw to his first open read just to satisfy the critics (who'll always have something to criticize anyway)?

All of this becomes: "he relies on Crabtree too much" or "he needs to learn how to find other receivers" (even if they are not, nor ever will be, open). Come on, guys!


This season, hopefully, some othe WRs beside Boldin emerge. Otherwise it'll be: "Kaepernick relies on Boldin too much" . . . BTW didn't Flacco do that?

I'm shocked that Kaepernick would say that. LOL! Is he likely to point out, or even see, his faults?

If you are referring to my post, it is not that I diminish other variables in the receiver/QB relationship, or team dynamic, but that it is human nature to grab your security blanket when you are under pressure. Crabtree was by far the most dependable receiver last year and had a rapport with CK that was developed on and off the field...a great security blanket.

Would it have been smart to force the ball to another receiver just to prove you can? Probably not...when the next two guys up are on the injured list. My perception of QB/WR relationships over the years is that the QB, at some point, needs to tell the WR "Sorry, but I'm going to spread the ball around." I recall Walsh criticizing Rice when he made an on field gesture that indicated he was unhappy Montana did not throw him the ball more. Montana just ignored the complaint and kept throwing it to the TE and 2nd WR until Rice was wide open for a TD.

Do I think WR is an inherently selfish position? Yes, it tends to attract me first guys who need to be coached to accept the game plan as implemented. CK may already be able to tell Crabtree to lineup and shut up...but I doubt it. He will grow into that confidence and not having Crabtree may help push that growth. It is not a huge criticism of a second year QB! He is already one of the best in the NFL and will just get better. This is an area I expect growth...and Jenkins, Patton, Manningham, Williams, etc. better be ready to step up!
[ Edited by dtg_9er on Jun 4, 2013 at 5:44 PM ]
LOL, excellent post and perspective. I love this challenge. I'll even take it a step further...we have to go beyond CK and Crabtree and look at the TYPE of offense we ran from week 11 on. It was basically a college one-receiver-option offense. Naturally, our best WR was Crabtree so HE was often called in as the #1 option. This meant that upon the snap, all the other players on offense played a significant part in getting Crabtree the ball.

Simplifying the play for a rookie QB is exactly what a coaching staff should do to develop a QB. Another common practice is to call roll out plays that cut the field in half vertically, so the QB has less to think about before making his decision.

Hopefully for Kaep, with 11 games under his belt and a full training camp, Roman will call more plays that allow Kaep to diversify his targets.
Originally posted by Rsrkshn:
Hmmm . . . very interesting. So you're saying: One read, then "ad lib".
Though Boldin will not always be the first read, I take it? Otherwise the offense is too predictable and eliminates one option unnecessarily.
When Kaepernick goes into full "ad lib" is he expected to follow a progression or is it solely up to him?
I will be honest, I haven't fully been able to narrow the focus down on this offense...like Chucky said, "I don't know what the heck this offense is..." (close paraphrase). I "think" b/c our own coaches didn't even know what we had in CK (see Jed's comments recently), they simplified the offense...that said, even under Alex, I see more "college" offense then pro-style, multiple-read and outlet options (like a WCO). So IMHO, it's primarily a one-receiver-option offense...the play is designed to get one specific receiver the ball under 4 seconds.

Take that example I noted above (this is an actual play BTW), if Crabtree IS covered and can't get the ball under 4 seconds, he is then forced to ad lib himself...and watch CK. If CK starts to run, Crabtree becomes a downfield blocker. Meanwhile, if Crabtree doesn't get the pass, Manningham stops blocking is man and comes back to the QB as an outlet OR also blocks for CK. This is where you'll see Gore also take off while CK points to him while running left and tosses him a pass. The point here is that there isn't a receiving tree...a digit offense...etc. the majority of the time.

It's very hard to pin down this passing attack. Where I see more progression reading is actually in the end zone. I think that is where all receivers have to be receivers and not blockers or decoys for one specific receiver/target. Although, you can say that may not have been the case on the final four plays of the Superbowl.

So no, Boldin will not always be the first option (BTW: he is a hell of an ad libber)...it ALL comes down to what play call HaRoman send in. Granted, I would imagine Boldin will be the primary one-receiver-option most of the time his number won't be called every time to avoid predictability. One play his number will be called to run a post or a slant or an out...next play may be AJ on a crossing pattern or go, etc. Then VD is the primary and the others clear out and block for him, etc. Or Williams on a wheel route down the sideline.

As to your last question here, I'm unsure if this offense doesn't have a route tree or progressions and safety valves built in OR it does but b/c CK was so new, they kept it simple and eliminated those initially. And that with a full off season, we'll see additional trees added in? We also weren't the best pass blocking team at the time so there may have been added focus on getting the ball out under 4 seconds; so he may have been instructed to take off if he can't hit his first read...in essence, he'd run to where his receiver was covered (b/c we were clearing space out for him to get RAC) so once, say, Crabtree was covered, he'd turn into a blocker and CK would pick up huge chunks of yards d/t that cleared out space and good down field blocking by all.

The whole purpose of a game plan, I suppose, is to create mismatches, which implies a strategy of patterns run by potential receivers and a sequence of "reads", just so you're not wasting time trying to figure out what the heck just happened and what your options are. Or do you reckon that it's carte blanche on Kaepernick?
I recall a very deliberate Kaepernick in the Saints game going through a full scan of the field and reverting back to his first "read". Or so it seemed. Was he ad libing?

The picture you're painting is that so long as the first read is available, the long ball is never in play. Is that right?

It's going to be interesting, that's for sure.

I think I covered the first part above but I believe when Roman calls a play it is designed to attack a weakness on the defense...in short, HE has the control, more than the QB. In the WCO, Bill called the plays and reminded Joe "If this, then that..." but it was up to Joe to see the field and pick the best option knowing that ALL were true receiving options.

Good question about the long ball...we had, perhaps the best long ball WR in the game but rarely dialed up his number. We had Ginn, 4.2 speed, VD, etc. To me, it seems like the deep post was designed to occupy 2 defenders to help clear out space for the shorter/intermediate targets. Our wheel-route was our deep threat. This year? I'm not sure if Roman will dial that up much...if he does, perhaps he'll have a built in outlet if it's not open (RB or TE flare out), etc.
Originally posted by mebemused:
LOL, excellent post and perspective. I love this challenge. I'll even take it a step further...we have to go beyond CK and Crabtree and look at the TYPE of offense we ran from week 11 on. It was basically a college one-receiver-option offense. Naturally, our best WR was Crabtree so HE was often called in as the #1 option. This meant that upon the snap, all the other players on offense played a significant part in getting Crabtree the ball.

Simplifying the play for a rookie QB is exactly what a coaching staff should do to develop a QB. Another common practice is to call roll out plays that cut the field in half vertically, so the QB has less to think about before making his decision.

Hopefully for Kaep, with 11 games under his belt and a full training camp, Roman will call more plays that allow Kaep to diversify his targets.

Obviously I agree...see my post above. I'm still unsure if we don't have a receiver tree built into our offense (the anti-WCO) or if it will remain primarily a one-receiver-option (college) offense going forward. I would think Roman, like you noted, will open up the playbook more, and build in outlets for CK and the receivers...more diversity, more receiving options, more outlets, etc.