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Seattle's 2014 draft

Originally posted by DVDA:
Wilson is great at extending plays with his feet. Richardson could be a home run threat on any one of those plays based on his speed alone. I think that was part of the thought process that went into that pick.

Listening to Hugh Millen on local radio this morning, it sounds like that was the thought process.

If Richardson can take the top off the defense, and either get open on plays extended by RW, or clear out the underneath for Baldwin and Harvin, it could help add to the offense quite a bit.
Originally posted by DVDA:
Wilson is great at extending plays with his feet. Richardson could be a home run threat on any one of those plays based on his speed alone. I think that was part of the thought process that went into that pick.

yep.

http://seattletimes.com/html/jerrybrewer/2023580586_brewer11xml.html
Five years later, Schneider understands both the prototypical talent and mindset required for a Seahawk to succeed under Carroll. He also knows when to go against the norm and go after a player with "unique traits," as the Seahawks like to say.

Richardson was the example this season. The Seahawks saw his speed as a game-changer for their offense despite his slender frame (weighed 175 pounds at the NFL combine). If you look at the Seahawks' draft history over the past five years, you'll notice that, unless they're drafting an offensive lineman, they seek ridiculous athleticism and speed early in the draft. Later in the draft, while they still pursue athletic freaks, they hone in on specific qualities. They always know what they're looking for; they never get lost in the draft. Even if their opinions differ greatly from the masses, they don't waver.

"With the staff that we have here, I know that once you get a good football player, they'll find a way to put him on the field," northeast area scout Todd Brunner said.


  • Giedi
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  • Posts: 1,563
Originally posted by kentc1978:
I wouldn't be too quick to judge Seattles draft. We know they draft well, especially since one of their masterminds helped the 49ers build the current team.

I will say though that they did seem to reach (on paper) with some of their picks. The OL in the 2nd rd had a 5th rd grade on him.

Scott McDrunk is gone, but having said that - Russell Wilson and Lynch are the heartbeat of that offense. Both of them together will make those around them better. They will get UDFA wide outs, tight ends, and O linemen and so long as those two players are there, they will be a good offense. Take Lynch out and if they had to rely on Christine or some of the other backs, I don't know if they'd be a top 10 offense either in the pass or run department. Wilson is going to be a thorn in the side of the 49ers for along while. My hope is that his size will hold him back and force his ceiling lower against teams that have great pocket crushing defensive linemen like we do and looks like the Rams might have too.
  • Giedi
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 1,563
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
I think with Seattle they seemed to have made some big reaches but you just don't know. I think this draft shows that they might be get a little too full of themselves and too caught up with being non-conventional, but I still see guys that could end up being extremely successful. I'm not really a fan at all of Britt, Marsh and Scott but Norwood and Pierre-Louis are absolutely, custom-tailored perfect fits for them.

Staten is a smaller school DT who can be a force against the run and will help replace some of the depth that they've lost. Pinkins is just yet another massive defensive back project, a guy they can take their time with to develop, limited in some ways but he could play as either a Browner-style press corner or up near the line in a similar role as Kam Chancellor, eitherway at 6'2", 230, he's a handful and then some to deal with but might not see the field for quite awhile other than special teams.

I think the difference between the teams will be the QB's. I think Pete is as good enough a defensive coach as Fangio is. So their defense will always be stout. If Kaepernick can evolve to Wilson's level of passing (or beyond it) - with his higher ceiling, we can dominate them the way Montana dominated Herbert, Bartowski and Everett back in the dynasty days.
Originally posted by Giedi:
Scott McDrunk is gone, but having said that - Russell Wilson and Lynch are the heartbeat of that offense. Both of them together will make those around them better. They will get UDFA wide outs, tight ends, and O linemen and so long as those two players are there, they will be a good offense. Take Lynch out and if they had to rely on Christine or some of the other backs, I don't know if they'd be a top 10 offense either in the pass or run department. Wilson is going to be a thorn in the side of the 49ers for along while. My hope is that his size will hold him back and force his ceiling lower against teams that have great pocket crushing defensive linemen like we do and looks like the Rams might have too.

His size already holds him back to an extent. More and more teams are catching on and trapping him in the pocket, not allowing him to get to the outside. The Rams more or less laid down the blueprint for stuffing him in 2013, the 49ers improved on that in both games this season and Arizona took it a few steps further in the game at Seattle. With the entire NFC West geared up to stop him, only time will tell if he can actually adjust.
  • Jcool
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  • Posts: 12,888
2012 NFL Draft Grades: Ranking Teams That Failed on Draft Day

No. 1: Seattle Seahawks

After one of the worst picks in the first round I can ever remember, the Seattle Seahawks didn't draft any positions of need or draft for the future.

