There are 206 users in the forums

Remember
Not a member? Register Now!

The Michael Crabtree Thread

Originally posted by ninermedic:
Originally posted by 49AllTheTime:
Originally posted by susweel:
crabs will probably be even slower when he comes back.

he will be Tom Brady slow

Running slower than Robocop smdh

Originally posted by RealShaloop:
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Look at that technology! Wow.

And, "Kobe has a superior wJimiork ethic"??? Please. No NBA player has a superior work ethic to any top-flight NFL player. You touch an NBA player while he's trying to make a shot and he starts crying. There is no NBA player that could last five minutes in an NFL game.

Doubt that. Jimmy Graham, Tony Gonzalez, Antonio Gates. While they weren't nba they were basketball players, and you can't say someone like lebron or andre igoduala wouldn't be able to crack someone or atleast take a hit.

I can see by some of the responses that this touches a nerve. It was a bit tongue-in-cheek with the touch them and crying bit, but there is an old argument that's been going on for years about this. The argument is who are generally better athletes? NBA players or NFL players? I've heard a lot of pros argue about this, but the most compelling is this one: which professional athletes have successfully made transitions to other pro games? First of all, Graham, Gonzalez and Gates simply don't count because they were college players and we all know that the jump between even division one and pro is a lot steeper than people think no matter what sport you're talking about. But as far as transitioning from pro to pro, you can find quite a few NFL players who were successful in the bigs at baseball - Bo Jackson, Dieon Sanders, that safety who played for Atlanta, I forget his name and a few others. But there is literally no example I know of where you can find an NBA player who has ever been able to successfully transfer to another pro sport. Hell, even golf. John Brodie had a successful career on the senior circuit for a few years. Where is the NBA player who can even play golf on a pro level. The greatest NBA player of all time (IMO) couldn't get out of the minors in baseball and couldn't scratch his way on to a pro tour in golf to save his life. Yes, NBA players are incredible athletes, but NFL players are just as incredible and take a huge beating while being incredible. And, their athleticism seems more general and not as specific as NBA guys as evidenced by the way they can play other sports.
Originally posted by kray28:
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Shoulda smartened you up a bit, NBA players are pansies

Because 82 games over 6+ months doesn't require toughness that 16 games over 4 months does.

Very few NFLers would have the talent to hack it in the NBA. It's a different level of elite athleticism.

If you put Kobe in at TE, he would kill the league. Think of Tony Gonzalez...only with the athleticism several orders of magnitude more imposing.

relax man, I was just jokin
Originally posted by GNielsen:
I can see by some of the responses that this touches a nerve. It was a bit tongue-in-cheek with the touch them and crying bit, but there is an old argument that's been going on for years about this. The argument is who are generally better athletes? NBA players or NFL players? I've heard a lot of pros argue about this, but the most compelling is this one: which professional athletes have successfully made transitions to other pro games? First of all, Graham, Gonzalez and Gates simply don't count because they were college players and we all know that the jump between even division one and pro is a lot steeper than people think no matter what sport you're talking about. But as far as transitioning from pro to pro, you can find quite a few NFL players who were successful in the bigs at baseball - Bo Jackson, Dieon Sanders, that safety who played for Atlanta, I forget his name and a few others. But there is literally no example I know of where you can find an NBA player who has ever been able to successfully transfer to another pro sport. Hell, even golf. John Brodie had a successful career on the senior circuit for a few years. Where is the NBA player who can even play golf on a pro level. The greatest NBA player of all time (IMO) couldn't get out of the minors in baseball and couldn't scratch his way on to a pro tour in golf to save his life. Yes, NBA players are incredible athletes, but NFL players are just as incredible and take a huge beating while being incredible. And, their athleticism seems more general and not as specific as NBA guys as evidenced by the way they can play other sports.

Brian Jordan is who you are thinking about. Better baseball player than safety.
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Originally posted by kray28:
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Shoulda smartened you up a bit, NBA players are pansies

Because 82 games over 6+ months doesn't require toughness that 16 games over 4 months does.

Very few NFLers would have the talent to hack it in the NBA. It's a different level of elite athleticism.

