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More proof that NFL refs are very biased in calling games.

Originally posted by boast:

This is what drives me crazy. Kaepernick & other quarterbacks get tackled this way all the time, but if they are not a top 4 quarterback there is no flag.
Originally posted by boast:

/thread
I don't think the NFL is rigged at WWE levels, but I do think that someone higher up in the NFL has major sway and influence on the way the game is played/called. It also comes down to what an individual ref wants to call. You can't tell me that a ref wouldn't be biased on a call because he's tired of Harbaugh breathing down his neck.
Cam Newtown was spitting blood after a no call helmet-to-helmet hit.
Kuechly gets another no-call in the endzone
Originally posted by IronSaint:
Originally posted by ECLaloosh:
Originally posted by boast:

That's about the best argument a person can make right there.

Not exactly, Kaepernick wasn't a "defenseless player" (ie. a QB in the pocket) since he had the ball tucked and was an established runner at that point. The only thing that could've been called was a facemask IF Akiem Hicks would've grabbed it.

The league continues to stress that the idea is to protect the quarterback (because nobody wants to watch the backups play), look at the photo of Kaep.. and it's clear that he's not being "protected" by the NFL. Inside or outside of the pocket, if wrapping around the neck is a penalty, then hell.. Kaep was strangled.

The fact is that the NFL isn't interested in protecting the quarterback, they're interested in protecting Bree's, Brady, Payton, and Rodgers.
Originally posted by ModestoNiner33:
Kuechly gets another no-call in the endzone

I saw that. Refs threw the flag at first, then picked it up.

I swear these clowns never get it right. They always find a way to screw it up.
Ok, that Keuchly play was absurd. Now, it's official that NFC South teams must be the darlings of the league. The saints get everything, and Carolina now gets away with a blatant helmet to helmet hit that should be flagged for any defensive player on the field anywhere. Absolutely crazy. Then, the Panthers get a gift 15 yards on the game winning drive when Newton slips out of bounds and draws a 15 yard unsportsmanlike penalty on the dolphin defender, who was trying to hold him up.

This is ridiculous. Can someone post the Keuchly hit? Anybody who hasn't seen it won't believe it didn't get a call.
Originally posted by brodiebluebanaszak:
Ok, that Keuchly play was absurd. Now, it's official that NFC South teams must be the darlings of the league. The saints get everything, and Carolina now gets away with a blatant helmet to helmet hit that should be flagged for any defensive player on the field anywhere. Absolutely crazy. Then, the Panthers get a gift 15 yards on the game winning drive when Newton slips out of bounds and draws a 15 yard unsportsmanlike penalty on the dolphin defender, who was trying to hold him up.

This is ridiculous. Can someone post the Keuchly hit? Anybody who hasn't seen it won't believe it didn't get a call.

Even if it wasn't a helmet to helmet hit (which I have no doubt it was) what happened to the defenseless receiver call? The receiver clearly wasn't in a position to protect himself. Any receiver extended like that going for the catch, who gets hit, almost universally draws a flag now. I recall Whitner getting flagged on a play that was virtually identical, with the exception of Whitner never hitting the guy in the head or leading with the crown of his helmet.
Anyone see that clotheline hit to Jason Campbell's neck that knocked him out of the game today? No flag on the Steelers.
Originally posted by qnnhan7:
OK, but Williams must've said or did something to warrant be called "a garbage ass disrespectful mother(expletive)"

A person just don't go off on another person unless something egregious happened. Players may say all kinda s**t to the ref and expect them to be OK with it. They are human beings too.

they are zebras
Originally posted by brodiebluebanaszak:
Ok, that Keuchly play was absurd. Now, it's official that NFC South teams must be the darlings of the league. The saints get everything, and Carolina now gets away with a blatant helmet to helmet hit that should be flagged for any defensive player on the field anywhere. Absolutely crazy. Then, the Panthers get a gift 15 yards on the game winning drive when Newton slips out of bounds and draws a 15 yard unsportsmanlike penalty on the dolphin defender, who was trying to hold him up.

This is ridiculous. Can someone post the Keuchly hit? Anybody who hasn't seen it won't believe it didn't get a call.

he was draped all over Gronk, it looked like he was trying to dry-hump him
Don't know if already posted or in another thread but did you guys see the hit on Campbell in the Pittsburgh/ browns game. Way worse then the brooks play and even injured Campbell too
The National Football League's feigned indignation about gambling is a joke. A conservative estimate is that $80 billion to $100 billion is wagered on NFL games each year, only a fraction legally.

In the early 1920s, one George Halas turned to Charles Bidwill, a bootlegger, gambler, racetrack owner, and associate of Chicago's Al (Scarface) Capone's mob, to finance the Chicago Bears. Later, Bidwill bought the Chicago Cardinals. The Bidwill family now owns the Arizona Cardinals.

In 1925, bookie Tim Mara bought the New York Giants. His heirs still have half the team. Notorious gambler Art Rooney took over the Pittsburgh Steelers. His family still controls the team; the Rooney empire is purportedly breaking up so that the racetracks and casinos won't be mixed with the football team.

In the sport's first half-century, one team after another was owned by high rollers, often with sordid connections. The Cleveland Browns were owned by crime syndicate bookmaker Arthur (Mickey) McBride, head of the Continental Racing Wire, the mob's gambling news service. The U.S. Senate's Kefauver Committee called that news service "Public Enemy Number One."

