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"Steve Young never learned how to read defenses"

Originally posted by elhebrewhammer:
Originally posted by WestCoastForever:
Oh, yeah. He really struggled in that superbowl win. Some kind of crazy luck . . .

Ironically, he slips on the play and uses...GASP...athleticism to over come it.

Stop being a homer and realize that the GB defense had as much to do with that play as Steve Young and Terrell Owens. I'm not hating on the guy at all and I think he's f**king awesome, but to think that Steve Young made that play happen because he was "reading the defense" and it was all the Niners doing, is just plain blind homerism. Young and Owens both made spectacular plays, but thank goodness it was also an awful defensive play as well.

As my buddy Lowell Cohn would say... please. Of Course Steve read the defense on that play. He read the coverage, and he saw where the ball had to go. He had a ridiculously Small window (can you see the 4 defenders around the football? anything less than a perfect throw would have been knocked down, or incomplete). By the end of Young's career he was bery good at reading defenses, and didn't rely on his scrambling ability anywhere near as much as early on. I mean come on man, what's your deal!?
Originally posted by dtcomposer:
Originally posted by elhebrewhammer:
Originally posted by WestCoastForever:
Oh, yeah. He really struggled in that superbowl win. Some kind of crazy luck . . .

Ironically, he slips on the play and uses...GASP...athleticism to over come it.

Stop being a homer and realize that the GB defense had as much to do with that play as Steve Young and Terrell Owens. I'm not hating on the guy at all and I think he's f**king awesome, but to think that Steve Young made that play happen because he was "reading the defense" and it was all the Niners doing, is just plain blind homerism. Young and Owens both made spectacular plays, but thank goodness it was also an awful defensive play as well.

As my buddy Lowell Cohn would say... please. Of Course Steve read the defense on that play. He read the coverage, and he saw where the ball had to go. He had a ridiculously Small window (can you see the 4 defenders around the football? anything less than a perfect throw would have been knocked down, or incomplete). By the end of Young's career he was bery good at reading defenses, and didn't rely on his scrambling ability anywhere near as much as early on. I mean come on man, what's your deal!?

That right there tells me he didn't read the defense. If there were 4 defenders around the ball, then someone else was wide open.

Also, Grant Napier never said he couldn't read defenses. He said out of the HOF QB's, Steve Young was the worst at reading defenses.
Originally posted by Joecool:
That right there tells me he didn't read the defense. If there were 4 defenders around the ball, then someone else was wide open.

Also, Grant Napier never said he couldn't read defenses. He said out of the HOF QB's, Steve Young was the worst at reading defenses.

THANK YOU. We are comparing Steve Young to ALL THE OF HOF QBS. No one has said he couldn't read defense and I was only talking about one play in his entire career. The defense f**ked up and Steve Young and TO took advantage and it was an amazing play by both of them. HOW DARE I SAY SUCH HORRIBLE THINGS ABOUT STEVE YOUNG.

Steve Young was an amazing athlete with a great arm and at times relied too much on that athleticism and arm to get him out of trouble. Sometimes that worked and sometimes that didn't. As his career continued he learned to play smarter football and his maturation helped the Niners get and win a Superbowl (and remain contenders for a long time as well). I'm not hating on Steve Young at all. I mentioned one play and suddenly I have a "deal" and need to be flamed.I very much enjoyed watching Steve Young become the player he became and 94 was really one of the best years any QB has ever had. I wish concussions wouldn't have knocked him out so soon. I really think he had few more years left him regardless if his athleticism would begin to fail him because he was not just an "running QB" anymore. He was better than that.

In the end, If you honestly believe that GB played perfect defense on that play and believe that I'm not giving credit to Steve and TO, than I'm not sure what to tell you.
Originally posted by Joecool:
That ball was going to that spot no matter how many defenders would have been there. It was more of a luck play than anything. He was going to TO on the post no matter what the defense was playing. It was an accurate throw, it was a great throw, it was a great catch but it had NOTHING to do with any defensive read. What got Steve Young to one of the top QB's was his accuracy and intangibles. His ability to read defenses is over rated which is why he struggled against the better teams.