If you put Kobe in at TE, he would kill the league. Think of Tony Gonzalez...only with the athleticism several orders of magnitude more imposing.

relax man, I was just jokin

Right, it's all just conjecture, but I've seen NBA players just laugh at the idea that any of them could take the pounding an NFL player has to. I saw Charles Barkely just laugh it off one time on ESPN. He basically said, "do you think any of us could take that kind of punishment? We start complaining if someone slaps us while we're going to the basket." And this is just my opinion, but I don't think Kobe would last one quarter as a TE in an NFL game. All of the successful college round ball players had to do some heavy bulking up and conditioning to play in the NFL. Gonzolez has talked about that a lot. And, I think some of the posters around here need to get close to the field during a game and just listen to what's happening out there. I've been court-side at NBA games and I've been lucky enough to be on the sideline of a couple NFL games. OMG! There is simply no way to compare the two.
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Brian Jordan is who you are thinking about. Better baseball player than safety.

Exactly. Thank you. Now, can you think of any NBA who played baseball or any other pro sport. To be fair, it's often because their bodies are built specifically for basketball, but really. Jordan got close. At least he played in the minors, but he couldn't hit a curve and he wasn't really the best fielder either.
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Brian Jordan is who you are thinking about. Better baseball player than safety.

Exactly. Thank you. Now, can you think of any NBA who played baseball or any other pro sport. To be fair, it's often because their bodies are built specifically for basketball, but really. Jordan got close. At least he played in the minors, but he couldn't hit a curve and he wasn't really the best fielder either.

closest i can think of nate robinson being a college defensive back
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Right, it's all just conjecture, but I've seen NBA players just laugh at the idea that any of them could take the pounding an NFL player has to. I saw Charles Barkely just laugh it off one time on ESPN. He basically said, "do you think any of us could take that kind of punishment? We start complaining if someone slaps us while we're going to the basket." And this is just my opinion, but I don't think Kobe would last one quarter as a TE in an NFL game. All of the successful college round ball players had to do some heavy bulking up and conditioning to play in the NFL. Gonzolez has talked about that a lot. And, I think some of the posters around here need to get close to the field during a game and just listen to what's happening out there. I've been court-side at NBA games and I've been lucky enough to be on the sideline of a couple NFL games. OMG! There is simply no way to compare the two.

If your evidence is based on something Barkley said, that's basically a concession of your point. Barkley talks a lot, but ends up saying very little of consequence. He certainly doesn't speak for every basketball player.

Playing in the NBA is very lucrative...especially compared to the NFL. Few NBA players have an incentive to go to the NFL. It pays worse, the injury risk is higher, contracts aren't guaranteed, and careers can be short.

Beyond that, there is no doubt in my mind that more than a few NBA players could play in the NFL and be extremely successful.
Originally posted by GNielsen:
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Brian Jordan is who you are thinking about. Better baseball player than safety.

Exactly. Thank you. Now, can you think of any NBA who played baseball or any other pro sport. To be fair, it's often because their bodies are built specifically for basketball, but really. Jordan got close. At least he played in the minors, but he couldn't hit a curve and he wasn't really the best fielder either.

That doesn't mean that not a single person who chose to play in the nba couldn't have pursued a career in the nfl. And its ridiculous to think that no one in the nba right now could make the jump just because no one is trying it.
I don't expect Crabtree to be near 100% when he returns, but IF he is than everything changes. Our offense will be very loaded and Kaepernick would already have built a chemistry with some of the other guys.

When Crabtree and Manningham return, it will be interesting to see who gets wrong end of the stick. We can't cut Baldwin, can we? I think Moore would be a prime candidate to be let go of as we will go with Crabtree, Manningham, Boldin, Williams, Patton, and Baldwin. Next year our core will look something like this:

Crabtree
Baldwin
Williams
Patton
Rookie?
NBA players that played other sports (football players in bold):