Pete Carroll is proving why he didn't make it in the NFL the first time. Not only was Bruce Irvin a reach at No. 15, the Seahawks proved they were oblivious to their madness by celebrating their selection.

As if the day wasn't bad enough, Seattle selecting Russell Wilson, a QB that doesn't fit their offense at all, was by far the worst move of the draft. With the two worst moves of the draft, Seattle is the only team that received an F on draft day.

Grade: F

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1165320-2012-nfl-draft-grades-power-ranking-teams-that-failed-on-draft-day
Originally posted by Jcool:
2012 NFL Draft Grades: Ranking Teams That Failed on Draft Day

No. 1: Seattle Seahawks

After one of the worst picks in the first round I can ever remember, the Seattle Seahawks didn't draft any positions of need or draft for the future.

Pete Carroll is proving why he didn't make it in the NFL the first time. Not only was Bruce Irvin a reach at No. 15, the Seahawks proved they were oblivious to their madness by celebrating their selection.

As if the day wasn't bad enough, Seattle selecting Russell Wilson, a QB that doesn't fit their offense at all, was by far the worst move of the draft. With the two worst moves of the draft, Seattle is the only team that received an F on draft day.

Grade: F

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1165320-2012-nfl-draft-grades-power-ranking-teams-that-failed-on-draft-day


Another reason why I don't take Bleacher Report seriously, along with Walter Football.
Originally posted by Jcool:
2012 NFL Draft Grades: Ranking Teams That Failed on Draft Day

No. 1: Seattle Seahawks

After one of the worst picks in the first round I can ever remember, the Seattle Seahawks didn't draft any positions of need or draft for the future.

Pete Carroll is proving why he didn't make it in the NFL the first time. Not only was Bruce Irvin a reach at No. 15, the Seahawks proved they were oblivious to their madness by celebrating their selection.

As if the day wasn't bad enough, Seattle selecting Russell Wilson, a QB that doesn't fit their offense at all, was by far the worst move of the draft. With the two worst moves of the draft, Seattle is the only team that received an F on draft day.

Grade: F

http://bleacherreport.com/articles/1165320-2012-nfl-draft-grades-power-ranking-teams-that-failed-on-draft-day


Stopped reading once I saw 'Bleacherreport'
Originally posted by LisaTwelve:
yep.

http://seattletimes.com/html/jerrybrewer/2023580586_brewer11xml.html

...If you look at the Seahawks' draft history over the past five years, you'll notice that, unless they're drafting an offensive lineman, they seek ridiculous athleticism and speed early in the draft. Later in the draft, while they still pursue athletic freaks, they hone in on specific qualities. They always know what they're looking for; they never get lost in the draft. Even if their opinions differ greatly from the masses, they don't waver...


You know you just described the Raider's draft philosophy for the past twenty years, right?
Originally posted by LisaTwelve:
yep.

http://seattletimes.com/html/jerrybrewer/2023580586_brewer11xml.html
Five years later, Schneider understands both the prototypical talent and mindset required for a Seahawk to succeed under Carroll. He also knows when to go against the norm and go after a player with "unique traits," as the Seahawks like to say.

Richardson was the example this season. The Seahawks saw his speed as a game-changer for their offense despite his slender frame (weighed 175 pounds at the NFL combine). If you look at the Seahawks' draft history over the past five years, you'll notice that, unless they're drafting an offensive lineman, they seek ridiculous athleticism and speed early in the draft. Later in the draft, while they still pursue athletic freaks, they hone in on specific qualities. They always know what they're looking for; they never get lost in the draft. Even if their opinions differ greatly from the masses, they don't waver.

"With the staff that we have here, I know that once you get a good football player, they'll find a way to put him on the field," northeast area scout Todd Brunner said.




I don't think Richardson was a smart move AT ALL. Honestly, I don't get why he was picked up.
Richardson has struggled with knee injuries, the only productive season he had was his last.

I've watched him closely in college, he is probably one of the worst in this class at getting off a press corner. Some of them are so bad I couldn't decide whether or not Richardson was attmepting to block, or get around the guy.
Not to mention, he isn't that WR that you can wait on to get open. That wasn't his style at Colorado.
This is a guy who they sent on fade routes and verticals, they depened on his speed and agility to get by the secondary (seriously, averaged 17 yards a catch)
This IS NOT a guy who you can depend to come back to the ball on broken plays, if you watch how he played at CO you would see that unless the ball was thrown his way within the first 7-8 seconds of the play, he wasn't going to get it.
If Seattle drafted this guy to fill the role of Tate, they have vastly underestimated Richardson's talents... Personally I don't even see Richardson making it out of special teams (Kearse, Baldwin, and Harvin will all start over him)

Also, he has yet to break 180lbs... You're telling me that you feel comfortable throwing to a guy thats 6'1 175lbs on a broken play where he might have the potential to get slammed by Reid/Willis/Bowman?