I know you were citing Catch 2. This is the language that prompted me to cite the Superbowl as a better sample of what kind of player Young was. He dominated, utterly destroyed with accuracy, brilliance, and peerless execution the best team in the AFC. No struggle. No luck. He read their defenses all right, but the 49'er's offense dictated what they were going to do, because they were a machine.

There is no basis to contend that Steve Young was at all inferior to any of HOF quarterbacks (except for the other 49'er in there).

Yeah, I'm a homer. But I've seen beautiful football--and everybody else's has never come close. Make it happen again, Coach Harbaugh!
[ Edited by WestCoastForever on Aug 25, 2011 at 8:39 PM ]
thank goodness for the,

"Jim Harbaugh Center For QB's Who Can't Read Defenses Good And Wanna Learn To Do Other Stuff Good Too"

Originally posted by SybErkRimInAL:
thank goodness for the,

"Jim Harbaugh Center For QB's Who Can't Read Defenses Good And Wanna Learn To Do Other Stuff Good Too"


...wanna learn to do other stuff good too
Originally posted by Joecool:
Originally posted by dtcomposer:
Originally posted by elhebrewhammer:
Originally posted by WestCoastForever:
Oh, yeah. He really struggled in that superbowl win. Some kind of crazy luck . . .

Ironically, he slips on the play and uses...GASP...athleticism to over come it.

Stop being a homer and realize that the GB defense had as much to do with that play as Steve Young and Terrell Owens. I'm not hating on the guy at all and I think he's f**king awesome, but to think that Steve Young made that play happen because he was "reading the defense" and it was all the Niners doing, is just plain blind homerism. Young and Owens both made spectacular plays, but thank goodness it was also an awful defensive play as well.

As my buddy Lowell Cohn would say... please. Of Course Steve read the defense on that play. He read the coverage, and he saw where the ball had to go. He had a ridiculously Small window (can you see the 4 defenders around the football? anything less than a perfect throw would have been knocked down, or incomplete). By the end of Young's career he was bery good at reading defenses, and didn't rely on his scrambling ability anywhere near as much as early on. I mean come on man, what's your deal!?

That right there tells me he didn't read the defense. If there were 4 defenders around the ball, then someone else was wide open.

Also, Grant Napier never said he couldn't read defenses. He said out of the HOF QB's, Steve Young was the worst at reading defenses.
Yeah there were probably plenty of guys open underneath but they couldn't have scored a touchdown. I'm sure there were also some nice running room available for Young if he so desired. Come on we need to use our heads a little bit on this one. There was only one thing that would have made that play work, and it was an absolutely perfect throw. That is why the play was so great... it was covered correctly, but Young read the only place where a touchdown was possible and made a great throw. I don't see how you can look at it any other way.

Also, it is ridiculous to say that Steve Young doesn'r read defenses better than those other guys. Half of the QB's in the Hall played in an era where the reads and defenses were much simpler. The introduction of the WCO forced a defensive evolution... This is the dumbest conversation to be having and you are taking the most ridiculous position. Certainly there are better readers of the defense then Young in the Hall, but Young was no slouch and regardless it is almost impossible to truly quantify an ability to read defenses. By any statistical or anecdotal model Steve Young dissected NFL defenses like they had never been dissected before, hence his (at the time) record QB rating, and success. I would put Tom Brady, and Peyton Manning above him in the modern Era, but I can't think of another QB who did it better during his prime years (Obviously Montana was great, but I am talking about the 90's on)
Originally posted by dtcomposer:
Originally posted by Joecool:
Originally posted by dtcomposer:
Originally posted by elhebrewhammer:
Originally posted by WestCoastForever:
Oh, yeah. He really struggled in that superbowl win. Some kind of crazy luck . . .

Ironically, he slips on the play and uses...GASP...athleticism to over come it.

Stop being a homer and realize that the GB defense had as much to do with that play as Steve Young and Terrell Owens. I'm not hating on the guy at all and I think he's f**king awesome, but to think that Steve Young made that play happen because he was "reading the defense" and it was all the Niners doing, is just plain blind homerism. Young and Owens both made spectacular plays, but thank goodness it was also an awful defensive play as well.

