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Jarvis Landry-WR-LSU

Originally posted by VPofCarnage:
The 40 time itself is irrelevant. The receiver's speed is not. And all the drills at the combine do a pretty good job of showing (1) how much agility a guy has (2) how fast a guy can accelerate and (3) how much "long" speed a guy has. The 40 time is a good indication of that 2nd gear. Is it always accurate? Of course not. But let's be realistic here. A guy who runs a 4.77 is REALLY slow. If he was just hurt then I'll take back everything I said about it, but I'm not taking his word for it. He's going to have to prove it on pro day.

Could not agree with this statement more...

Jerry rice ran a 4.8

Terrell Davis ran a 4.7

There IS a difference in speed and acceleration.... And the final 40 time tells you neither.
[ Edited by Dshearn on Feb 26, 2014 at 1:30 PM ]
As an Auburn guy I have watched a lot of Landry. He has a lot of Brandon Lloyd in him.

He does have elite hand eye coordination. More then crabs and AB showed in college.

I don't know if the 49ers "need" him, but any team can use him.
He would be sick on the saints or the pack, those teams have QBs that can put a ball in places only he can go get.
Originally posted by crabman82:
this is why i've stopped watching the combine. remember jason hill ripping up the 40?

Remember Julio Jones ripping up the 40?
Originally posted by Dshearn:
Could not agree with this statement more...

Jerry rice ran a 4.8

Terrell Davis ran a 4.7

There IS a difference in speed and acceleration.... And the final 40 time tells you neither.

Jerry Rice's 40 time keeps getting lower and lower as time goes on. They didn't even electronically time 40s back then; those old times are useless.

The 40 time doesn't show acceleration. The 10 yard split is a pretty good indicator though. So are jump numbers because they show explosive power in pushing your body forward. Landry's 10 yard split & both jump numbers were pathetic. Especially for a smaller guy (204 pounds).
[ Edited by VPofCarnage on Feb 26, 2014 at 11:53 PM ]
I think Jerry ran a 4.59 back then. I could be wrong.
Originally posted by Mr.Mcgibblets:
... was a great 4 days of soaking in all the Combine fun. Now, I spend the week re-watching drills and absorbing everything 2014 Draft- related.

What a sick and committed hobby this is. Hey, if you ever want to check out my prospect rankings for curiosity or laughs, by all means... v

http://www.footballsfuture.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=542521

Sick and committed it may be...but I love the smell of pigskin in the morning!
Originally posted by qnnhan7:
I think Jerry ran a 4.59 back then. I could be wrong.

the 4.8 comes from Bill Walsh's book


and he correct above, the 40 yard dash use to start on command, so there was reaction time at play...and it was an average of multiple stopwatches..it was a different standard in the 80s then it is now.

TD was timed electronically.....

The point that is being made though is correct, there are BETTER metrics that paint a bigger picture then just the 40 yard dash.


He put up similar numbers to Wes Welker only he is slower and bigger
  • buck
  • Veteran
  • Posts: 11,399
When asked about WRs who project best to the slot, NFL Films' Greg Cosell said he believes LSU's Jarvis Landry will absolutely be a terrific player in the NFL.

"And I think the slot is where he will do most of his work," Cosell added. The respected NFL analyst then suggested names like Brandin Cooks and Josh Huff of Oregon. "There's plenty of guys in this draft that can fill that role." Our own Josh Norris thinks Landry could be this year's example of Andre Ellington, in terms of evaluators freaking out about Combine times and results while overlooking a quality player.

http://www.rotoworld.com/playernews/cfb/nfl-draft-player-news




Source: ESPN
Originally posted by buck:
When asked about WRs who project best to the slot, NFL Films' Greg Cosell said he believes LSU's Jarvis Landry will absolutely be a terrific player in the NFL.

"And I think the slot is where he will do most of his work," Cosell added. The respected NFL analyst then suggested names like Brandin Cooks and Josh Huff of Oregon. "There's plenty of guys in this draft that can fill that role." Our own Josh Norris thinks Landry could be this year's example of Andre Ellington, in terms of evaluators freaking out about Combine times and results while overlooking a quality player.

http://www.rotoworld.com/playernews/cfb/nfl-draft-player-news




Source: ESPN


Absolutely.

He's like Anquan Boldin. Nobody wants to pay him huge money because he's slow, but everybody wants him on their team when they actually see him play.
You can never have enough good WR's, and every "height / speed project" on your team takes up a valuable roster spot.
Originally posted by BrianGO:
Absolutely.

He's like Anquan Boldin. Nobody wants to pay him huge money because he's slow, but everybody wants him on their team when they actually see him play.
You can never have enough good WR's, and every "height / speed project" on your team takes up a valuable roster spot.

Why is every slow WR someone likes like Anquan Boldin? Anquan Boldin is maybe the toughest WR to ever play the game.

The two are not even remotely similar.
Originally posted by VPofCarnage:
Originally posted by BrianGO:
Absolutely.

He's like Anquan Boldin. Nobody wants to pay him huge money because he's slow, but everybody wants him on their team when they actually see him play.
You can never have enough good WR's, and every "height / speed project" on your team takes up a valuable roster spot.

Why is every slow WR someone likes like Anquan Boldin? Anquan Boldin is maybe the toughest WR to ever play the game.

The two are not even remotely similar.


They're both athletic, and they both have amazing hands and ball skills. I would say that is fairly remote.
  • Kolohe
  • Hall of Fame
  • Posts: 31,677
Originally posted by BrianGO:
Originally posted by VPofCarnage:
Originally posted by BrianGO:
Absolutely.

He's like Anquan Boldin. Nobody wants to pay him huge money because he's slow, but everybody wants him on their team when they actually see him play.
You can never have enough good WR's, and every "height / speed project" on your team takes up a valuable roster spot.

Why is every slow WR someone likes like Anquan Boldin? Anquan Boldin is maybe the toughest WR to ever play the game.

The two are not even remotely similar.


They're both athletic, and they both have amazing hands and ball skills. I would say that is fairly remote.

Spot on.

and to the other poster, you do know people look at more than just 40 times.
Originally posted by VPofCarnage:
Why is every slow WR someone likes like Anquan Boldin? Anquan Boldin is maybe the toughest WR to ever play the game.

The two are not even remotely similar.

Watch some video of the guy taking the ball away from DBs and you'll see some similarities with Boldin.
Originally posted by Kolohe:
Spot on.

and to the other poster, you do know people look at more than just 40 times.

This is true, but he also had a terrible 10 yard time, an atrocious & vertical. A guy has to prove that he's an NFL-caliber athlete to be a good prospect & not just a great college receiver. A lot of WRs who weren't NFL-caliber athletes beat up on college DBs.
Originally posted by VPofCarnage:
Originally posted by Kolohe:
Spot on.

and to the other poster, you do know people look at more than just 40 times.

This is true, but he also had a terrible 10 yard time, an atrocious & vertical. A guy has to prove that he's an NFL-caliber athlete to be a good prospect & not just a great college receiver. A lot of WRs who weren't NFL-caliber athletes beat up on college DBs.

Would be interesting to compare how fast the DBs he beat in college were to his potential competion in the NFL. I'm sure some were very fast in the 40 and/or the 10 yard split.