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Pro Days Updated*

Originally posted by al49erfan:
Originally posted by jreff22:
AUSTIN, Texas — Earl Thomas already was in good standing with NFL scouts after an impressive combine performance last month. But the safety outdid himself — and every other prospect Texas had on display — at the school’s pro day Wednesday.

Thomas (5-10 5/8, 202) ran a blazing 4.37-second 40-yard dash, which would have tied for the third-fastest time at the combine. It also would have been the best time by .08 seconds among all defensive backs.

Thomas, an accomplished pianist who also plays the organ, saxophone and drums, has an interesting back story. He left school after his sophomore year (he was a redshirt sophomore last season), but coach Mack Brown explained to me that it was because the safety’s home in Orange, Texas, was devastated by Hurricane Rita in 2005, forcing his family to live in a hotel for a year.

Texas’ pro day was as big as ever, as 79 scouts and coaches representing 30 teams (the Rams and Lions were the only two not represented), including three head coaches, came together to watch QB Colt McCoy and 18 other draft prospects, including Thomas.

McCoy didn’t weigh in with the rest of his teammates, choosing to keep his measurements from the combine (6-1, 216). I’m told he’ll run drills and work starting around 1 p.m. ET. Check back shortly for an update.

Brown kicked things off with a big breakfast for all the scouts and coaches, as well as a 20-minute slide presentation on the history of all the players who have suited up for the Longhorns throughout the years.

Things are sure to pick up soon. Until then, here are some of the 19 prospects who will work out and the 40-yard dash times just completed indoors on FieldTurf:

CB Deon Beasley (5-foot-9 5/8, 180 pounds) ran 4.47 and 4.46 in the 40-yard dash.

DT Lamarr Houston (6-2 7/8, 300) will keep his 40 times from the combine.

LB Sergio Kindle (6-2 7/8, 249) will keep his 40 times from the combine.

WR Jordan Shipley (5-11 1/2, 187) ran 4.54 and 4.56 in the 40.

G Charlie Tanner (6-3 7/8, 305) ran 5.20 and 5.12 in the 40.

T Adam Ulatoski (6-6, 302) ran 4.58 and 4.56 in the 40.
LB Roddrick Muckelroy (6-1 5/8, 234) ran 4.73 and 4.75 in the 40.

REALLY? Is that right? Thats pretty dang fast for a Tackle

[/b]

Damn I missed that-draft that guy in the latter rounds and have him switch to FB and lead Gore on sweeps, off tackle and up the middle. Singletary will have the running game he is looking for.
There is 1 official Pro Day left which will be held today, for Hawaii.

From this point on all Pro Days will be more along the lines of personal workouts held for specific prospects.
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.
Unlike in years past where the Trojans have featured several elite prospects, the USC Pro Day today has generated surprising little buzz among scouts I've spoken with.

Some of this is the fact that the most highly touted player from USC -- safety Taylor Mays -- lit up the Combine with his blazing times in the 40-yard dash and wasn't expected to do the full workout in LA today. As expected, he did not run. He did go through defensive back drills, however, and, according to scouts in attendance, struggled a bit in his transition. This is no surprise to anyone who has watched him in person. We mentioned as much about Mays on several occasions, including at the Senior Bowl.

It didn't help that today's workout was in drizzly, cold conditions. There were, however, several noteworthy performances.

One athlete that did help himself with another strong performance I'm told is pass rusher Everson Griffen. Not only did Griffen get timed at 4.61 seconds in the 40-yard dash, he demonstrated an explosive burst off the snap in defensive line drills and good fluidity in linebacker drills.

Cornerback Kevin Thomas continues to move up draft rankings with another strong performance. He was timed in the early to mid 4.4s and looked very good in positional drills. Thomas won't have much time to rest before working out again, as he's scheduled a personal workout with Cleveland scouts for Thursday.