As my buddy Lowell Cohn would say... please. Of Course Steve read the defense on that play. He read the coverage, and he saw where the ball had to go. He had a ridiculously Small window (can you see the 4 defenders around the football? anything less than a perfect throw would have been knocked down, or incomplete). By the end of Young's career he was bery good at reading defenses, and didn't rely on his scrambling ability anywhere near as much as early on. I mean come on man, what's your deal!?

That right there tells me he didn't read the defense. If there were 4 defenders around the ball, then someone else was wide open.

Also, Grant Napier never said he couldn't read defenses. He said out of the HOF QB's, Steve Young was the worst at reading defenses.
Yeah there were probably plenty of guys open underneath but they couldn't have scored a touchdown. I'm sure there were also some nice running room available for Young if he so desired. Come on we need to use our heads a little bit on this one. There was only one thing that would have made that play work, and it was an absolutely perfect throw. That is why the play was so great... it was covered correctly, but Young read the only place where a touchdown was possible and made a great throw. I don't see how you can look at it any other way.

Also, it is ridiculous to say that Steve Young doesn'r read defenses better than those other guys. Half of the QB's in the Hall played in an era where the reads and defenses were much simpler. The introduction of the WCO forced a defensive evolution... This is the dumbest conversation to be having and you are taking the most ridiculous position. Certainly there are better readers of the defense then Young in the Hall, but Young was no slouch and regardless it is almost impossible to truly quantify an ability to read defenses. By any statistical or anecdotal model Steve Young dissected NFL defenses like they had never been dissected before, hence his (at the time) record QB rating, and success. I would put Tom Brady, and Peyton Manning above him in the modern Era, but I can't think of another QB who did it better during his prime years (Obviously Montana was great, but I am talking about the 90's on)

Originally posted by WillistheWall:
you're seriously going to compare trent dilfer and steve young?

Re-read what I wrote.

I'm saying you should NOT compare the two. You are making my point for me with your .
highest all time QBR and a TD/Int ratio of 2.17. Yeaaaaahh, dude doesn't know how to read defenses
You dont become the all time leader in passer rating without being one of the best at reading defenses. Not only that but defenses were a lot tougher to read in Youngs era than previous era's. Young was a student of the game who transformed his style from an athletic instinctual QB to a smart decision making QB.
[ Edited by skibeerski on Aug 25, 2011 at 10:31 PM ]
Originally posted by Joecool:
That right there tells me he didn't read the defense. If there were 4 defenders around the ball, then someone else was wide open.

Also, Grant Napier never said he couldn't read defenses. He said out of the HOF QB's, Steve Young was the worst at reading defenses.

Given the fact that Broadway Joe is a HOF, we know clearly that Grant Napier's statement is false.
Steve Young was a Mormon, so I believe it.
[ Edited by Kilgore_Trout on Aug 26, 2011 at 12:44 AM ]
Originally posted by sincalfaithful:
Originally posted by SybErkRimInAL:
thank goodness for the,

"Jim Harbaugh Center For QB's Who Can't Read Defenses Good And Wanna Learn To Do Other Stuff Good Too"


...wanna learn to do other stuff good too

Fantastic Zoolander reference.
Originally posted by dtcomposer:
Yeah there were probably plenty of guys open underneath but they couldn't have scored a touchdown. I'm sure there were also some nice running room available for Young if he so desired. Come on we need to use our heads a little bit on this one. There was only one thing that would have made that play work, and it was an absolutely perfect throw. That is why the play was so great... it was covered correctly, but Young read the only place where a touchdown was possible and made a great throw. I don't see how you can look at it any other way.

Also, it is ridiculous to say that Steve Young doesn'r read defenses better than those other guys. Half of the QB's in the Hall played in an era where the reads and defenses were much simpler. The introduction of the WCO forced a defensive evolution... This is the dumbest conversation to be having and you are taking the most ridiculous position. Certainly there are better readers of the defense then Young in the Hall, but Young was no slouch and regardless it is almost impossible to truly quantify an ability to read defenses. By any statistical or anecdotal model Steve Young dissected NFL defenses like they had never been dissected before, hence his (at the time) record QB rating, and success. I would put Tom Brady, and Peyton Manning above him in the modern Era, but I can't think of another QB who did it better during his prime years (Obviously Montana was great, but I am talking about the 90's on)

How do you explain his lack of production and stats in most playoffs?