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LaMichael James was a Niner (CUT!)

  • Liono
  • Member
  • Posts: 601
Not much a back can do if he's met in the backfield. But LMJ runs more to the outside, which tend to be big gains or nothing.
I honestly thought the 49ers would be getting more out of this dude. He was amazing in College but that was against soft defenses turns out. Picking him at #61 overall looks like a silly move now. He coulda been had a round or 2 later. the 12' draft has to go down as an utter disaster.
Screen passes!!!!
Again, one of the major underlining factors here (constantly ignored) is the "Fall of the Roman." Aside from VD and now, finally, Gore, this OC has no clue how to use personnel in his college offense. The most creative thing he's done to help scheme proper personnel this year was calling a middle screen to Hunter (success) and using Williams on an actual end-around (success). Now, don't expect to see either play ever again.
[ Edited by NCommand on Oct 8, 2013 at 8:07 AM ]
It's not his fault he get used so little. He should be used like a Sproles type player...an extra slot receiver basically, on a team with a bunch of receivers that can't get open. You'd think they'd find a way to get a speedy back with good hands the ball in space?
Originally posted by NCommand:
Again, one of the major underlining factors here (constantly ignored) is the "Fall of the Roman." Aside from VD and now, finally, Gore, this OC has no clue how to use personnel in his college offense. The most creative thing he's done to help scheme proper personnel this year was calling a middle screen to Hunter (success) and using Williams on an actual end-around (success). Now, don't expect to see either play ever again.

Lol forreal. Roman's lack of screen passes is really infuriating. I feel like we're the only team in the NFL that doesn't call any.
Originally posted by matt49er:
Originally posted by LifelongNiner:
It would be interesting to note how many of his runs result in 2 yards or less versus Gore and Hunter. Granted the sample size is much larger than the other two, but as much as I want to see LMJ play more, there is some room for lots of growth as a runner.

http://www.pro-football-reference.com/play-index/play_finder.cgi?request=1&match=summary_all&year_min=&year_max=&team_id=&opp_id=&game_type=R&playoff_round=&game_num_min=0&game_num_max=99&week_num_min=0&week_num_max=99&quarter=1&quarter=2&quarter=3&quarter=4&quarter=5&tr_gtlt=lt&minutes=15&seconds=00&down=0&down=1&down=2&down=3&down=4&ytg_gtlt=gt&yds_to_go=&yg_gtlt=gt&yards=&is_first_down=-1&fp_gtlt=gt&fp_tm_opp=team&fp_ydline=&type=PASS&type=RUSH&is_turnover=-1&is_scoring=-1&no_play=0&game_day_of_week=&game_location=&game_result=&margin_min=&margin_max=&order_by=yards&rusher_id=JameLa00

breaks down all his career runs

Based off of this, he has some pretty good runs and does it consistently enough to warrant him 5 carries a game.
Originally posted by NCommand:
Again, one of the major underlining factors here (constantly ignored) is the "Fall of the Roman." Aside from VD and now, finally, Gore, this OC has no clue how to use personnel in his college offense. The most creative thing he's done to help scheme proper personnel this year was calling a middle screen to Hunter (success) and using Williams on an actual end-around (success). Now, don't expect to see either play ever again.

I agree. I remember they used to run that end around with Ted Ginn a couple of times in 2011. I think we saw it less in 2012 and I think last week was the first time they ran it this season with Kyle Williams. I've said in other threads I'd love to know what another OC could do with all these weapons. I've seen so many more do more with less.
Originally posted by ElephantHaley:
I honestly thought the 49ers would be getting more out of this dude. He was amazing in College but that was against soft defenses turns out. Picking him at #61 overall looks like a silly move now. He coulda been had a round or 2 later. the 12' draft has to go down as an utter disaster.

Blame that on the 49ers for not using him. This guy would've probably been on the bench all of 2012 if it weren't for Kendall Hunter's injury. Hunter is the better back, but LMJ proved he is a capable #2 back.