Versatile offensive lineman Alex Parsons helped his cause by shaving nearly three-tenths of a second off his Combine time in the 40-yard dash. Parsons had been clocked at 5.16 seconds in the event in Indianapolis, but scouts had him in the early 4.9s Wednesday.

Wide receiver Damian Williams did not run the 40-yard dash in LA, which was a bit of a surprise as scouts thought he'd might want to try to better the 4.55 time he recorded in Indianapolis. He did show off his quick feet and balance as a route-runner. I've said it before... I see Damian Williams as a poor man's Greg Jennings and feel that his sure route-running and hands make him one of the more pro-ready receivers of the 2010 draft.

Considering that left tackle Charles Brown was one of the few Trojans who did not do the full workout at the Combine, his Pro Day performance was more important. Unfortunately for Brown, he suffered a pulled hamstring running the 40-yard dash and was unable to participate in the position drills. He also wasn't able to match the 21 repetitions of 225 pounds he posted at the Combine, lifting the bar 20 times today.

Like Brown, running back Joe McKnight was unable to fully compete Wednesday due to injury. McKnight told scouts that he's battling a toe injury. He had been timed at 4.45 seconds in the 40-yard dash at the Combine.
Originally posted by jreff22:
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.

I bet Cleveland jumps on him in the 2nd.
Originally posted by ghostrider:
Originally posted by jreff22:
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.

I bet Cleveland jumps on him in the 2nd.

Ive been thinking that for a while, they do have 2 3rd rounders so they may move back up into the 2nd to get him.....or Pike in the 3rd.
Originally posted by jreff22:
Originally posted by ghostrider:
Originally posted by jreff22:
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.

I bet Cleveland jumps on him in the 2nd.

Ive been thinking that for a while, they do have 2 3rd rounders so they may move back up into the 2nd to get him.....or Pike in the 3rd.

The other team I could see going for him in the 2nd is the Redskins and they pick immediately in front of Cleveland. So that could be interesting there. I wonder if the Browns might trade their 2nd and a low rounder to move up a couple of spots(?)
Originally posted by ghostrider:
Originally posted by jreff22:
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.

I bet Cleveland jumps on him in the 2nd.

+1

[ Edited by sdaddy101269 on Apr 1, 2010 at 11:15:54 ]
Originally posted by sdaddy101269:
Originally posted by ghostrider:
Originally posted by jreff22:
There are two primary reasons why Colt McCoy completed a staggering 70% of his passes in 2009.

For one, the Texas offense was primarily asked him to throw short to intermediate routes.

Secondly, McCoy is simply an accurate passer who throws a very catchable ball.

McCoy's passing prowess was on display in Austin today as scouts from 30 different teams were on hand to see him throw. McCoy, of course, had been unable to throw at the Combine or participate in any of the post-season all-star games due to the shoulder injury he suffered in the National Championship game.

According to scouts in attendance, McCoy threw the ball with better zip than expected, popping receivers' hands on crossing routes. His deep balls had a tendency to sail a bit, but because his passes are thrown with such tight spirals, their trajectory is easy for receivers to track and collect. He completed all 55 of his passes, throwing to former teammates Jordan Shipley, Nate Jones and Quan Cosby, as well as former Texas standout Brian Carter. Texas offensive coordinator scripted the workout, which featured McCoy taking snaps from center, doing play-action and attempting more long passes than he was typically asked to throw with the Longhorns.

Scouts on hand were impressed with McCoy's workout and felt that he solidified his stock as an early to mid second round choice.

---- I noted in a previous blog posting that Jordan Shipley was enjoying a strong Pro Day performance. He shaved a full tenth of a second off his 40-yard dash time from the Combine by running a 4.53 in Austin and also recorded a 36.5" vertical jump.

I bet Cleveland jumps on him in the 2nd


[ Edited by sdaddy101269 on Apr 1, 2010 at 11:18:00 ]
Offensive tackle Anthony Davis, a projected first-round pick who didn’t work out at his school’s pro day last month, held a private workout for 11 NFL teams on Tuesday.

