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Is the NFL ready for an Openly Gay Player

Is the NFL ready for an Openly Gay Player

Originally posted by Marvin49:
Originally posted by DelCed2486:
Originally posted by Marvin49:
Originally posted by DelCed2486:
Originally posted by Marvin49:
Originally posted by DelCed2486:
Originally posted by Marvin49:
Originally posted by SammyFrancisco:
Originally posted by baltien:
And what boundary would that be?

Did I miss something where a gay player was booted off a team because of his sexual preferences?

While we're talking about it, can you tell me of ONE known obstacle that prevents a gay player from coming out if they so choose (and not your assumptions)? Is being gay a violation of your contract? Will it result in you being immediately released? Thrown in jail? Publicly cained maybe?

No? Then, what exactly are we talking about here?
The fact that no player in any of the big 4 sports leagues has never been openly gay proves that obstacles exist. No doubt some of these obstacles are social. Players like John Amechi and Kwame Harris, who have become open about being gay after their careers, have testified to the difficulties of living with the secret in the less-than-accepting sports culture.

But it's possible being openly gay would also affect players in terms of their career. Why else would NFL teams care to inquire about the sexual orientation of potential draftees? See - Nick Kasa's comments about teams asking him if he liked girls in Combine interviews.


Don't bother.

They aren't gonna budge. I wasted a few hours this afternoon on it.


Perish the thought someone has a dissenting opinion from yours I guess.


Oh please.

Get off the soapbox. Everyone is entitled to a differing opinion. Thats the entire point of the forum. They have a right to believe what they believe just as I do and I have the right to advise another poster not to try to change their minds because it's a wasted effort.

They could very easily say the same of me.

Soapbox? Pot, kettle.


Seriously? THAT's your response? Sad.

What was that you said about dissenting opinions? RIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIGHT.

Merely pointing out the irony of you saying I'm the one on a soapbox. Yes, perhaps it is sad...sorry it did not live up to your expectations.


Its OK. I'll get over it.

My wife of 20+ years has said that a million times. And she lies every time. Well okay, to be fair, she didn't so much say it as I told her to get over it, but still...

But you're a dude so I believe you.
Is the NFL ready? Of course not. That's the point of coming out. Push the issue. Force people to deal with it.
Originally posted by baltien:
Originally posted by SammyFrancisco:
No, gay players choosing to keep their orientation out of the public eye does not make them bad people. And It's true that a player coming out might cause a media distraction that could be detrimental to the team. But that itself is the problem. The cause is not "trivial" as you say. If it was, why would the Supreme Court address the constitutionality of state's denying same-sex marriage in our country? Why would players like Brendon Ayanbadejo and Chris Kluwe campaign tirelessly to combat homophobia in NFL locker rooms? Someone will have to be the first to come out in order to break the boundary for others in the future.

And what boundary would that be?

Did I miss something where a gay player was booted off a team because of his sexual preferences?

While we're talking about it, can you tell me of ONE known obstacle that prevents a gay player from coming out if they so choose (and not your assumptions)? Is being gay a violation of your contract? Will it result in you being immediately released? Thrown in jail? Publicly cained maybe?

No? Then, what exactly are we talking about here?

The lockeroom

Those guys get naked, shower, get dressed among other players. Those other players talk smack about everything from Brian Jennings shoes to the ride that the practice squad rookie is driving. A gay player would have to come out to the ridicule that they would receive from teammates, the opposing players, and the fans, and media.

The fact that it has not happened in professional sports yet means that the gay players believe that it IS a big deal, notwitstanding any tv shows to the contrary lol.

No one cares that Kwame is gay but ask if he felt he could come out in '03 as a rookie.

In the military, there are close quarters but the official policy is don't ask, don't tell. Gay marriage and the constitutionality of DOMA is before the US Supreme Court. What player is going to be the first, ala #42 in baseball. He faced scorn, ridicule, and the N word being the first.

The first openly gay player in a major sport WILL be a pioneer like Jackie Robinson, but for different reasons. Being black is obvious (duh). Being gay (unless you are a total flamer lol duh) is not.