I wonder if part of the problem is also the lack of overall commitment to the run game the first three games of the season and the offenses failure to sustain drives. Not sustaining drives means less opportunities to run. If our offense is churning the way it should, Gore should be able to get around 15-18 a game, Hunter should be at 10-15, and James should be able to get 5-7 carries consistently. Of course that should change if any of our running backs gets hot out there.
Originally posted by LifelongNiner:
I've said in other threads I'd love to know what another OC could do with all these weapons. I've seen so many more do more with less.

I believe this is the biggest root cause of everything. We have x2 the weapons, if not way more, than most teams yet I continually witness teams with far less talent and "no-names" produce at a rapid rate d/t scheme, offensive philosophy, opportunities, etc.

This Grant article just about covers all of our concerns as well...http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2013/10/commentary/deep-trouble-for-49ers-passing-game-starting-with-play-calling/. Here are some highlights:

Since the Packers game, Kaepernick has posted Tim-Tebow-like numbers – 50 percent completions and a putrid 62 passer rating over the past four games.

– not going through the full progression, sensing pressure that isn't there and missing open receivers downfield.

Baalke couldn't take it. He burst out of his chair. "Throw the ball!" he yelled.

The issue is the 49ers' passing scheme. It lacks rhythm and continuity.

Name the 49ers' go-to passing play.

The 49ers' offensive philosophy has become simple: Run the ball, or fake the run and chuck it downfield.

The 49ers currently lead the league in that category, going three-and-out on 43 percent of their drives.

The 49ers have Kaepernick throwing the ball more than 20 yards downfield 15 percent of the time, close to the league high. Compare that to Alex Smith, who threw it downfield 8.7 percent of the time last season when he was a 49er, or Peyton Manning, who currently is throwing the ball downfield on 9.1 percent of his passes.

Last season, Kaepernick was the best downfield passer in the NFL. According to Pro Football Focus, his downfield accuracy was 60 percent (counting catches and drops). This season, his downfield accuracy has plummeted to 30 percent. But the 49ers keep making him throw deep 15 percent of the time.

You'd think the 49ers would adjust their play-calling to help Kaepernick end his slump. "I don't know that we're going to bang our head into a brick wall all day. We want to give our players a chance to be successful." That's what Greg Roman said on Sept. 19 in response to a question concerning his running game. It's time for him to apply his own advice to his anemic, 31st-ranked passing game.

He completed two passes after the first drive of the game.

It is Jim Harbaugh's and Greg Roman's job to give Kaepernick a chance to develop continuity and confidence. Harbaugh and Roman must start calling more "small" throws, easy completions, confidence boosters that get other receivers involved and developed as potential weapons. It is not all about deep passes. The 49ers need to call more slants, more bubble screens, more one-step hitch routes. Let the receiver get yards after the catch like a punt returner. Get him "in space" where he can go one-on-one against a defensive back.

Take the pressure off Kaepernick until he breaks out of his slump. Go back to the basics and re-establish a foundation for the passing offense.

You know, the West Coast Offense. Bill Walsh stuff. Classic 49ers stuff.
Ammmmmmmmeeeen! Time to ditch the Anti-WCO College Offense and revisit the "WCO Library" before we ruin Kaepernick.
Originally posted by tatdwolf49:
Originally posted by OregonDuckNiner:
Originally posted by tatdwolf49:
Originally posted by OregonDuckNiner:
Originally posted by tatdwolf49:
Originally posted by OregonDuckNiner:
Get this dude the f**king ball. With a team lacking explosiveness at the play-making positions, you'd think we'd try to find ways to get him some touches.

Why he cant do jack sh*t when he dose get a touches ...He looks like Reggie Bush when he first came in thinking his speed will get him to tha next level ...Im sick of him already i see a wasted 2nd round pick.....

Oh GTFO he's touched the ball literally six times this year.

N he aint done sh*t with none of them .....

He averaged 8 yards a carry tonight AND averaged 4.6 yards per carry last year during his rookie season without getting calls played for him that utilize his special abilities.

And if you're going to judge a player on 6 touches in a season, then I don't even know what to tell you.

Ever player gets judged by everyone N thats my judgement .....
*and
Originally posted by NCommand:
Originally posted by LifelongNiner:
I've said in other threads I'd love to know what another OC could do with all these weapons. I've seen so many more do more with less.