Not a smart move.
[ Edited by Quest4six on May 12, 2014 at 11:56 AM ]
Originally posted by Existence:
You know you just described the Raider's draft philosophy for the past twenty years, right?

No, I didn't know that.
If so, then I guess having a philosophy and implementing / executing it can be two different things


some other Hawks draft tidbits . . .
http://mynorthwest.com/292/2519984/What-we-learned-from-the-Seahawks-2014-draft
Originally posted by Quest4six:
I don't think Richardson was a smart move AT ALL. Honestly, I don't get why he was picked up.
Richardson has struggled with knee injuries, the only productive season he had was his last.

I've watched him closely in college, he is probably one of the worst in this class at getting off a press corner. Some of them are so bad I couldn't decide whether or not Richardson was attmepting to block, or get around the guy.
Not to mention, he isn't that WR that you can wait on to get open. That wasn't his style at Colorado.
This is a guy who they sent on fade routes and verticals, they depened on his speed and agility to get by the secondary (seriously, averaged 17 yards a catch)
This IS NOT a guy who you can depend to come back to the ball on broken plays, if you watch how he played at CO you would see that unless the ball was thrown his way within the first 7-8 seconds of the play, he wasn't going to get it.
If Seattle drafted this guy to fill the role of Tate, they have vastly underestimated Richardson's talents... Personally I don't even see Richardson making it out of special teams (Kearse, Baldwin, and Harvin will all start over him)

Also, he has yet to break 180lbs... You're telling me that you feel comfortable throwing to a guy thats 6'1 175lbs on a broken play where he might have the potential to get slammed by Reid/Willis/Bowman?

Not a smart move.

Being a colorado alum living in Denver, sadly I gotta agree. He was great when he wasnt bumped off the line or if a CB missed a coverage... it often ended in a 70 yard TD... BUT those plays simply dont happen that much in the NFL not to mention any CB that looks at his game tape will see the same thing and just shove him out of bounds anytime he tries to go outside.
[ Edited by 5280High on May 12, 2014 at 12:28 PM ]
Originally posted by 5280High:
Being a colorado alum living in Denver, sadly I gotta agree. He was great when he wasnt bumped off the line or if a CB missed a coverage... it often ended in a 70 yard TD... BUT those plays simply dont happen that much in the NFL not to mention any CB that looks at his game tape will see the same thing and just shove him out of bounds anytime he tries to go outside.


They hardly happen. When any team ran a press CB on this guy he was useless.
When he played Oregon we was buring us for a bit, then we caught on; bumped him off the line and switched to a cover-2 and he was pretty much non-existant for the last half of that game.
Unfortunately, I think he got drafted into the wrong division. The NFC west has some physical teams which will not mean great things for Richardson.

I have a clip of Ifo-Ekpre-Olumu forcing Richardson into some of the coaching staff during last seasons game, I gotta find it.
Originally posted by Phoenix49ers:
I think with Norwood they drafted a better receiver in the 4th round than the guy they drafted in the 2nd. Norwood fits their system so well its kind of scary, even before the draft you had articles on ESPN and SI talking about what a good fit he would be. Norwood isn't as fast as Richardson, but bigger and better all-around receiver. Tremendous hands and a very savvy, dangerous guy when things fall apart or when a QB starts to improvise. He won't put up big numbers, but he's the guy who will bury you on 3rd down by making a ridiculous catch along the sidelines. Clutch receiver who plays without an ego. If Baldwin doesn't get a long term deal then they just drafted his replacement.



"Nice awareness to locate and pluck, working back to the ball and aggressively attacking it. Never quits on his quarterback. Smart with an alert sideline sense. Knows where the sticks are. Good football character and known as a reliable option on and off the field. Positive attitude and carries himself like a professional. Already has his master's degree."




Understands option routes and is consistently on same page with QB. Has very good football IQ. Would excel in complex passing game, such as Patriots. Does a great job working back to QB after initial play breaks down.




Not afraid to work over middle. Makes tough catches in traffic. Not a strong runner after catch but doesn't shy from contact. Dependable possession receiver that does all the little things and pays attention to detail.

NFL Network did a segment on him during the draft and he sounds tailor-made for Russell Wilson and the Seahawks. He is going to give the Niners and other teams headaches once Wilson starts scrambling.

His bio from NFL.com
Understands how to get open. Good sideline awareness -- dots the "i." Established rapport with the quarterback is noticeable (is the first receiver sought on broken plays) and keeps working to come free.....Quicker-than-fast possession receiver with trusted hands a quarterback cherishes in critical situations. Could develop into a reliable, third-down option route runner.
And Seattle has drafted players that fits their team, scheme and personnel. I never thought "experts'" draft grades were all that relevant for them.