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Dead guys Achilles being used to heal ACL injuries

RIP Akili's Heel
[ Edited by Dr_Bill_Walsh on Jul 11, 2012 at 6:16 AM ]
  • Chico
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 2,128
Originally posted by Doc9er:
Greetings! Although I'm not much for posting, I can contribute a little here... When handling a torn ligament such as the ACL, there are three general ideas:

1) You can leave it be and avoid extreme physical exertion on the area. In this case, the ACL will not grow back on its own and sports such as football are a terrible idea. Professional athletes almost always opt for treatment. That brings up the next two options

2) You can replace with you own tissue. In this case, you can harvest a portion of another ligament or tendon and insert it where the ACL goes. Unfortunately, this usually has a longer recovery time (two sites of wound healing). However, down the road, the outcomes are usually better. The ACL is less likely to tear again and your body is much more likely to successfully incorporate the new tissue and your ligament will be fine. This is what is usually done with athletes (especially young ones)

3) The final choice is to use a cadaver or donor to provide the new tissue. You can use a hamstring, Achilles, or many other tissues from a cadaver as a graft. This has the advantage of a faster recovery (as seen in the article) but runs the risk of poor outcomes later on in life. Tears are more likely (as one poster mentioned) and the body may reject the new tissue entirely... although that is uncommon.

The bottom line is that when reconstruction is the goal, most athletes will opt for a self donation because of the higher rate of success unless there is a unique situation where a speedy recovery is needed or he is at the end of a career and won't face the same level of workout intensity


meh, what's up doc?
Originally posted by Ether:
Hell of a thread title.

Dead Guys Achilles. I think I just found my new band name.
Originally posted by Leathaface:
^Thanks for that...do you work in orthopedics? I'm a 4th year med student right now.

Really? Where do you go? And where did you go for undergrad?
Had it done and am very happy I did.

5 year after being run over by a car and I'm back to playing tennis, swimming and zero pain.
Jerry Rice had #2 (that is why he broke his kneecap in his comeback)

I had the cadaver one on my right knee.
Originally posted by wysiwyg:
Jerry Rice had #2 (that is why he broke his kneecap in his comeback)

I had the cadaver one on my right knee.

I believe the same is true for Carson Palmer
Originally posted by KowboyKiller:
Dead organ donors or bodies for dissection are called cadavers, my dad has a cadaver's ligament for an ACL.


My brother just got a set of lungs at UCSF. We're here for another three weeks hoping that there is no rejection issues.
Originally posted by Doc9er:
Greetings! Although I'm not much for posting, I can contribute a little here... When handling a torn ligament such as the ACL, there are three general ideas:

1) You can leave it be and avoid extreme physical exertion on the area. In this case, the ACL will not grow back on its own and sports such as football are a terrible idea. Professional athletes almost always opt for treatment. That brings up the next two options

2) You can replace with you own tissue. In this case, you can harvest a portion of another ligament or tendon and insert it where the ACL goes. Unfortunately, this usually has a longer recovery time (two sites of wound healing). However, down the road, the outcomes are usually better. The ACL is less likely to tear again and your body is much more likely to successfully incorporate the new tissue and your ligament will be fine. This is what is usually done with athletes (especially young ones)

3) The final choice is to use a cadaver or donor to provide the new tissue. You can use a hamstring, Achilles, or many other tissues from a cadaver as a graft. This has the advantage of a faster recovery (as seen in the article) but runs the risk of poor outcomes later on in life. Tears are more likely (as one poster mentioned) and the body may reject the new tissue entirely... although that is uncommon.

The bottom line is that when reconstruction is the goal, most athletes will opt for a self donation because of the higher rate of success unless there is a unique situation where a speedy recovery is needed or he is at the end of a career and won't face the same level of workout intensity

wow what are u some kinda DR or something .


oh wait.
Originally posted by spizzy:
Originally posted by Leathaface:
^Thanks for that...do you work in orthopedics? I'm a 4th year med student right now.

Really? Where do you go? And where did you go for undergrad?

I went to undergrad at UCSD and I currently go to SUNY Downstate in Brooklyn, NY.