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The Route Tree

Everyone is talking about now, from Cosell's article, to the Article about Crabtree playing 12-15 snaps.

Not having played High School Football (at Polk High much less), what is it other than a listing of the routes? Slant, Go, Curl, etc.

Forgive my naivete but this seems to be the "new" cool buzzword.

Is one team's route tree the same as another's?
Originally posted by wysiwyg:
Everyone is talking about now, from Cosell's article, to the Article about Crabtree playing 12-15 snaps.

Not having played High School Football (at Polk High much less), what is it other than a listing of the routes? Slant, Go, Curl, etc.

Forgive my naivete but this seems to be the "new" cool buzzword.

Is one team's route tree the same as another's?

Alright I'm going to give this a shot:
Route Tree has all the basic routes, reads etc that a WR runs
Example some plays may have routes that the WR needs to read the D and decide which direction he will run the route/whether he will run a go or a slant/when/if he will break the route.
Kind of like each play has a primary route then you can branch off the tree based on reads etc
Route trees by my understanding are basically the same with some different variations think of it like the west coast offense same basic philosophy but different HC/OC's may call it different or have their own variation of it.

Did the best I could man I hope that helps.
  • krizay
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 14,924


Quote:
The Passing Tree is a numbered system used for the passing routes.

The passing tree system is designed so that all even-numbered routes (2,4,6,8) are run towards the middle of the field and all odd-numbered routes (1,3,5,7,9) are be run towards the sideline.

These routes are used for all positions on the field.

The running back has extra routes that are always be referred to by name.

Since the ball is always placed in the middle of the field, the center faces the dilemma, and all of the center’s routes should be based on the play design.

Quote:
Passing Tree Receiver Route Definitions
Quick Out (1): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver cuts out towards the sideline then looks for the ball.
Slant (2): This is a 3-5 yard route forward then the receiver breaks towards the middle of the filed on a 45 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Deep Out (3): This is a 10-15 yard route. It should be run exactly like the quick out only deeper.
Drag/In (4): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver breaks into the middle of the filed on a 90 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Flag (5): This is a 10-15 yard route forward then the receiver breaks at a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and looks for the ball.
Curl (6): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver stops and turns to the ball.
Post Corner (7): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle to the middle of the field for a few steps then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and then looks for the ball.
Post (8): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver breaks on a 45 degree angle towards the middle of the field and looks for the ball.
Fly (9): This route is run straight up the field with the receiver looking for the ball after he gets past about 15 yards.
[ Edited by krizay on Oct 18, 2009 at 2:13 PM ]
Originally posted by krizay:


Quote:
The Passing Tree is a numbered system used for the passing routes.

The passing tree system is designed so that all even-numbered routes (2,4,6,8) are run towards the middle of the field and all odd-numbered routes (1,3,5,7,9) are be run towards the sideline.

These routes are used for all positions on the field.

The running back has extra routes that are always be referred to by name.

Since the ball is always placed in the middle of the field, the center faces the dilemma, and all of the center’s routes should be based on the play design.

Quote:
Passing Tree Receiver Route Definitions
Quick Out (1): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver cuts out towards the sideline then looks for the ball.
Slant (2): This is a 3-5 yard route forward then the receiver breaks towards the middle of the filed on a 45 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Deep Out (3): This is a 10-15 yard route. It should be run exactly like the quick out only deeper.
Drag/In (4): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver breaks into the middle of the filed on a 90 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Flag (5): This is a 10-15 yard route forward then the receiver breaks at a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and looks for the ball.
Curl (6): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver stops and turns to the ball.
Post Corner (7): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle to the middle of the field for a few steps then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and then looks for the ball.
Post (8): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver breaks on a 45 degree angle towards the middle of the field and looks for the ball.
Fly (9): This route is run straight up the field with the receiver looking for the ball after he gets past about 15 yards.

great post. that image is
it's cool to see them aligned like that
Most helpful to me as well.
Thanks a lot!!
  • Wiseman
  • Info N/A
Why don't people even do a simple search to educate themselves before asking a question?

Found a number of images on google that explain the "route tree".

As for his second question, about different tree's for different teams, that seems to be a viable question. Having spent about 30 seconds on google I believe that the answer is no, there are simply only so many routes that can logically be ran so all teams would have the same route tree. Some may limit that tree to fewer branches for certain players but basically that is it.
Originally posted by Wiseman:
Why don't people even do a simple search to educate themselves before asking a question?

Found a number of images on google that explain the "route tree".

As for his second question, about different tree's for different teams, that seems to be a viable question. Having spent about 30 seconds on google I believe that the answer is no, there are simply only so many routes that can logically be ran so all teams would have the same route tree. Some may limit that tree to fewer branches for certain players but basically that is it.

wow. wake up on the wrong side of the bed?
  • Wiseman
  • Info N/A
Originally posted by chico49erfan:
Originally posted by Wiseman:
Why don't people even do a simple search to educate themselves before asking a question?

Found a number of images on google that explain the "route tree".

As for his second question, about different tree's for different teams, that seems to be a viable question. Having spent about 30 seconds on google I believe that the answer is no, there are simply only so many routes that can logically be ran so all teams would have the same route tree. Some may limit that tree to fewer branches for certain players but basically that is it.

wow. wake up on the wrong side of the bed?