I believe this is the biggest root cause of everything. We have x2 the weapons, if not way more, than most teams yet I continually witness teams with far less talent and "no-names" produce at a rapid rate d/t scheme, offensive philosophy, opportunities, etc.

This Grant article just about covers all of our concerns as well...http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2013/10/commentary/deep-trouble-for-49ers-passing-game-starting-with-play-calling/. Here are some highlights:

Since the Packers game, Kaepernick has posted Tim-Tebow-like numbers – 50 percent completions and a putrid 62 passer rating over the past four games.

– not going through the full progression, sensing pressure that isn't there and missing open receivers downfield.

Baalke couldn't take it. He burst out of his chair. "Throw the ball!" he yelled.

The issue is the 49ers' passing scheme. It lacks rhythm and continuity.

Name the 49ers' go-to passing play.

The 49ers' offensive philosophy has become simple: Run the ball, or fake the run and chuck it downfield.

The 49ers currently lead the league in that category, going three-and-out on 43 percent of their drives.

The 49ers have Kaepernick throwing the ball more than 20 yards downfield 15 percent of the time, close to the league high. Compare that to Alex Smith, who threw it downfield 8.7 percent of the time last season when he was a 49er, or Peyton Manning, who currently is throwing the ball downfield on 9.1 percent of his passes.

Last season, Kaepernick was the best downfield passer in the NFL. According to Pro Football Focus, his downfield accuracy was 60 percent (counting catches and drops). This season, his downfield accuracy has plummeted to 30 percent. But the 49ers keep making him throw deep 15 percent of the time.

You'd think the 49ers would adjust their play-calling to help Kaepernick end his slump. "I don't know that we're going to bang our head into a brick wall all day. We want to give our players a chance to be successful." That's what Greg Roman said on Sept. 19 in response to a question concerning his running game. It's time for him to apply his own advice to his anemic, 31st-ranked passing game.

He completed two passes after the first drive of the game.

It is Jim Harbaugh's and Greg Roman's job to give Kaepernick a chance to develop continuity and confidence. Harbaugh and Roman must start calling more "small" throws, easy completions, confidence boosters that get other receivers involved and developed as potential weapons. It is not all about deep passes. The 49ers need to call more slants, more bubble screens, more one-step hitch routes. Let the receiver get yards after the catch like a punt returner. Get him "in space" where he can go one-on-one against a defensive back.

Take the pressure off Kaepernick until he breaks out of his slump. Go back to the basics and re-establish a foundation for the passing offense.

You know, the West Coast Offense. Bill Walsh stuff. Classic 49ers stuff.
Ammmmmmmmeeeen! Time to ditch the Anti-WCO College Offense and revisit the "WCO Library" before we ruin Kaepernick.

This is a great read and so true hopefully the coaches wake up and just go back to last years offense
Originally posted by NCommand:
I believe this is the biggest root cause of everything. We have x2 the weapons, if not way more, than most teams yet I continually witness teams with far less talent and "no-names" produce at a rapid rate d/t scheme, offensive philosophy, opportunities, etc.

This Grant article just about covers all of our concerns as well...http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2013/10/commentary/deep-trouble-for-49ers-passing-game-starting-with-play-calling/. Here are some highlights:

Since the Packers game, Kaepernick has posted Tim-Tebow-like numbers – 50 percent completions and a putrid 62 passer rating over the past four games.

– not going through the full progression, sensing pressure that isn't there and missing open receivers downfield.

Baalke couldn't take it. He burst out of his chair. "Throw the ball!" he yelled.

The issue is the 49ers' passing scheme. It lacks rhythm and continuity.

Name the 49ers' go-to passing play.

The 49ers' offensive philosophy has become simple: Run the ball, or fake the run and chuck it downfield.

The 49ers currently lead the league in that category, going three-and-out on 43 percent of their drives.

The 49ers have Kaepernick throwing the ball more than 20 yards downfield 15 percent of the time, close to the league high. Compare that to Alex Smith, who threw it downfield 8.7 percent of the time last season when he was a 49er, or Peyton Manning, who currently is throwing the ball downfield on 9.1 percent of his passes.

Last season, Kaepernick was the best downfield passer in the NFL. According to Pro Football Focus, his downfield accuracy was 60 percent (counting catches and drops). This season, his downfield accuracy has plummeted to 30 percent. But the 49ers keep making him throw deep 15 percent of the time.

