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How far will Star Lotulelei drop because of his heart condition?

Originally posted by WRATHman44:
Originally posted by JustinNiner:
but he could be risk anywhere. I wouldn't jump up the board for him but if he fell to #32 I wouldn't be opposed to taking a steal like that.

Man, I hate to be the jerk here, but we have pick #31. I REALLY don't want to explain why...


opps my bad haha...gotta kick myself for accidentally writing that.
HATE to see the Cards get him or Hawks moving up to snag him.

Wish him well. If docs clear him Philly, Browns.
Not far enough...there's still plenty of other DL talent to be had and I hope Baalke gets a couple of 'em.
As a cardiologist, let me tell you that this serious. If his ejection fraction is confirmed to be 44%, as the article reports, I doubt that he will ever play football again. We are talking about the left ventricle here, the part of the heart that pumps blood to the whole body. When he plays football, his LV has to pump 2-3 times normal resting volumes against much higher than normal pressures.

Why is his EF low? It might be due to a recent viral infection, in which case it should improve over time, but it is also possible that a cause will never be found, and that his EF will stay the same or get worse.
Originally posted by ClassicNiner:
As a cardiologist, let me tell you that this serious. If his ejection fraction is confirmed to be 44%, as the article reports, I doubt that he will ever play football again. We are talking about the left ventricle here, the part of the heart that pumps blood to the whole body. When he plays football, his LV has to pump 2-3 times normal resting volumes against much higher than normal pressures.

Why is his EF low? It might be due to a recent viral infection, in which case it should improve over time, but it is also possible that a cause will never be found, and that his EF will stay the same or get worse.

Hey ClassicNiner, just sent you a PM. Cool to see a cardiologist on here...I'm starting my Internal Medicine residency in July and maybe one day looking to a Cardiology fellowship as well.
Im not a doctor but from what i understand sports can make this worse. If I understand athletes have a higher EF capacity. Physical activity strengthens your perhieral nervous system which would cause your EF to pump more blood than usual. When resting the EF function bottoms out. Being a heavy guy like star it takes a lot to mantain his anatomy and hia body may not be able to handle such extreme physical activity without his heart suffering.
Originally posted by Leathaface:
Hey ClassicNiner, just sent you a PM. Cool to see a cardiologist on here...I'm starting my Internal Medicine residency in July and maybe one day looking to a Cardiology fellowship as well.

Lots of Niner fans do other weird stuff. Cardiology has been a great subspecialty choice over the past 30 years - not sure that will continue.
Originally posted by eonblue:
Im not a doctor but from what i understand sports can make this worse. If I understand athletes have a higher EF capacity. Physical activity strengthens your perhieral nervous system which would cause your EF to pump more blood than usual. When resting the EF function bottoms out. Being a heavy guy like star it takes a lot to mantain his anatomy and hia body may not be able to handle such extreme physical activity without his heart suffering.

A normal size person pumps about 5 liters/min at rest, for a 300+ pound guy, maybe 8 L/min. A conditioned cyclist can pump >20 liters/min over a sustained period of time, which is an amazing feat. A football lineman doesn't pump that much but does so against a higher pressure.

How many liters you pump per minute is your heart rate multiplied by how much your left ventricle pumps per beat. If your LV volume at rest is 100 cc and you pump out 70 cc per beat, your ejection fraction is 70. If your ejection fraction is 44%, you need a higher heart rate to pump the same volume. Also, if your EF is depressed, you will have a problem when your blood pressure (the resistance to pumping) is higher, as when a lineman strains.

One point I didn't mention in my first post is that Star may have coronary blockages that are severe enough to reduce his ejection fraction. One would say he may be too young for that, but Thomas Herrion wasn't.
Doesn't sound like much.
Originally posted by loxdoggie:
Not far - many pro athletes have overcome various minor heart conditions

There are no minor heart conditions

This thread reminded me of Gaines Adams, RIP
Originally posted by JustinNiner:
Originally posted by WRATHman44:
Originally posted by JustinNiner:
but he could be risk anywhere. I wouldn't jump up the board for him but if he fell to #32 I wouldn't be opposed to taking a steal like that.

Man, I hate to be the jerk here, but we have pick #31. I REALLY don't want to explain why...


opps my bad haha...gotta kick myself for accidentally writing that.

Wishful thinking
I don't know exactly what's wrong with his heart, but I remember reading about cyclist Eddy Mercks not being allowed to compete because doctors thought he had a heart condition. Turned out his heart and his whole cardiovascular system was simply being super-efficient, and didn't need to pump as much blood when at rest. Another cyclist (can't remember his name) had a resting heart rate of 25-30 during his prime. Let's hope Star's heart condition is something similar to these guys.
Originally posted by wysiwyg:

Roadhouse
Originally posted by SFTifoso:
I don't know exactly what's wrong with his heart, but I remember reading about cyclist Eddy Mercks not being allowed to compete because doctors thought he had a heart condition. Turned out his heart and his whole cardiovascular system was simply being super-efficient, and didn't need to pump as much blood when at rest. Another cyclist (can't remember his name) had a resting heart rate of 25-30 during his prime. Let's hope Star's heart condition is something similar to these guys.

Many well trained aerobic athletes have slow heart rates. Bjorn Borg, the great tennis player, had a heart rate around 30. Ejection fraction is different though. There are minor cardiac conditions that he could play with, but this is unlikely to be one of them.