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2014 Draft Target: Jerry Rice's Cousin Jordan Matthews

  • cools
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He has produced great #'s in the tough SEC for two years, great attitude and work ethic, Hope he becomes a Niner
  • SaksV
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Love this kid. He caught somewhere around 9 passes per game this season. Incredible work ethic. Bloodline. We've GOT to draft him for our future...especially if we don't work things out with Anquan Boldin. Having Crabtree, Matthews and a 2nd year Patton with Vernon, 2nd year McDonald and possibly Boldin is scarrrrry.
  • buck
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In 2012, Jordan Matthews played in 13 games. He had 94 receptions for 1323 yards and 8 scores.
He averaged 14.07 yards per reception and 101.77 yards per game.

He had 47.69% of the teams receiving yards and he had 47.06 % of the team's receiving touchdowns.

Going into the 2013 season, every team playing Vanderbilt knew that stopping Matthews would be critical.

In 2013, Matthews, in 13 games, had 112 receptions for 1477 yards and 7 scores.
He averaged 13.19 yards a reception and 113.62 yards a game.

In 2013, he did have 1 less touchdown in 2013, but he had 18 more receptions and 154 more yards.
He had 49.93% of the team's receiving yards and 46.67 % of the team's receiving touchdowns.

His production grade (or production ratio) was .9475 in 2012. In 2013, it was .9659.

Even though teams knew stopping Matthews was key, they just could not do it.
[ Edited by buck on Jan 15, 2014 at 1:09 PM ]
Originally posted by NTeply49:
Matthews, a cousin of the legendary Jerry Rice, is a better football player than he is an athlete. While he led the SEC with a gaudy 19.0 yards-per-catch average last season, he has good (but not great) build-up speed. His size allows him to be moved inside and out in Vandy's offense, allowing the team to find him favorable matchups and has very good hand-eye coordination to haul in tough passes, including one-handed catches.
http://www.cbssports.com/nfl/draft/players/1785887/jordan-matthews

Let's put ourselves in position for this guy next year and keep it in the family!

Honestly, like most knowledgeable fans, I was sold when I read Jerry Rice

DYNASTY WHOOOO HAAAAAAAAAAAAAA!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Really? Who is the Jerrt Rice guy? Are we supposed to know him? Was he good?

Better football player than athlete? Does that mean that he isn't super fast, yet get open and produces? Sounds like I guy we used to have that was pretty goo. if only I could remember his name.....
  • cools
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Would be cool if he ended up a Niner and Rice asked him to ware #80
Matthews is an excellent WR...but given a choice, I think I'd opt for Benjamin because of his yards per catch and 15 TD's, not to mention his ridiculous size at 6-5, 230+ and surprising speed.
Originally posted by CorvaNinerFan:
Matthews is an excellent WR...but given a choice, I think I'd opt for Benjamin because of his yards per catch and 15 TD's, not to mention his ridiculous size at 6-5, 230+ and surprising speed.

pass on Benjamin. i don't know where this "surprising speed" stuff is coming from. i actually think he'll time pretty slow. he's also not very fluid. i'd prefer Jordan Matthews over him.
Originally posted by buck:
In 2012, Jordan Matthews played in 13 games. He had 94 receptions for 1323 yards and 8 scores.
He averaged 14.07 yards per reception and 101.77 yards per game.

He had 47.69% of the teams receiving yards and he had 47.06 % of the team's receiving touchdowns.

Going into the 2013 season, every team playing Vanderbilt knew that stopping Matthews would be critical.

In 2013, Matthews, in 13 games, had 112 receptions for 1477 yards and 7 scores.
He averaged 13.19 yards a reception and 113.62 yards a game.

In 2013, he did have 1 less touchdown in 2013, but he had 18 more receptions and 154 more yards.
He had 49.93% of the team's receiving yards and 46.67 % of the team's receiving touchdowns.

His production grade (or production ratio) was .9475 in 2012. In 2013, it was .9659.

Even though teams knew stopping Matthews was key, they just could not do it.

Thatz what Im talkin about a PROVEN player... Im all for Matthews even if we have to trade back up into tha 1st round ...
  • buck
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Originally posted by CorvaNinerFan:
Matthews is an excellent WR...but given a choice, I think I'd opt for Benjamin because of his yards per catch and 15 TD's, not to mention his ridiculous size at 6-5, 230+ and surprising speed.

At this point, I would go with Matthews.