Sources who attended the workout told me he was impressive in positional drills. He weighed 328 pounds but the source said he appeared very light on his feet. It was a workout scouts needed to see.

Davis failed to show up at Rutgers’ pro day on March 10. His agent told me that Davis was suffering from a sore hamstring and a stomach virus. Whatever the reason, his absence didn’t go over well. He had scouts coming from all over the country and he didn’t show.

He’s got a ton of potential and talent but there are some red flags. He’s got to understand that football needs to be important in his life.

With all that said, I could see him landing in the top 10 picks, maybe even to the Raiders at No. 8.
Economics could push Berry down the board

Tennessee safety Eric Berry is currently NFLDraftScout.com's 4th rated prospect for the 2010 NFL Draft. I've spoken to NFL scouts and front office executives who feel we have him rated too low, claiming that with the exception of perhaps Nebraska defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, Berry is the surest thing of this year's class.

What those same league personnel have told me, however, is that Berry is likely to fall past these rankings in the draft, itself. He'll fall strictly because teams do not want to give a safety the money that goes with a top five pick -- or perhaps even money that goes with a top eight pick.

Take into consideration the contracts signed by players drafted with the No. 5-9 picks last year. Remember that contracts generally increase year to year, meaning that the first (or 50th) overall pick in 2010 is likely to sign a deal for more money than the man who was drafted with the same pick last year.

Mark Sanchez, the fifth overall pick, signed last year a contract of five years for 50 million dollars, including 28 million in guarantees. By hitting certain incentives, Sanchez's contract could reach nearly 60 million. Sanchez's yearly average would be -- at minimum -- 10 million.

Andre Smith, taken a pick later by Cincinnati, signed a six year deal worth a maximum of 42 million, with 21 million guaranteed. Smith's yearly average is seven million.

The seventh overall pick, Darrius Heyward-Bey, agreed to terms with the Raiders of a five year deal of 38.25 million with 23.5 million guaranteed. Heyward-Bey's yearly average is 7.65 million.

Eugene Monroe, the 8th overall pick, signed with Jacksonville for five years and 35.4 million, a yearly average of 7.08 million.

BJ Raji, drafted by Green Bay 9th overall, signed a five year, 28.5 million dollar contract. His year average is 5.7 million.

Each of these players -- a quarterback, two offensive tackles, a wide receiver and defensive tackle -- signed rich deals, but ones under the 2010 Franchise Tag tenders. This means that these rookies, while very well paid, would not earn more than the average of the top five current NFL players at their respective positions in average salary per year.

The problem for Eric Berry is that safety is the third lowest tendered position (ahead of only tight ends and kickers/punters) and has a franchise tag tender of 6.45 million dollars.

If Berry was to be drafted by a team earlier than the 9th pick, at least according to the deals from last year's draft, he'd be slotted to earn more money than the best at his position. Looking past the obvious question of fairness to established stars like Ed Reed or Troy Polamalu, the problem is that whichever team drafted Berry would find itself in a very difficult position five years later -- when Berry, assuming he played well, would likely be expecting a raise for his second contract. If drafted earlier than 9th overall, Berry's rookie contract would potentially be worth more than any deal a team would be willing to give him as a free agent. Unless the Franchise tender for safeties suddenly exploded, Berry's NFL team would likely be able to slap the franchise tag on him, guaranteeing him less than he'd earned in his original rookie contract.

I made the point in the introduction paragraphs of my mock draft that NFL teams can use the cliche of taking the best available player as much as they'd like; the reality is that position value dictates many selections.

For Eric Berry, an unquestioned top five talent, the perceived value of his position could keep him out of the top eight in the 2010 draft.
^^thats interesting, if he were to get past 8 i think the niners should trade up for him
Originally posted by jreff22:
Economics could push Berry down the board

Tennessee safety Eric Berry is currently NFLDraftScout.com's 4th rated prospect for the 2010 NFL Draft. I've spoken to NFL scouts and front office executives who feel we have him rated too low, claiming that with the exception of perhaps Nebraska defensive tackle Ndamukong Suh, Berry is the surest thing of this year's class.

