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Media and the 49ers

turns out Kaep was a Huge project that could take a couple more years but then howcome he took the league by storm the 2nd half of last season? I think 80% coaching/playcalling and 20% growing pains.
Originally posted by ElephantHaley:
He's 80% right. but.....Kaep also deserves some blame for holding onto the ball too long. And Kaeps fault is NOT trusting other recievers other then VD and Quan. Now I know Ronald McDonald dropped that sweet Long Gainer and also KW is a Crub, but you still have to throw to these dudes to make sure defenses have to defend the entire field. And Kap has failed miserably finding 3rd and 4th options. Also Pass Protection has been poopy lately vs Carolina.
Closer to 90% I think. Kaep hasnt been playing well. But when you are in a five step drop there is no getting the ball out early. If the rush makes you bail it doesnt matter if the guy back across the field finally came open and most importantly if the play is designed with only one or two reads and the others are decoys with no intent of getting open....looking to them means less than nothing. Like Cohn said...this is a guy I dont often agree with mind you, this is Jimmy Raye crap out there.

Kap looked bad for sure, and especially some of the bad throws were on him....but he is being set up to fail by the game plan, lack of protection and absurd lack of adjustment in the face of failure. Beyond that when he does do something great like a long pass or a great escape from pressure it is often ruined by a poorly timed drop or a stupid penalty. Look across the side line at Carolina when we were shutting Cam down they adjusted to short drops, crossing patterns, used their run game to set up the pass...Cams stat line was pretty damn bad, but he isnt being bashed by his fans today because they eeked out a win with timely adjustments that played to what our D was giving them and put him in easy down and distance using high percentage throws on plays that developed quickly.
I'm looking for the article on the references to boxing and Muhammed Ali in comparison to the Niners going up against their opponents. I thought that anaolgy article was pretty accurate

It was from one of the Cohn goons
[ Edited by SFL49ER on Nov 12, 2013 at 8:45 AM ]
I don't know about that column... Smith would have taken a thousand sacks instead of 6? Kap could have checked down or threw the ball away on a couple of those sacks. I think that is inaccurate. Also, Cohn says that Kap is the right QB instead of Alex because Alex is so methodical he only makes the throw when its perfect and the guy is open. This entire year, Kap has done the same thing basically. He isn't "throwing guys open." I still think the niners had to make the move to Kap, but this summary from Cohn is inaccurate.
Originally posted by ElephantHaley:
turns out Kaep was a Huge project that could take a couple more years but then howcome he took the league by storm the 2nd half of last season? I think 80% coaching/playcalling and 20% growing pains.

You know i thought the same thing, but u know how....... Newbie on the field. That Chicago game, what tape did anyone have on Kaep other than some college stuff. So just like with the first season implementation of the wildcat, u catch everyone by storm.

And some dont look at it, but lets face fact. Because of how he took the world by storm, teams studied how to get to the mobile qB now, and a lot of the same things that worked last year, wont work this year. Kind of like fool me once shame on you, fool me twice, shame on me.

Also remember how some were even saying, all kaep needs to learn to do now is go thru progressions, read the defense, and above all build a pocket presence. I think he has worked on all these in the offseason, but didnt know he needed even more work.

I think he'll get it together, it's not too late.
Just to play Devil's advocate here; Has the thought sparked anyone else's mind that maybe Alex played a much deeper role in the game planing and getting Kap ready for gameday during his 10 game run last season? Not only that but having him on the sidelines to point things out, study pictures after the series, etc. I don't mind if my QB struggles at points in the game, but at some point I expect you to figure out the defense to a certain degree and find an open man. Maybe Alex was holding Kap's hand last season and now he's trying to figure these out with someone just as clueless as him in Colt???

All in all this was only Kap's 16th regular season game I believe which puts him far behind Luck, Wilson, RG3 etc. Seeing Luck play a far worse game yesterday, tells me not to panic over a 1 point loss to a beast of a front 7. My whole approach with Kap was that we should look forward to our true glory years somewhere after his fourth full year of starting, anything we win this year or up until that point is just icing on the cake.
Originally posted by 24plus25er:
Just to play Devil's advocate here; Has the thought sparked anyone else's mind that maybe Alex played a much deeper role in the game planing and getting Kap ready for gameday during his 10 game run last season? Not only that but having him on the sidelines to point things out, study pictures after the series, etc. I don't mind if my QB struggles at points in the game, but at some point I expect you to figure out the defense to a certain degree and find an open man. Maybe Alex was holding Kap's hand last season and now he's trying to figure these out with someone just as clueless as him in Colt???

All in all this was only Kap's 16th regular season game I believe which puts him far behind Luck, Wilson, RG3 etc. Seeing Luck play a far worse game yesterday, tells me not to panic over a 1 point loss to a beast of a front 7. My whole approach with Kap was that we should look forward to our true glory years somewhere after his fourth full year of starting, anything we win this year or up until that point is just icing on the cake.
Good point brotha. I remember when Smith said that last year, that he's always studying with Kaep. You used to always see it after Kaep took over last year.