You'd think the 49ers would adjust their play-calling to help Kaepernick end his slump. "I don't know that we're going to bang our head into a brick wall all day. We want to give our players a chance to be successful." That's what Greg Roman said on Sept. 19 in response to a question concerning his running game. It's time for him to apply his own advice to his anemic, 31st-ranked passing game.

He completed two passes after the first drive of the game.

It is Jim Harbaugh's and Greg Roman's job to give Kaepernick a chance to develop continuity and confidence. Harbaugh and Roman must start calling more "small" throws, easy completions, confidence boosters that get other receivers involved and developed as potential weapons. It is not all about deep passes. The 49ers need to call more slants, more bubble screens, more one-step hitch routes. Let the receiver get yards after the catch like a punt returner. Get him "in space" where he can go one-on-one against a defensive back.

Take the pressure off Kaepernick until he breaks out of his slump. Go back to the basics and re-establish a foundation for the passing offense.

You know, the West Coast Offense. Bill Walsh stuff. Classic 49ers stuff.
Ammmmmmmmeeeen! Time to ditch the Anti-WCO College Offense and revisit the "WCO Library" before we ruin Kaepernick.

Nice stats posted in the article about how most passes are still going deep, but the success rate is pathetic compared to last season.

You cannot run short routes (bubble screens, one step hitches) when the CB is playing press man. You are asking for pick 6s. The CB has to be giving a slight cushion to pull this off. They have run two bubble screens the last two weeks. The one versus the Rams, Patton decided to catch the ball then start running towards the middle of the field where all the LBs are. He gets smashed and breaks his foot. Still no clue why he thought running towards the middle of the field would earn him more space to elude tacklers.

Versus HOU, they ran one to Boldin. A key aspect to a WR bubble screen is having the other WRs block. Kyle loses his block and the play is blown up before it had a chance. They also ran 3 screen plays to RBs in the Rams game. One to the left which failed miserably to Gore (incomplete), one to the right where Kap didn't throw the ball to Hunter (Robert Quinn sacked Kap and kisses his bicep). Then the one to Hunter in the middle of the field which worked for a first down (like NC mentioned).

Slants to Boldin and Baldwin can work, but there must be confidence to throw into a tight window and the ability for the WR to use his body to shield the defender, this is plausible in both respects. I feel, the way to beat man coverage is double moves with confidence from the QB to throw WRs open (before the WR makes his second move). Kap does not have the confidence to make these kind of throws. Whether that lack of confidence is with himself or the WR, who knows.

Taking this back to LMJ. He can be a very key weapon in getting Kap out of this funk. Short passes to the RBs is exactly what this offense needs. With the LBs always playing an intermediate zone and spying on Kap, the flats are open to RBs. Hit LMJ or Hunter in stride and see what they can do versus a LB in space. This is 'Classic 49er stuff'. How many times did Roger Craig, Ricky Watters, and Tom Rathman get these short passes? Lots, and eventually it makes the LBs creep up, then that opens up other areas of the field.
Originally posted by smithgdwg:
Screen passes!!!!

yeah i dont get it.. i havent seen the nines utilize the screen passes that much and yet they have some TE's to line up at receivers.. get LMJ outs on the field more!!
Originally posted by thl408:
Originally posted by NCommand:
I believe this is the biggest root cause of everything. We have x2 the weapons, if not way more, than most teams yet I continually witness teams with far less talent and "no-names" produce at a rapid rate d/t scheme, offensive philosophy, opportunities, etc.

This Grant article just about covers all of our concerns as well...http://49ers.pressdemocrat.com/2013/10/commentary/deep-trouble-for-49ers-passing-game-starting-with-play-calling/. Here are some highlights:

Since the Packers game, Kaepernick has posted Tim-Tebow-like numbers – 50 percent completions and a putrid 62 passer rating over the past four games.

– not going through the full progression, sensing pressure that isn't there and missing open receivers downfield.

Baalke couldn't take it. He burst out of his chair. "Throw the ball!" he yelled.

The issue is the 49ers' passing scheme. It lacks rhythm and continuity.

Name the 49ers' go-to passing play.