  • Danny Ainge – NBA All-Star and two-time champion with the Boston Celtics, also played baseball for the Toronto Blue Jays.
  • Scott Burrell – the only athlete in history to have been drafted in the first round in two of the four major professional sports leagues (MLB and NBA)[36]
  • Wilt Chamberlain – Played volleyball in the IVA for the Seattle Smashers 1974–1979. Went to college on a track and basketball scholarship, was also offered professional boxing and football opportunities.
  • Nathaniel Clifton – played baseball in the Negro Leagues, before becoming the first African American to land a NBA contract.
  • Dave DeBusschere – Hall of Famer had a short professional baseball career (1962–1963) as a pitcher for the Chicago White Sox[37]
  • Tim Duncan – Was a competitive swimmer in the U.S. Virgin Islands; endeavored to make the 1992 Olympic Games before Hurricane Hugo took out his town's only Olympic size pool.
  • Keith Erickson – He attended UCLA on a shared baseball and basketball scholarship also played on the 1964 U.S. Men's Olympic Volleyball Team, then going to the NBA.
  • John Havlicek – Was in the Cleveland Browns' training camp in 1962.
  • Allen Iverson – Was an all-state quarterback in high school.[38]
  • LeBron James – was an all-state high school wide receiver, he also has bowling lanes in his house. He beat Chris Paul in the first Invitational bowling tournament in 2008.
  • Michael Jordan – briefly played as an outfielder in Class AA team for the Chicago White Sox after his first retirement from the NBA. Is also an avid golfer.
  • Greg Lee – also a pioneer in professional beach volleyball.
  • John Lucas – Also played on the Grand Prix tennis circuit and with World TeamTennis.
  • Mickey McCarty – In 1968, he was selected by the Kansas City Chiefs in the fourth round of the NFL-AFL draft, by the Chicago Bulls in the 14th round of the NBA draft, by the Dallas Chaparrals in the ABA draft and by the Cleveland Indians in the 25th round of the baseball draft.
  • Cotton Nash – Played in the MLB for the Chicago White Sox and the Minnesota Twins in 1967–1969.
  • Steve Nash - Played soccer and rugby union in high school as well as basketball.
  • Hakeem Olajuwon – played association football in Nigeria before moving to the United States to concentrate on his basketball career.[35]
  • Chris Paul - is a sponsored spokesperson for the United States Bowling Congress (USBC) as well as hosting PBA-sanctioned Celebrity Bowling Tournaments since 2008.[39]
  • Pat Riley – He was selected by the San Diego Rockets in the 1st round of the 1967 NBA Draft, and was also drafted as a wide receiver by the Dallas Cowboys in the 11th round of the 1967 NFL Draft.
  • Nate Robinson - Played football at the University of Washington. Robinson's college football career is most remembered for his interception in the final minutes of regulation of the 2002 Apple Cup against the Washington State Cougars, who were at the time ranked #3 in the AP poll
  • Cesare Rubini – Has been inducted to the Basketball Hall of Fame in 1994 and in the International Swimming Hall of Fame for his merit in water polo.
  • Bill Sharman – Was on the Brooklyn Dodgers farm system and was called up, but never played in the big leagues
  • Jay Triano – Former Toronto Raptors head coach, was drafted by the Los Angeles Lakers and the CFL's Calgary Stampeders in football.
  • Charlie Ward – Won the Heisman Trophy and also played tennis and baseball.[35]
  • Dean Brogan – Played Basketball in Australia for the Adelaide 36ers before changing and playing Australian Rules football for Port Power, winning a premiership in 2004.
  • Matt Barnes - played WR for UCLA, before going to the NBA and playing for numerous teams
Originally posted by mattster03:


That treadmill is pretty cool. From what I understand it's pressurized in that bubble and seal around his waist actually lifts him with the inflation and takes almost all weight of his lower body as he walks.

I thought it just prevented him from putting his hands on his hips.
Originally posted by kray28:
Originally posted by Memphis9er:
Shoulda smartened you up a bit, NBA players are pansies

Because 82 games over 6+ months doesn't require toughness that 16 games over 4 months does.

Very few NFLers would have the talent to hack it in the NBA. It's a different level of elite athleticism.

If you put Kobe in at TE, he would kill the league. Think of Tony Gonzalez...only with the athleticism several orders of magnitude more imposing.

Ok, what the hell does having bowling lanes at his house have to do with him being a two sport athlete (LeBron) LOL.
Kobe is an Eagles fan...there was actually some talk some while back of him playing TE for them. It wasn't serious, but Kobe is one of the NBA's toughest guys when it comes to playing with pain/injury. Many have speculated that he would have quite successful as an NFL TE or WR.

He's 6'6" and has varied his weight between 205 and 225....in NFL terms he's one of those big tall WRs that NFL teams love and he has elite WR speed....if you doubt this, you can watch how fast he is on the basketball court.