Not at all, actually been a pretty good day. Laziness just bothers me.
Originally posted by krizay:


Quote:
The Passing Tree is a numbered system used for the passing routes.

The passing tree system is designed so that all even-numbered routes (2,4,6,8) are run towards the middle of the field and all odd-numbered routes (1,3,5,7,9) are be run towards the sideline.

These routes are used for all positions on the field.

The running back has extra routes that are always be referred to by name.

Since the ball is always placed in the middle of the field, the center faces the dilemma, and all of the center’s routes should be based on the play design.

Quote:
Passing Tree Receiver Route Definitions
Quick Out (1): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver cuts out towards the sideline then looks for the ball.
Slant (2): This is a 3-5 yard route forward then the receiver breaks towards the middle of the filed on a 45 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Deep Out (3): This is a 10-15 yard route. It should be run exactly like the quick out only deeper.
Drag/In (4): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver breaks into the middle of the filed on a 90 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Flag (5): This is a 10-15 yard route forward then the receiver breaks at a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and looks for the ball.
Curl (6): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver stops and turns to the ball.
Post Corner (7): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle to the middle of the field for a few steps then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and then looks for the ball.
Post (8): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver breaks on a 45 degree angle towards the middle of the field and looks for the ball.
Fly (9): This route is run straight up the field with the receiver looking for the ball after he gets past about 15 yards.

That image is missing one.

^
|
|
_
|
|
|

*Edit* sputid code system mucked up a simple out in up pattern. Needs forward and back slashes.*

That being the hitch and go. I think there are a couple of others that are missing as well but it's a great tool for young players looking for a basis on which to run their routes. Kinda wish that I had the Internet and that chart when I played.

~Ceadder
[ Edited by Ceadderman on Oct 18, 2009 at 6:56 PM ]
Originally posted by Wiseman:
Originally posted by chico49erfan:
Originally posted by Wiseman:
Why don't people even do a simple search to educate themselves before asking a question?

Found a number of images on google that explain the "route tree".

As for his second question, about different tree's for different teams, that seems to be a viable question. Having spent about 30 seconds on google I believe that the answer is no, there are simply only so many routes that can logically be ran so all teams would have the same route tree. Some may limit that tree to fewer branches for certain players but basically that is it.

wow. wake up on the wrong side of the bed?

Not at all, actually been a pretty good day. Laziness just bothers me.

This is one of the best threads going in NT, IMO. It actually covers something that's interesting and something that hasn't been beaten into the ground. Besides, WhoTF needs google when you have the WZ?
Originally posted by Wiseman:
Why don't people even do a simple search to educate themselves before asking a question?

Found a number of images on google that explain the "route tree".

As for his second question, about different tree's for different teams, that seems to be a viable question. Having spent about 30 seconds on google I believe that the answer is no, there are simply only so many routes that can logically be ran so all teams would have the same route tree. Some may limit that tree to fewer branches for certain players but basically that is it.
Maybe some fans would rather communicate with other Niner fans. Also, I'll bet a few responders were glad to have a chance to share their football info. If some one doesn't want to take the time to answer, they don't. It's free country brother.
[ Edited by stevenking57 on Oct 18, 2009 at 7:23 PM ]
Here's another link that adds a little to this topic...

http://www.footballtimes.org/Article.asp?ID=125
Originally posted by Ceadderman:
Originally posted by krizay:


Quote:
The Passing Tree is a numbered system used for the passing routes.

The passing tree system is designed so that all even-numbered routes (2,4,6,8) are run towards the middle of the field and all odd-numbered routes (1,3,5,7,9) are be run towards the sideline.

These routes are used for all positions on the field.

The running back has extra routes that are always be referred to by name.

Since the ball is always placed in the middle of the field, the center faces the dilemma, and all of the center’s routes should be based on the play design.

Quote:
Passing Tree Receiver Route Definitions
Quick Out (1): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver cuts out towards the sideline then looks for the ball.
Slant (2): This is a 3-5 yard route forward then the receiver breaks towards the middle of the filed on a 45 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Deep Out (3): This is a 10-15 yard route. It should be run exactly like the quick out only deeper.
Drag/In (4): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver breaks into the middle of the filed on a 90 degree angle and looks for the ball.
Flag (5): This is a 10-15 yard route forward then the receiver breaks at a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and looks for the ball.
Curl (6): This is a 5-8 yard route forward then the receiver stops and turns to the ball.
Post Corner (7): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle to the middle of the field for a few steps then the receiver cuts on a 45 degree angle towards the sideline and then looks for the ball.
Post (8): This is a 12-20 yard route forward then the receiver breaks on a 45 degree angle towards the middle of the field and looks for the ball.
Fly (9): This route is run straight up the field with the receiver looking for the ball after he gets past about 15 yards.

That image is missing one.

^
|
|
_
|
|
|

*Edit* sputid code system mucked up a simple out in up pattern. Needs forward and back slashes.*

That being the hitch and go. I think there are a couple of others that are missing as well but it's a great tool for young players looking for a basis on which to run their routes. Kinda wish that I had the Internet and that chart when I played.

~Ceadder


yeah that is a great one.

are screens, out/hitch/slant n go's a part of the route tree? or would they just be called a 1/2/etc n go?