The 49ers' offensive philosophy has become simple: Run the ball, or fake the run and chuck it downfield.

The 49ers currently lead the league in that category, going three-and-out on 43 percent of their drives.

The 49ers have Kaepernick throwing the ball more than 20 yards downfield 15 percent of the time, close to the league high. Compare that to Alex Smith, who threw it downfield 8.7 percent of the time last season when he was a 49er, or Peyton Manning, who currently is throwing the ball downfield on 9.1 percent of his passes.

Last season, Kaepernick was the best downfield passer in the NFL. According to Pro Football Focus, his downfield accuracy was 60 percent (counting catches and drops). This season, his downfield accuracy has plummeted to 30 percent. But the 49ers keep making him throw deep 15 percent of the time.

You'd think the 49ers would adjust their play-calling to help Kaepernick end his slump. "I don't know that we're going to bang our head into a brick wall all day. We want to give our players a chance to be successful." That's what Greg Roman said on Sept. 19 in response to a question concerning his running game. It's time for him to apply his own advice to his anemic, 31st-ranked passing game.

He completed two passes after the first drive of the game.

It is Jim Harbaugh's and Greg Roman's job to give Kaepernick a chance to develop continuity and confidence. Harbaugh and Roman must start calling more "small" throws, easy completions, confidence boosters that get other receivers involved and developed as potential weapons. It is not all about deep passes. The 49ers need to call more slants, more bubble screens, more one-step hitch routes. Let the receiver get yards after the catch like a punt returner. Get him "in space" where he can go one-on-one against a defensive back.

Take the pressure off Kaepernick until he breaks out of his slump. Go back to the basics and re-establish a foundation for the passing offense.

You know, the West Coast Offense. Bill Walsh stuff. Classic 49ers stuff.
Ammmmmmmmeeeen! Time to ditch the Anti-WCO College Offense and revisit the "WCO Library" before we ruin Kaepernick.

Nice stats posted in the article about how most passes are still going deep, but the success rate is pathetic compared to last season.

You cannot run short routes (bubble screens, one step hitches) when the CB is playing press man. You are asking for pick 6s. The CB has to be giving a slight cushion to pull this off. They have run two bubble screens the last two weeks. The one versus the Rams, Patton decided to catch the ball then start running towards the middle of the field where all the LBs are. He gets smashed and breaks his foot. Still no clue why he thought running towards the middle of the field would earn him more space to elude tacklers.

Versus HOU, they ran one to Boldin. A key aspect to a WR bubble screen is having the other WRs block. Kyle loses his block and the play is blown up before it had a chance. They also ran 3 screen plays to RBs in the Rams game. One to the left which failed miserably to Gore (incomplete), one to the right where Kap didn't throw the ball to Hunter (Robert Quinn sacked Kap and kisses his bicep). Then the one to Hunter in the middle of the field which worked for a first down (like NC mentioned).

Slants to Boldin and Baldwin can work, but there must be confidence to throw into a tight window and the ability for the WR to use his body to shield the defender, this is plausible in both respects. I feel, the way to beat man coverage is double moves with confidence from the QB to throw WRs open (before the WR makes his second move). Kap does not have the confidence to make these kind of throws. Whether that lack of confidence is with himself or the WR, who knows.

Taking this back to LMJ. He can be a very key weapon in getting Kap out of this funk. Short passes to the RBs is exactly what this offense needs. With the LBs always playing an intermediate zone and spying on Kap, the flats are open to RBs. Hit LMJ or Hunter in stride and see what they can do versus a LB in space. This is 'Classic 49er stuff'. How many times did Roger Craig, Ricky Watters, and Tom Rathman get these short passes? Lots, and eventually it makes the LBs creep up, then that opens up other areas of the field.

Very nice post...just saw this! Love the points about the slant and utilizing James better.
The problem is he and Hunter have very similar skillsets. Hard to split up carries between two similar back, when those carries are limited already.

TBH i would consider shipping out one or the other if the right offer came through. Neither will be a feature back when Gore is done, and no point having both on the roster if one is just gona waste away their early career not getting carries.
I think the Quick hitting WHAM run plays with LMJ would work really well with his quickness. And also like you guys are saying screen passes also.