What those same league personnel have told me, however, is that Berry is likely to fall past these rankings in the draft, itself. He'll fall strictly because teams do not want to give a safety the money that goes with a top five pick -- or perhaps even money that goes with a top eight pick.

Take into consideration the contracts signed by players drafted with the No. 5-9 picks last year. Remember that contracts generally increase year to year, meaning that the first (or 50th) overall pick in 2010 is likely to sign a deal for more money than the man who was drafted with the same pick last year.

Mark Sanchez, the fifth overall pick, signed last year a contract of five years for 50 million dollars, including 28 million in guarantees. By hitting certain incentives, Sanchez's contract could reach nearly 60 million. Sanchez's yearly average would be -- at minimum -- 10 million.

Andre Smith, taken a pick later by Cincinnati, signed a six year deal worth a maximum of 42 million, with 21 million guaranteed. Smith's yearly average is seven million.

The seventh overall pick, Darrius Heyward-Bey, agreed to terms with the Raiders of a five year deal of 38.25 million with 23.5 million guaranteed. Heyward-Bey's yearly average is 7.65 million.

Eugene Monroe, the 8th overall pick, signed with Jacksonville for five years and 35.4 million, a yearly average of 7.08 million.

BJ Raji, drafted by Green Bay 9th overall, signed a five year, 28.5 million dollar contract. His year average is 5.7 million.

Each of these players -- a quarterback, two offensive tackles, a wide receiver and defensive tackle -- signed rich deals, but ones under the 2010 Franchise Tag tenders. This means that these rookies, while very well paid, would not earn more than the average of the top five current NFL players at their respective positions in average salary per year.

The problem for Eric Berry is that safety is the third lowest tendered position (ahead of only tight ends and kickers/punters) and has a franchise tag tender of 6.45 million dollars.

If Berry was to be drafted by a team earlier than the 9th pick, at least according to the deals from last year's draft, he'd be slotted to earn more money than the best at his position. Looking past the obvious question of fairness to established stars like Ed Reed or Troy Polamalu, the problem is that whichever team drafted Berry would find itself in a very difficult position five years later -- when Berry, assuming he played well, would likely be expecting a raise for his second contract. If drafted earlier than 9th overall, Berry's rookie contract would potentially be worth more than any deal a team would be willing to give him as a free agent. Unless the Franchise tender for safeties suddenly exploded, Berry's NFL team would likely be able to slap the franchise tag on him, guaranteeing him less than he'd earned in his original rookie contract.

I made the point in the introduction paragraphs of my mock draft that NFL teams can use the cliche of taking the best available player as much as they'd like; the reality is that position value dictates many selections.

For Eric Berry, an unquestioned top five talent, the perceived value of his position could keep him out of the top eight in the 2010 draft.

I think the financial aspects of a draft pick are a factor that we fans do not usually see or evaluate. Berry will be an interesting case. I also think it is rediculous to pay rookies the extravagent salaries, or to get raises because of prices from last year. It is also interesting to see how the team will handle the contracts in light of the potential lock out from next year. Should be an interesting draft.
^^Keep in mind that we drafted a TE 6th overall.

I think teams would be willing to pay if they believe the prospect will be an elite player and more so than the other available options. I'm sure most teams in the league wouldn't hesitate too much to pay Ed Reed or Troy Polamalu that kind of money.
Originally posted by ghostrider:
^^Keep in mind that we drafted a TE 6th overall.

I think teams would be willing to pay if they believe the prospect will be an elite player and more so than the other available options. I'm sure most teams in the league wouldn't hesitate too much to pay Ed Reed or Troy Polamalu that kind of money.

Couldn't agree more but Reed is a proven commodity.....at this point Berry isn't.