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run the ball control the clock...

Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?
I think you should get your popcorn ready.


Now that the playbook has been opened up(i hope) life should be good. I used to get all the Kansas City Chiefs games where I live (when raye was there) and their offense was never as boring as raye here.

So if its finally opened, it should be good stuff.
Originally posted by unst4bl3:
I think you should get your popcorn ready.


Now that the playbook has been opened up(i hope) life should be good. I used to get all the Kansas City Chiefs games where I live (when raye was there) and their offense was never as boring as raye here.

So if its finally opened, it should be good stuff.

Very happy to hear this and look forward to A Smith being able to complete enough medium to long balls to open up the running game.
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I disagree with your initial premise. If you CAN run the ball effectively and control the clock, it is ABSOLUTELY a winning formula. However, we (the 49ers) cannot do that and there are many supporting elements to an effective ball-control running game.

What you need is an effective deep and intermediate ball threat. This will serve as a deterrent to defenders crowding the line of scrimmage -- not just counting men in the box. If a SS or ILB is 1 - 2 yards further away from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped -- because he doesn't want to get beat deep by a WR or TE -- that could mean 1 - 2 extra yards on a run play (or more).

I put intermediate ball as well because there are ways to counter a team with a deep threat and a good running game: Cover 2. Cover 2 takes away the deep ball and stops the run...and dares the other team to find receivers in traffic over the middle. An offense needs a good TE or physical WRs that aren't afraid to go over the middle.

I think we have the potential for an excellent intermediate game, with two solid TEs and a #1 WR (Crabtree) who will pull in the ball over the middle, take a hit, and hold on. Brandon Jones needs to step up for the deep game to develop.

One final point -- Bill Walsh demonstrated that you do not need to have an effective running game in order to control the clock and stretch a defense vertically. A quick-hit passing game will consume clock and draw defenders towards the line of scrimmage -- intermediate routes will put them back on their heels again. Walsh also believed that you can run the score up early w/ the passing game, then run the clock out in the second half.
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I disagree with your initial premise. If you CAN run the ball effectively and control the clock, it is ABSOLUTELY a winning formula. However, we (the 49ers) cannot do that and there are many supporting elements to an effective ball-control running game.

What you need is an effective deep and intermediate ball threat. This will serve as a deterrent to defenders crowding the line of scrimmage -- not just counting men in the box. If a SS or ILB is 1 - 2 yards further away from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped -- because he doesn't want to get beat deep by a WR or TE -- that could mean 1 - 2 extra yards on a run play (or more).

I put intermediate ball as well because there are ways to counter a team with a deep threat and a good running game: Cover 2. Cover 2 takes away the deep ball and stops the run...and dares the other team to find receivers in traffic over the middle. An offense needs a good TE or physical WRs that aren't afraid to go over the middle.

I think we have the potential for an excellent intermediate game, with two solid TEs and a #1 WR (Crabtree) who will pull in the ball over the middle, take a hit, and hold on. Brandon Jones needs to step up for the deep game to develop.

One final point -- Bill Walsh demonstrated that you do not need to have an effective running game in order to control the clock and stretch a defense vertically. A quick-hit passing game will consume clock and draw defenders towards the line of scrimmage -- intermediate routes will put them back on their heels again. Walsh also believed that you can run the score up early w/ the passing game, then run the clock out in the second half.

running the ball control the clock is for a team with an all around fantastic defense, that can do some scoring on their own. otherwise run run pass punt or run run run punt.
  • x49ersx123
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Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I think you are correct. With the pieces we have I think a passing offense to open up the running game is more appropriate then the running first offense. Think about following players we drafted. doesn’t it make sense for us to pass the ball a little more.

Alex Smith 1 pick overall
Frank Gore 3 round 1st pick
Vernon Davis 6 pick overall
Micheal Crabtree 10 pick overall
[ Edited by x49ersx123 on Oct 28, 2009 at 7:08 AM ]
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I disagree with your initial premise. If you CAN run the ball effectively and control the clock, it is ABSOLUTELY a winning formula. However, we (the 49ers) cannot do that and there are many supporting elements to an effective ball-control running game.

What you need is an effective deep and intermediate ball threat. This will serve as a deterrent to defenders crowding the line of scrimmage -- not just counting men in the box. If a SS or ILB is 1 - 2 yards further away from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped -- because he doesn't want to get beat deep by a WR or TE -- that could mean 1 - 2 extra yards on a run play (or more).

