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Will football become ghettoized

Originally posted by SanDiego49er:
Originally posted by NickSh49:
You guys are missing the point completely.

What he means is that it will become like boxing... as in if you participate in the sport of boxing, you're putting your life at risk.

He is 100% right in that sense. Football is getting WAY more violent, and there is more risk in playing.

Where he is wrong is that the sport isn't going to lose popularity because of this whatsoever.

Football is becoming less violent. It will be flag football within 5 years.

Disagree. The rules are trying to make the game less violent, but players are much bigger & faster now and that's only going to continue with advances in training techniques and workout supplements. Players have the ability to get bigger and faster at a greater rate than in the 70's, 80's, and so forth.

Concussions & injuries will persist. The point of the article is that football is no longer considered a "fun, safe sport" for your children to play with their friends. You now take a major risk if you decide to play football into high school and beyond. Part of that is how fast and violent the game is, and part of that is our growing knowledge of what the spot does to your body.
@NickSh49

I don't think American football has EVER been considered a "fun, safe sport for your children to play with their friends," but I could be wrong about that with respect to some areas of the country. But, I think one has to remember that there are hundreds of billions invested in this sport. The NFL absolutely WILL find a way for it to become less dangerous to the body even if it involves eventually going back to soft helmets and forcing players to tackle with their arms and shoulders the way they used to in the 30's and 40's - more like rugby tackling. Corporations, billionaires and communities have spent billions putting up stadiums. The NFL, with just 16 games and a few playoffs, had a revenue of about $9.5 billion last year. The NBA, with 82 games and playoffs, barely topped out at $4 billion in revenue. Even Division 1 college football beat the NBA with revenue of $5.3 billion. There is just too much money involved here for corporations and billionaires to let the thing die because too many players are getting hurt. They'll be willing to sacrifice a little market share for a tamer game in the end. It's all about the money.
as long as texas is around football is going nowhere
Originally posted by NickSh49:
Disagree. The rules are trying to make the game less violent, but players are much bigger & faster now and that's only going to continue with advances in training techniques and workout supplements. Players have the ability to get bigger and faster at a greater rate than in the 70's, 80's, and so forth.

Concussions & injuries will persist. The point of the article is that football is no longer considered a "fun, safe sport" for your children to play with their friends. You now take a major risk if you decide to play football into high school and beyond. Part of that is how fast and violent the game is, and part of that is our growing knowledge of what the spot does to your body.


Here's a thought: Everyone already knew how awful football is on your body, and nobody cared. Still we don't care. I dislocated my shoulder three times playing in the state championship in high school, and I still played. Cortizone brother. Hallelujah. Players just pray it doesnt happen to them, and keep on hitting.
Originally posted by xtm059:
Originally posted by NickSh49:
Disagree. The rules are trying to make the game less violent, but players are much bigger & faster now and that's only going to continue with advances in training techniques and workout supplements. Players have the ability to get bigger and faster at a greater rate than in the 70's, 80's, and so forth.

Concussions & injuries will persist. The point of the article is that football is no longer considered a "fun, safe sport" for your children to play with their friends. You now take a major risk if you decide to play football into high school and beyond. Part of that is how fast and violent the game is, and part of that is our growing knowledge of what the spot does to your body.


Here's a thought: Everyone already knew how awful football is on your body, and nobody cared. Still we don't care. I dislocated my shoulder three times playing in the state championship in high school, and I still played. Cortizone brother. Hallelujah. Players just pray it doesnt happen to them, and keep on hitting.

From a player's standpoint, you are absolutely correct.

From the public's standpoint, I disagree. The danger is more real and immediate now. The sport is very young, and the danger of the game is now at the forefront of the public's eye.

BUT... will that change anything regarding the popularity of the sport? Nope. I just think the "innocence" of the game is dwindling in the eyes of the public. Yes, football has always been a rough sport, but now when a guy gets his bell rung, people watching at home are wondering about his brain instead of saying, "he's just shaken up."
what you talkin about willis
Originally posted by NickSh49:
From a player's standpoint, you are absolutely correct.

From the public's standpoint, I disagree. The danger is more real and immediate now. The sport is very young, and the danger of the game is now at the forefront of the public's eye.

BUT... will that change anything regarding the popularity of the sport? Nope. I just think the "innocence" of the game is dwindling in the eyes of the public. Yes, football has always been a rough sport, but now when a guy gets his bell rung, people watching at home are wondering about his brain instead of saying, "he's just shaken up."

It's kind of sad to say, but the violence and danger might actually enhance the spectator popularity of the sport. That's why I say the owners might eventually be willing to sacrifice some ratings to cut down on their potential losses through lawsuits. But honestly, I think the ship has sailed a long time ago as far as the "innocence" of the game in both the pros and college. It's big business and everyone knows it. NFL revenue was $9.5 billion and Division I college was $5.3 billion in 2012. That's huge business.