This will be an issue until someone has the courage to break the color (rainbow) line
Originally posted by SammyFrancisco:
If I knew specifically what it might cost a player to come out as openly gay, I'd tell you, but that fact that no one has strongly suggests there would be consequences players would rather avoid. Presumably the consequences might be in the form of unwelcome distractions from the game; discrimination from teammates, coaches, and/or fans; and, possibly, financial consequences as well (from loss of sponsorships, lower draft position, things like that).

And yes, I'd venture that the NFL would come out on the side of anti-prostitution if pressed, but I don't think that's a very controversial position. The Dez Bryant thing is interesting, but it doesn't really have to do with institutional homophobia in sports.

You're right it doesn't. It was mentioned to point out that owners sometimes ask potential players stupid questions. One owner asking a guy about his sexual preferences does not equal institutional homophobia. Just as one owner asking if a guy's mother was a former prostitute does not equal institutional racism or sexism (as some have suggested). And you bet that next year it will be another owner asking another stupid question that will likely get him into trouble.

Guys opting to not come out during their career doesn't really prove or disprove anything either. Going back to Kwame Harris, only ONE person (Chris Culliver) said anything negative about it. So using your own logic, if homophobia was so pervasive in sports, wouldn't there have been tons of players chiming in about how grossed out they are to have shared a shower with Kwame? To date, I haven't heard one peep from any of his former teammates, which is very telling.

And for every Chris Culliver, I can name at least a half-dozen that would openly support a gay player. Point is, this is more media hype than anything.
Originally posted by wysiwyg:
The lockeroom

Those guys get naked, shower, get dressed among other players. Those other players talk smack about everything from Brian Jennings shoes to the ride that the practice squad rookie is driving. A gay player would have to come out to the ridicule that they would receive from teammates, the opposing players, and the fans, and media.

The fact that it has not happened in professional sports yet means that the gay players believe that it IS a big deal, notwitstanding any tv shows to the contrary lol.

No one cares that Kwame is gay but ask if he felt he could come out in '03 as a rookie.

In the military, there are close quarters but the official policy is don't ask, don't tell. Gay marriage and the constitutionality of DOMA is before the US Supreme Court. What player is going to be the first, ala #42 in baseball. He faced scorn, ridicule, and the N word being the first.

The first openly gay player in a major sport WILL be a pioneer like Jackie Robinson, but for different reasons. Being black is obvious (duh). Being gay (unless you are a total flamer lol duh) is not.

This will be an issue until someone has the courage to break the color (rainbow) line

1) The media WANTS to see a gay player, so whoever is the first to come out will likely be supported by them. Some fans and teammates may not like it, but I doubt it'd reach any kind of significant level.

2) I'm in the military and "Don't ask don't tell" has been wiped off the books for a little while now. But even before that was the case - as I'm sure many other military members here can attest to - there have always been some very obviously gay people enlisted.

Can't speak for anyone one else but during my travels, I know that nobody really gave a damn. If you were doing your job and weren't a dumbass most couldn't care less what you were doing behind closed doors.

The Pentagon even published a report plainly stating that repealing that ridiculous "rule" has had no ill effects on the military whatsoever.

Have a look for yourself:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/20/us/dont-ask-dont-tell-anniversary-passes-with-little-note.html?pagewanted=all

3) Again, please give the civil rights comparisons a rest. Whoever is the first gay NFL player to come out most assuredly will NOT face widespread boycotting by fans, being publicly called a slur to their face, and death threats as Jackie Robinson did. Truthfully, it pains me that we can't have this discussion without going there.

Yes, I acknowledge there may be some backlash (you can't totally erase bigotry after all) but in all likelihood it will just be a media story for a few weeks, before it gives way to some other non-issue.
[ Edited by baltien on Apr 15, 2013 at 4:59 AM ]
Originally posted by baltien:
1) The media WANTS to see a gay player, so whoever is the first to come out will likely be supported by them. Some fans and teammates may not like it, but I doubt it'd reach any kind of significant level.