I put intermediate ball as well because there are ways to counter a team with a deep threat and a good running game: Cover 2. Cover 2 takes away the deep ball and stops the run...and dares the other team to find receivers in traffic over the middle. An offense needs a good TE or physical WRs that aren't afraid to go over the middle.

I think we have the potential for an excellent intermediate game, with two solid TEs and a #1 WR (Crabtree) who will pull in the ball over the middle, take a hit, and hold on. Brandon Jones needs to step up for the deep game to develop.

One final point -- Bill Walsh demonstrated that you do not need to have an effective running game in order to control the clock and stretch a defense vertically. A quick-hit passing game will consume clock and draw defenders towards the line of scrimmage -- intermediate routes will put them back on their heels again. Walsh also believed that you can run the score up early w/ the passing game, then run the clock out in the second half.

running the ball control the clock is for a team with an all around fantastic defense, that can do some scoring on their own. otherwise run run pass punt or run run run punt.

If you CAN run the ball every down, you should.

If you averaged 5 yards a carry with a low standard deviation from the mean carry (i.e. most runs are clustered around 5 yards -- not a lot of 10 yarders and 0 yarders), you should run until the defense makes you do otherwise.

Cleary, we cannot do that with our lack of talent at the guard positions. so, we need to start passing the ball in order to open things up for Gore. If we can get 7 men in the box w/ a 3WR/1TE single-back set (which could be our new base package), Gore will have a one-on-one situation with a linebacker. That's either a nice carry (4 - 6 yards) or a big run.

Speaking of the 3 WR, single-back set -- Crabtree (from what I've read) is a fantastic downfield blocker. If you put him in the slot on the strong side vs. an 8-man front, Gore will get one-on-one.
If you run the ball succesfully and have a decent defense then it is a proven theory that works. If you are missing either, like we are missing the run, then it doesn't work.

That formula is basic football knowledge.
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I disagree with your initial premise. If you CAN run the ball effectively and control the clock, it is ABSOLUTELY a winning formula. However, we (the 49ers) cannot do that and there are many supporting elements to an effective ball-control running game.

What you need is an effective deep and intermediate ball threat. This will serve as a deterrent to defenders crowding the line of scrimmage -- not just counting men in the box. If a SS or ILB is 1 - 2 yards further away from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped -- because he doesn't want to get beat deep by a WR or TE -- that could mean 1 - 2 extra yards on a run play (or more).

I put intermediate ball as well because there are ways to counter a team with a deep threat and a good running game: Cover 2. Cover 2 takes away the deep ball and stops the run...and dares the other team to find receivers in traffic over the middle. An offense needs a good TE or physical WRs that aren't afraid to go over the middle.

I think we have the potential for an excellent intermediate game, with two solid TEs and a #1 WR (Crabtree) who will pull in the ball over the middle, take a hit, and hold on. Brandon Jones needs to step up for the deep game to develop.

One final point -- Bill Walsh demonstrated that you do not need to have an effective running game in order to control the clock and stretch a defense vertically. A quick-hit passing game will consume clock and draw defenders towards the line of scrimmage -- intermediate routes will put them back on their heels again. Walsh also believed that you can run the score up early w/ the passing game, then run the clock out in the second half.

running the ball control the clock is for a team with an all around fantastic defense, that can do some scoring on their own. otherwise run run pass punt or run run run punt.


I disagree. To run the ball succesfull there has to be a dominant Offensive Line. I.E. The Giants. The Line has to be able to crate a push on the point of attack, which our line is not capable off.

Also the team needs a go to receiver to strech the field with a QB who is able to make those throws. Right now we did not have any of those.

Teams do not respect our passing ( how could they ) so they stack the box and our line is unable to open holes result 3&out
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I think that's exactly what they did in the second half of the Houston game. In fact, all year Raye has shown that he can call a pretty good passing attack, but up until last week it was only when he needed to. Now that we've shown that (with Alex), we can spread the ball around SUCCESSFULLY, maybe things will be different on offense from here on out. Sing even alluded to such during his Monday presser.

...We'll see.
Originally posted by miked1978:
If you run the ball succesfully and have a decent defense then it is a proven theory that works. If you are missing either, like we are missing the run, then it doesn't work.

That formula is basic football knowledge.

Thank you Mike -- great point. If you can run, you should run. However, many teams (like ours) do not have an o-line good enough to be able to run first. So, we have to use the pass to set up the run.
Originally posted by baltien:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I think that's exactly what they did in the second half of the Houston game. In fact, all year Raye has shown that he can call a pretty good passing attack, but up until last week it was only when he needed to. Now that we've shown that (with Alex), we can spread the ball around SUCCESSFULLY, maybe things will be different on offense from here on out. Sing even alluded to such during his Monday presser.