Benjamin does not have the production of Matthews and Benjamin had the benefit of playing along two other wide receivers who challenged the defenses. Matthews did not have this advantage and still excelled. Matthews does not lack size, and his production is better than Benjamin's. The defenses have focused on stopping Matthews; the same can not be said for Benjamin.

Matthews has proven to have excellent intangibles. I am not sure that same can be said about Benjamin.

We have to see what Benjamin and Matthews do at the combine in the events and in the wide receiver drills.

We need to draft, in my not so humble opinion, at least two wide receivers. I want us to draft Matthews. At this point, I have not decided who I want our second wide receiver pick to be.

edit: Here is an interesting article that includes Benjamin's receiving metrics.
It does not include Matthews. It compares Benjamin to Watkins, Lee, and Evans.

But it is interesting and has stats that most of us do not have.

http://www.rotoworld.com/articles/cfb/46006/349/peshek-top-4-wr-metrics[/url][/url]
[ Edited by buck on Jan 15, 2014 at 7:38 PM ]
  • buck
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Jordan Matthews vs. Kelvin Benjamin

Every defensive coordinator facing Florida St and Vanderbilt had to decide how to stop their passing game.

Jameis Winston clearly presented more of a problem than does Austyn Carta-Samuels, the Vanderbilt quarterback.

But, stopping the quarterback was not the only option. The defensive coordinator could focus on stopping their receivers.

Here are the three main receiving threats for Florida St and Vanderbilt.





By far, Matthews is Vanderbilt's receiving threat. Shutting down Jordan Matthews was the key to stopping the Vanderbilt passing game. Every defense coordinator facing the Commodores knew that stopping Matthews was the key. But it proved to be very hard to do.

On the other hand, it is not clear that shutting down one of the Florida State's receiving threats would have shut down Florida State's passing game. Florida State's passing attack is much more balanced than Vanderbilt's.

In my estimation, Jordan Matthews has proven that he can carry a team's passing attack.

Kelvin Benjamin, no matter his physical attributes, just has not proven that he can carry a team.

In the national title game, Rasheed Greene, not Kelvin Benjamin, carried the team's passing attack.
  • cools
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Matthews and Moncrief would be a pretty sweet duo for the future
Originally posted by buck:
Jordan Matthews vs. Kelvin Benjamin

Every defensive coordinator facing Florida St and Vanderbilt had to decide how to stop their passing game.

Jameis Winston clearly presented more of a problem than does Austyn Carta-Samuels, the Vanderbilt quarterback.

But, stopping the quarterback was not the only option. The defensive coordinator could focus on stopping their receivers.

Here are the three main receiving threats for Florida St and Vanderbilt.





By far, Matthews is Vanderbilt's receiving threat. Shutting down Jordan Matthews was the key to stopping the Vanderbilt passing game. Every defense coordinator facing the Commodores knew that stopping Matthews was the key. But it proved to be very hard to do.

On the other hand, it is not clear that shutting down one of the Florida State's receiving threats would have shut down Florida State's passing game. Florida State's passing attack is much more balanced than Vanderbilt's.

In my estimation, Jordan Matthews has proven that he can carry a team's passing attack.

Kelvin Benjamin, no matter his physical attributes, just has not proven that he can carry a team.

In the national title game, Rasheed Greene, not Kelvin Benjamin, carried the team's passing attack.

All of this. He has high production, has solid measureables, and would be a great receiver to eventually replace Anquan Boldin (hopefully we can extend him another two seasons). Jordan Matthews paired with another receiver with some top end speed would set us up with enough youth at the position to carry us for the next several years. There are many receivers who probably would get a first round grade at the moment. I'm hoping Jordan Matthews takes a Keenan Allen type of drop and he would be available to us at Kansas City's pick (#56), which would allow us to take one of the top corners available and still get Matthews without having to do any trade ups. I'm hoping that GMs fall in love with the size of guys like Benjamin over consistently productive guys like Jordan Matthews.
Just for fun:

Boldin: 4.71
Fitzgerald: 4.63
Crabtree: 4.54
Green: 4.48 (14th WR in speed at the combine in 2011--Lockette was #2)
Bryant: 4.53
Manningham: 4.59
Amendola: 4.68 (injuries hurt but does anyone doubt his ability?)

So, as much as I would like Deion Sanders speed in a WR, it just isn't the be all, end all stat to look at. I really like production and quality of opponents as measuring sticks. After that height and speed come...after quickness, health and attitude. All this to say--I really like Matthews!
Measured in at 6'2 5/8th and 209lbs with a ridiculously big wingspan of 80 1/8.
Double post.
[ Edited by Travisty13 on Jan 20, 2014 at 7:12 AM ]