2) I'm in the military and "Don't ask don't tell" has been wiped off the books for a little while now. But even before that was the case - as I'm sure many other military members here can attest to - there have always been some very obviously gay people enlisted.

Can't speak for anyone one else but during my travels, I know that nobody really gave a damn. If you were doing your job and weren't a dumbass most couldn't care less what you were doing behind closed doors.

The Pentagon even published a report plainly stating that repealing that ridiculous "rule" has had no ill effects on the military whatsoever.

Have a look for yourself:

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/09/20/us/dont-ask-dont-tell-anniversary-passes-with-little-note.html?pagewanted=all

3) Again, please give the civil rights comparisons a rest. Whoever is the first gay NFL player to come out most assuredly will NOT face widespread boycotting by fans, being publicly called a slur to their face, and death threats as Jackie Robinson did. Truthfully, it pains me that we can't have this discussion without going there.

Yes, I acknowledge there may be some backlash (you can't totally erase bigotry after all) but in all likelihood it will just be a media story for a few weeks, before it gives way to some other non-issue.


It also should be added that this player will more likely than not already be part of the locker room. When the guy comes out most of his teammates will have already known him for years and we'll see him as the person he is. To assume he's going to get a sh*t load of backlash remains to be seen. I really think the locker room's reaction to him being gay is the least of his problems.

No doubt opposing fan bases will act like idiots, and the guy will have to put up with a bunch of trash talk on the field, but some of that is the game. The biggest problem is if things don't go well his career could be cut short or it could cost him in contract negotiations. The guy could easily find himself in Tebow's shoes. Blacklisted because his talent doesn't equal the media circus that follows him.
So, nobdys gonna post the Kerry Rhodes article
Originally posted by JerryRice1848:
So, nobdys gonna post the Kerry Rhodes article

The one about the boyfriend outing Kerry? Dont know if its legit or not.
wish this would happen already so we can put it behind. Crazy though, to think that we're living a big part of history and we'll look back 30 years from now and remember when the changes were taking place
Originally posted by 5280High:
Originally posted by JerryRice1848:
So, nobdys gonna post the Kerry Rhodes article

The one about the boyfriend outing Kerry? Dont know if its legit or not.

http://cdn.mediatakeout.com/62309/mto-super-world-exclusive-we-ve-got-more-pics-of-nfl-star-kerry-rhodes-and-this-time-he-s-kissing-his-male-friend.html
Kerry Rhodes denied it but this will probably tell you why no one is interested in his services



http://blacksportsonline.com/home/2013/04/kerry-rhodes-gay-lover-speaks-i-was-like-his-wife-hes-passionate-lover-photos/?pid=9075
Originally posted by 49time:
Kerry Rhodes denied it but this will probably tell you why no one is interested in his services



http://blacksportsonline.com/home/2013/04/kerry-rhodes-gay-lover-speaks-i-was-like-his-wife-hes-passionate-lover-photos/?pid=9075


There's another reason why the media needs to f*** off with this. Unless someone actually wants to come forward it's nobodies business. You're putting players in position where their career's can be short, or they could be subject to blackmail.
[ Edited by tjd808185 on Apr 17, 2013 at 9:17 PM ]
Originally posted by tjd808185:
There's another reason why the media needs to f*** off with this. Unless someone actually wants to come forward it's nobodies business. You're putting players in position where their career's can be short, or they could be subject to blackmail.

Freedom of the press, unfortunatly
Very similar situation
1:20, then 3:10, then 4:10.

Owner forces lone pro bowl player to go on IR to cover up the "situation"
Then the NFL gets spooked and forces ESPN to pull the show after one season.
Originally posted by tjd808185:
There's another reason why the media needs to f*** off with this. Unless someone actually wants to come forward it's nobodies business. You're putting players in position where their career's can be short, or they could be subject to blackmail.

This. Regardless if this new report is legit or not, these guys have a right to live their lives the way they want.
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