...We'll see.

Sing & Raye have finally broken down and conceded the fact that they must pass in order to set up the run.

It happens that way sometimes. Keep passing until safeties and/or linebackers are on their heels or back up a few yards -- then run.

Also keep an eye on how much of a cushion DBs are giving our WRs. If they're giving a big cushion -- run off-tackle!
Originally posted by JeuSF49:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Originally posted by nickbradley:
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?

I disagree with your initial premise. If you CAN run the ball effectively and control the clock, it is ABSOLUTELY a winning formula. However, we (the 49ers) cannot do that and there are many supporting elements to an effective ball-control running game.

What you need is an effective deep and intermediate ball threat. This will serve as a deterrent to defenders crowding the line of scrimmage -- not just counting men in the box. If a SS or ILB is 1 - 2 yards further away from the line of scrimmage when the ball is snapped -- because he doesn't want to get beat deep by a WR or TE -- that could mean 1 - 2 extra yards on a run play (or more).

I put intermediate ball as well because there are ways to counter a team with a deep threat and a good running game: Cover 2. Cover 2 takes away the deep ball and stops the run...and dares the other team to find receivers in traffic over the middle. An offense needs a good TE or physical WRs that aren't afraid to go over the middle.

I think we have the potential for an excellent intermediate game, with two solid TEs and a #1 WR (Crabtree) who will pull in the ball over the middle, take a hit, and hold on. Brandon Jones needs to step up for the deep game to develop.

One final point -- Bill Walsh demonstrated that you do not need to have an effective running game in order to control the clock and stretch a defense vertically. A quick-hit passing game will consume clock and draw defenders towards the line of scrimmage -- intermediate routes will put them back on their heels again. Walsh also believed that you can run the score up early w/ the passing game, then run the clock out in the second half.

running the ball control the clock is for a team with an all around fantastic defense, that can do some scoring on their own. otherwise run run pass punt or run run run punt.


I disagree. To run the ball succesfull there has to be a dominant Offensive Line. I.E. The Giants. The Line has to be able to crate a push on the point of attack, which our line is not capable off.

Also the team needs a go to receiver to strech the field with a QB who is able to make those throws. Right now we did not have any of those.

Teams do not respect our passing ( how could they ) so they stack the box and our line is unable to open holes result 3&out

As far as the running game goes, we've also been making poor choices with regards to our formation. With a 2-TE/single-back set -- or a 1 TE, 2 RB set, the defense will put a minimum of 8 men in the box, regardless of how much they respect the pass.

As a result, the LOS is so congested Gore cannot find a hole.
Originally posted by insanemike27:
Is a load of crap. That is a losing formula, now that we all know since we all had to witness it this year. It works well for a few weeks until the defense starts to grind down and lose it's breaks and that's when the whole team seems to start to fall apart.

Here is my philosophy. It's a pass to set up the run type of scheme so here me out.

When the offense gains possession of the ball, they start by spreading the defense out. The offense can either run the ball on first down or pass the ball on first down, mix it up. This will make the defense play more honest. They will be forced to play the run or pass even though we're in a passing formation. I'm talking four wide and a running back, run the ball. the defense has to account for the 4wr set. Use this formation periodically, mixing run with pass. Set up in a three wide one tight end and a running back formation. Have a full back or tightend spread out and show pass and than motion him in for a run the first time you use it and pass the second time you use it or vice versa. the qb has to make a few shots down field while in their own territory.

The second part of this formula is when you do get deep into the opponents territory switch everything up. Go to more of a running style offense. two tightends and a running back or two running backs and a tightend. Keep with the same strategy though, mix the runs with the passes. The idea is to keep the defense off balance. Cause even if you get in to scoring position fairly quickly you can still control the clock by running more in the redzone. If you get into scoring position with a couple of big plays on two or three of your drives during the game this will put emense pressure on the opposing defense. If they are worried about giving up a twenty or thirty yard passing strike, you should be able to run all over them. But if your showing them run packages in the redzone and they start to play the run than set up a long passing strike in the end zone, make them back off and keep them on their toes. This is how you out coach a team, this is a great formula to run with the type of playmakers we have. Not to mention a qb that can run this offense with no problem.

what do the rest of you think?
I can't wait to see what this offense can do now that we will be able to stretch the field.