In 1961, the team was sold to Art Modell, who, among many things, was a partner in a horse-racing stable with one Morris (Mushy) Wexler, whom the Kefauver Committee named one of the "leading hoodlums" in McBride's wire service. In 1969, Modell got married in the Las Vegas digs of William (Billy) Weinberger, president of Caesars Palace, whose hidden owners included such dignitaries as Tony (Big Tuna) Accardo, Sam (Momo) Giancana, and Vincent (Jimmy Blue Eyes) Alo. When he died in 1996, the Las Vegas Sun called Weinberger "the dean of casino gaming."

The late Carroll Rosenbloom, a high roller with a major interest in a mobbed-up Bahamian casino, owned the Baltimore Colts and Los Angeles Rams at different times. His second wife and widow, entertainer Georgia Frontiere — who had been married five times before latching on to Rosenbloom — inherited control of the Rams and moved them to St. Louis when she got a stadium 96 percent funded by taxpayers.

The Chargers were founded by longtime gambler Barron Hilton, who had both a business and personal relationship with Los Angeles attorney Sidney Korshak, who was described by law enforcement officials as "the link between the legitimate business world and organized crime."
http://www.sandiegoreader.com/news/2012/jul/04/citylights1-nfl-dirty-secret/
The Goat Bowl February 7, 2012 The Super Bowl is over, the New York Giants won, and I can't be the only person who noticed something odd: the last three games of the season were all decided by goats.

It's mighty doggone suspicious. Whoever polices the NFL against game fixing should be investigating full steam, because something awfully weird was going on during the last two rounds of the playoffs.

Here's the thing: the only two ways to fix games is to subvert the officials or pay the players to perform badly. (They're already being paid to perform well, so that would be a waste of money.) Consequently, one of the first signs that something is amiss will be unexpected and inexplicably bone-headed blunders on the field. Exactly like what we saw in these last three games.

Maybe those were clues.
I have no concrete evidence that anybody was on the take in the NFL. How could I? All I'm saying is that what did happen, right there in front of our eyes, well, it defies the odds. You can watch a whole season of NFL football without seeing one 4th quarter obviously-game-losing mistake of the magnitude we saw two and three at a time at the end of these three games.

Game 1, Baltimore Ravens at New England Patriots (winner goes to Super Bowl)
Ravens quarterback Joe Flacco threw a perfect pass to Lee Evans in the end zone for the game-winning score, and Evans caught it, but he didn't put the ball away fast enough so a Patriot stripped it... game losing mistake number one. After another incomplete pass, the kicker came in to tie the game with a point-blank field goal but missed the 32-yarder wide left. Game losing mistake number two. (Both in the last 27 seconds of the game.)

Game 2, New York Giants at San Francisco 49ers (winner goes to Super Bowl)

It felt to me that the 49ers were the better team throughout the game, slowly wearing the Giants down with overpowering defense, and with 11 minutes 17 seconds left they were leading 14-10 when the Giants finished another futile effort at moving the ball by punting, their fifth straight possession ending with a punt. The 49ers defense was dominating the Giants offense. Inexplicably, the man fielding the punt for the 49ers, Kyle Williams, didn't catch the ball but stayed in the vicinity, allowing the ball to bounce off his knee which made it a live ball. The Giants grabbed it. Game losing mistake number three. The grateful Giants offense, rejuvenated, trotted back onto the field and scored a touchdown 2 minutes and 36 seconds later. Giants 17-14. The 49ers kicked a field goal to send the game into overtime but 5 minutes 18 seconds into overtime the Giants punted to Kyle Williams (again), who caught the ball and fumbled it back to the Giants on the 24 yard line. Game losing mistake number four. (Both by the same guy.) The Giants kicked a field goal to win the game.

Game 3, New England Patriots vs. New York Giants (Super Bowl)
Tom Brady threw a deep pass to Wes Welker who was wide open on the 20 yard line. Known for his good hands, Welker let the ball bounce off his hands. Game losing mistake number five. Instead of first down at the 20, the Patriots had to punt the ball to the Giants who marched down the field and scored a touchdown. The Patriots got the ball back and made a desperate drive with 57 seconds to go, but two more sure-handed Patriots receivers dropped passes that hit them in the hands. Game losing mistakes number six and number seven. (All by receivers.) The Patriots failed to score and lost 21-17.

Notice that all three games were ultimately won by the team that seemed weaker during the game. Looking back at the Giants two victories, they scored a total of 41 points: 3 after the first Kyle Williams punt fumble, 7 after the second Kyle Williams punt fumble, 2 after an intentional grounding call on Tom Brady after a pass up the middle that traveled 50 yards in the air (an unheard-of call), 7 after they fumbled the ball away but the Patriots had 12 men on the field, and 7 after Wes Welker dropped a pass that hit him in the hands. So 26 of their 41 points came after weird, unlikely scenarios.

It could be a fluke of statistics that so many blunders happened at the tail end of the three most important games in the NFL season, when all the gambling money is on the line and the incentive for skullduggery is greatest. It could be. Coincidence happens.

But somebody once said, "Coincidence is the word we use when we can't see the levers and pulleys."

http://www.jpattitude.com/120207.php