Now I love cake just like the next man, lol. But if this is the real deal, then that would mean we are rebuilding a bit. J. Smith, Gore, and Co, don't seem like they have 2-4 more years to wait on a SB. And if we are now using the idea he just aint ready yet, then why is he our starter now, instead of sitting and learning.

I just think Harbs and Co, thought after last season he was ready.
Pretty much everything I've been saying. Outstanding article by Cohn for once.

Second Reason:The coaches install the offensive game plan, and the 49ers' offensive game plan is the pits. If you want to dump on anyone, dump on Harbaugh and Roman. Harbaugh held his weekly news conference on Monday. I was not able to attend — personal reasons — so Grant Cohn asked two questions for me:

Q: The offense ran one screen — it was a pass to Kyle Williams in the second quarter on a third-and-20-something. Why not call screens more often in this game and in general?

HARBAUGH: That's not a bad point. Point well taken.

Q: Colin Kaepernick bootlegged twice against the Panthers. Why not move the pocket more frequently, especially considering how fast he is?

HARBAUGH: That's something that is always in our game plan. That's another area we didn't have a good result. You bring up a great point which frustrates everybody involved in the unit when you're not in the rhythm picking up first downs and being able to get in deeper to your playbook — get into the screen, get into the movement game, keep things off balance. It's frustrating to all.

Those are fascinating answers. Harbaugh ducked most questions in the news conference — I know because I watched on television. He would not criticize Kaepernick, refused to discuss Eric Mangini, stuff like that. But he embraced those tough questions, and that says something good about him. He answers tough questions when they are about football and to the point

He admitted the Niners should use screen passes to take pressure off Kaepernick. And he admitted, without saying it, that some of those sacks were on the game plan, and not on the quarterback. He also implied the offensive game plan was predictable, that the 49ers did not "keep things off balance." And he regretted not being more clever on offense. It's all right there in his words.




That leads us to the big question: Why are Harbaugh and Roman so stodgy? Why have they not developed an up-to-date passing game with multiple receiving threats out of the backfield and wide receivers and tight ends?

Why does it always boil down to Anquan Boldin and Vernon Davis? And please don't say players are hurt. In the NFL players get hurt. Next man up.

Let's approach the answer in a roundabout way. When Harbaugh took over the 49ers, we assumed he was returning to the West Coast Offense. He said he was returning to the West Coast Offense. And for a time he did return.

But he's wandered, wandered right back to his football roots. His roots are not on the West Coast. He is Midwest with a shallow overlay of Palo Alto. His football roots are the University of Michigan and his coach, the legendary Bo Schembechler, who advocated power football, brawn over brains.

Of course, this is an over-simplification, a schematic. But it has validity.




After Kaepernick took over from Alex Smith, Harbaugh altered his offensive philosophy.

With Smith, Harbaugh played "small ball," and it worked. With Kaepernick, a better athlete than Smith, Harbaugh plays home-run ball — power runs right up the gut and long throws.

The offense is simpler now, but not effective. You almost never see screens or draw plays, or shallow crosses — two pass catchers crossing just past the line of scrimmage. You never see a back pretending to block, then jogging past the line unnoticed for a short pass which he often turns into a first down.

Imagination. The imagination is gone. Harbaugh does what he does with minimal adjustments. "This is what we do. Stop us." It's become his creed. That kind of simple, hard-nosed football usually works until a team like Carolina, more hard-nosed, stops the Niners.
[ Edited by Phoenix49ers on Nov 12, 2013 at 9:05 AM ]
Another excellent article by Lowell Cohn.
Harbaugh's failure to adjust is startling. His quarterback is getting murdered, six sacks, and he sticks with a five-step drop or play action. Jim, make it easy on the kid. Help him. Throw a screen. Roll him out. This is Jimmy Raye stuff you are running. The failure is on you and the coaches.

Walsh always was adjusting, always tinkering, was always one step ahead. He refused to bang his head — or his players' heads — against a wall. That's why his game plans were beautiful.

I am not saying Harbaugh is a bad coach. I am not saying he's a bad person. Nothing like that. I'm saying he has lost his way. He is living in California in 2013 and he's not living in Ann Arbor in the 1980s. Jim, exit the past and haul your offense into the Modern Era.


I've been saying for awhile that this offense has been going backwards, that since 2011 you gradually have seen less and less WCO concepts, more Bo and Lindy ball, its become more stale, more predictable, they had a moment with the read option but that is gone now that defense's have adjusted to it, would like to see Harbaugh utilize some more of those WCO concepts like he promised when he was first hired.
The article sounds fair to me. There's plenty of blame to go around, including the coaches.
  • Jcool
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 13,818
Originally posted by 190836:
Another excellent article by Lowell Cohn.

said no one ever.
Originally posted by Mr.Mcgibblets:
cliff notes for the lazy and disinclined?

Let's just say the title is "Don't blame kaepernick".
Originally posted by Jcool:
Originally posted by 190836:
Another excellent article by Lowell Cohn.

said no one ever.

LMAO